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I've got a class which I need to implicitly convert to a few things, with intermediate values, e.g.

struct outer {
    struct inner {
        operator T() { return T(); }
    };
    operator inner() { return inner(); }
};

If I have this structure, is it always valid to do, e.g.

void f(T t);
outer o;
f(o);
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2  
What is T? A template Type? –  Mooing Duck Dec 22 '11 at 22:41
2  
@MooingDuck: A type. It doesn't matter what T is. It's not a template because I didn't take any parameters? –  Puppy Dec 22 '11 at 22:44
4  
f(o) would require two user defined conversions, while the standard allows maximum std-conversion -> u-d conversion -> std-conversion. –  Gene Bushuyev Dec 22 '11 at 22:49
1  
The complier will only perform one implicit conversion automatically. Normally implicit conversions are best avoided - they tend to make code harder to understand and maintain. –  mark Dec 22 '11 at 22:50

2 Answers 2

§13.3.3.1.2 [over.ics.user] p1

A user-defined conversion sequence consists of an initial standard conversion sequence followed by a user-defined conversion (12.3) followed by a second standard conversion sequence.

Notice the singular and the missing of the word "sequence". Only one user-defined conversion will ever be considered during an implicit conversion sequence.

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Is there a corresponding bit that states only one "user-defined conversion sequence" will occur? –  ssube Dec 23 '11 at 5:47
    
@peachykeen that's the very definition of parameter passing. For class types it involves one user defined conversion sequence (if the argument type differs from the parameter type) followed by a final copy of the temporary resulting T into the parameter of type T. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 23 '11 at 19:29

This works:

struct Foo {}; // renamed T in Foo to avoid confusion!

struct outer {
        struct inner {
                operator Foo() { return Foo(); }
        };

        operator inner() { return inner(); }

        template <typename T>
        operator T () {
                return operator inner();
        }
};

int main() {
        void f(Foo t);
        outer o;
        f(o);
}

But only because f is not overloaded, so it is not really a solution.

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If that was acceptable, I'd just make the Foo operator in the outer class. –  Puppy Dec 23 '11 at 14:25
    
I am not surprised that this is not "acceptable", but it is the best "fix" I got. –  curiousguy Dec 24 '11 at 0:05

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