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This code fails verification:

.assembly extern mscorlib {}
.assembly Program {}

.method private static void Main() cil managed
{
    .entrypoint
    .maxstack 3

    .locals init ( int32[0 ... 10] a )

    ldc.i4 10
    newarr int32
    stloc.0

    ldloc.0
    ldc.i4.0
    ldc.i4.s 32
    stelem.i4

    call string [mscorlib]System.Console::ReadLine()
    pop
    ret
}

With the following error:

[IL]: Error: [C:[...]Program.exe : ::Main ][offset 0x0000000F] Expected single dimension array. 1 Error(s) Verifying Program.exe

Yet this code verifies fine:

.assembly extern mscorlib {}
.assembly Program {}

.method private static void Main() cil managed
{
    .entrypoint
    .maxstack 3

    .locals init ( int32[] a )

    ldc.i4 10
    newarr int32
    stloc.0

    ldloc.0
    ldc.i4.0
    ldc.i4.s 32
    stelem.i4

    call string [mscorlib]System.Console::ReadLine()
    pop
    ret
}

Is this an unimplemented feature, an error in the CLR or PEVerify, or simply a misunderstanding of usage? The programs both execute fine.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

My guess -- and it's only a guess -- is that this is related to the distinction between vectors and arrays.

The ECMA CLI Specification (Partition II, Sections 14.1 and 14.2) says this:

Vectors are single-dimension arrays with a zero lower bound. They have direct support in CIL instructions (newarr, ldelem, stelem, and ldelema).

[...]

While vectors have direct support through CIL instructions, all other arrays are supported by the VES by creating subtypes of the abstract class System.Array.

Vectors are declared using T[] syntax, whereas arrays can be declared in various ways using T[n], T[p,q], T[x...y] etc. So, in your first example, the int32[0 ... 10] syntax is an array declaration. In your second example, the int32[] syntax is a vector declaration.

My guess is that the verifier objects to your first example because it thinks that you're trying to use newarr and stelem on an array rather than a vector. Presumably the verifier is only examining the type of declaration and doesn't take the rank, bounds etc of the array into account. The reason both examples execute properly is because a 1-dimension array with a zero lower-bound is a vector, to all intents and purposes.

As for why the error message says "Expected single dimension array" rather than "Expected vector", I have no idea!

share|improve this answer
    
So would that mean the proper way to index an array as in my first example is by accessing through its indexer? –  Michael J. Gray Dec 23 '11 at 5:03
1  
@Michael: I suppose so. Another option would be to use the GetValue‌​, SetValue etc methods. And you'd construct it using newobj rather than newarr. (The CLI spec also says that the runtime provides specialised constructors and Get and Set methods that aren't present in the Array type's metadata.) –  LukeH Dec 23 '11 at 12:00

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