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I know that you can call an instance method that executes for each object. I also know that you can have a static method on the type that is callable from the type.

But how would one call a method that acts on every instance of a particular type (say, to set a member variable to zero, for example)?

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It's not clear what you mean. Can you provide an example? –  Ani Dec 23 '11 at 4:36
1  
The only way to send a non-static method to an object is to have said target object. C#/.NET does not automatically track "all instances of type X". Generally one has a collection of objects, say, List<MyItem> myItems = ... and then performs operation on all applicable elements, such as foreach (var item in myItems) { item.ClearIt(); }. Note that items need to be put into myItems manually. –  user166390 Dec 23 '11 at 4:37
1  
Short answer, you can't. –  Tomislav Markovski Dec 23 '11 at 4:39
    
if the type is a class , perhaps you can keep track of instances in the constructor , and create a static method to act on every instances. –  dan_l Dec 23 '11 at 4:40
    
@TomislavMarkovski: I'm pretty sure that with the managed debug API, you could find all instances of a particular class. Would be rather hackish though. –  Ben Voigt Dec 23 '11 at 5:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

C# doesn't provide a direct mechanism to track all reachable objects and there's almost never a good reason to want such automatic tracking functionality (rather than, say, an explicit pool that you manage yourself).

But to answer your requirement directly, you'll need to:

  1. Manually track all the reachable instances of the type (perhaps with a set of weak-references to prevent the tracker itself from extending the objects' lifetimes).
  2. Provide a mechanism to (say) perform a side-effect on each member of this set.
  3. Get rid of the associated weak-reference from the set when an object is destroyed. This is necessary to prevent a weak-reference leak.

All of this will have to be done in a thread-safe manner.

public class Foo
{
    private static readonly HashSet<WeakReference> _trackedFoos = new HashSet<WeakReference>();
    private static readonly object _foosLocker = new object();

    private readonly WeakReference _weakReferenceToThis;

    public static void DoForAllFoos(Action<Foo> action)
    {
        if (action == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("action");

        lock (_foosLocker)
        {
            foreach (var foo in _trackedFoos.Select(w => w.Target).OfType<Foo>())
                action(foo);
        }
    }

    public Foo()
    {
       _weakReferenceToThis = new WeakReference(this);

        lock (_foosLocker)
        {
            _trackedFoos.Add(_weakReferenceToThis);
        }
    }

    ~Foo()
    {
        lock (_foosLocker)
        {
            _trackedFoos.Remove(_weakReferenceToThis);
        }
    }
}

Are you sure you need all of this though? This is all really strange and non-deterministic (will be heavily impacted by when garbage-collection occurs).

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If you can modify the type you are talking about, you can create a static List in that class where you keep a reference of every object created.

When you'll run your method, you just have to loop over all that list and run what you want.

If you can't modify that type so you can create this List, you can't do it without some hacks, I can suggest you using the Factory pattern, so you can still keep a List of objects of that type, provided that you use that factory.

Note: If you are not going to access the list with [ ] operator (through an index I mean) but only through a foreach, I suggest you to use a LinkedList which will be far more efficient in this case (lot of add/remove operations, no random access and you'll avoid array resize like list does).

Example:

using System.Linq.Expressions;

class MyClassFactory
{
    LinkedList<MyClass> m_Instances = new LinkedList<MyClass>();

    MyClass Create()
    {
        m_Instances.AddLast(new MyClass());
        return m_Instances.Last.Value;
    }

    void Destroy(MyClass obj)
    {
        m_Instances.Remove(obj);
    }

    void Execute(Expression<Action<MyClass, object>> expr, object param)
    {
        var lambda = expr.Compile();
        foreach (var obj in m_Instances)
            lambda(obj, param);
    }
}

You can then easily instanciate and use always that factory to instanciate your class. It's not a perfect solution, but it's a clean approach to at least work with your problem.

You can use lambda expressions to execute a method on all those instances, there are also other approaches but that is beautiful:

MyFactory f = new MyFactory();
for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    f.Create();
f.Execute((obj, param) =>
{
    //Do something
}, null);

*Edit: * (about Ben Voigt comment)

Weak reference approach, to keep using garbage collection:

using System.Linq.Expressions;

class MyClassFactory
{
    HashSet<WeakReference> m_Instances = new HashSet<WeakReference>();

    MyClass Create()
    {
        var obj = new MyClass();
        m_Instances.Add(new WeakReference(obj));
        return obj;
    }

    void Execute(Expression<Action<MyClass, object>> expr, object param)
    {
        var lambda = expr.Compile();
        // Hope syntax is ok on this line
        m_Instances.RemoveWhere(new Predicate<WeakReference>(obj => !obj.IsAlive));

        foreach (var obj in m_Instances)
            lambda(obj, param);
    }
}

Check RemoveWhere to see it's usage

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2  
This breaks garbage collection. –  Ben Voigt Dec 23 '11 at 5:03
    
There is a destroy method, that's how a Factory should work. if you don't remove those instances it's your fault obviusly. If you don't call a delete in c++, you will create problems to your heap, here is the same. –  Fire-Dragon-DoL Dec 23 '11 at 5:06
    
Requiring manual destruction of each instance is the opposite of garbage collection. –  Ben Voigt Dec 23 '11 at 5:08
    
I prefer this approach, however I'm providing a weak-reference approach. –  Fire-Dragon-DoL Dec 23 '11 at 5:13
1  
Because he doesn't need to search on any object: he says "I have to run a method on all instances of a class". That said, I don't see why he should need to search on them if he said that he have to loop over all them. This is definitely a good situation for a LinkedList, if he likes Create/Destroy methods. –  Fire-Dragon-DoL Dec 23 '11 at 5:26

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