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I thought the following selector would only match example b. Can someone explain to me a little more about how CSS paths work?

body div span a{
    background:#000;
    color:#fff;
}
<body>
    <div><span><span><a href="#">example a</a></span></span></div>
    <div><span><a href="#">example b</a></span></div>
    <span><div><span><a href="#">example c</a></span></div></span>
</body>

A visual example or a more elaborated tree/paths with "this will be affected", "this won't" would be extremely helpful to me. A link to a good guide could also be interesting.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

See the W3C specification for more information.

To simplify your example, a selector div a { } will match any <a> tag which descends from a <div> tag, regardless of how many levels of ancestry separate the two tags.

That is, div a { } will match any of the following:

<div> <a>...</a> </div>

<div> <h2> <a>...</a> </h2> </div>

<div> <h2> <span> <a>...</a> </span> </h2> </div>

If you want to match an <a> contained directly within a <div> with no other tags separating them, you need to use div > a, which matches only <a> tags that are direct descendants of a <div> tag.

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And all of the examples are a's within span's within div's, so they all match. –  mikeY Dec 23 '11 at 3:22
    
and with a 3 path, no matter how much stuff is between each one, it would work? example: a b c x>e>A>x>o>o>B>y>e>C would work? –  user1022373 Dec 23 '11 at 3:24
    
@TuxedoKnightChess assuming that you're describing a nesting of tags with x>e>A>x>..., then yes. In terms of pattern matching, a b c would be like matching *a*b*c. Any number of tags containing an <a>, with a <b> nested within it at some arbitrary depth, with a <c> nested in that at some arbitrary depth. a > b > c, on the other hand, would be like matching *a b c. –  meagar Dec 23 '11 at 7:25

The way you're thinking uses the > symbol in CSS, which only gets the immediate children. For example, body > div > span > a would behave how you're expecting.

Otherwise, ANY child that matches the selector will be selected. So div a will select any a element under the div, no matter how any levels deep it's located.

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and with a 3 path, no matter how much stuff is between each one, it would work? example: a b c x>e>A>x>o>o>B>y>e>C would work? –  user1022373 Dec 23 '11 at 3:34
    
Assuming your second part was HTML and a b c are the CSS selectors, yeah, you would select C. The best advice though is simply do some experimenting if you're not sure. It'll all make sense soon enough. –  jblasco Dec 23 '11 at 3:38
    
I upvoted all answers because you all helped me with something. Is that bad? could I get banned if a moderator finds out? –  user1022373 Dec 23 '11 at 3:42

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