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I have 2 classes that have the exact same logic/workflow, except in one method.

So, I created a abstract base class where the method that differs is declared as abstract.

Below is some sample code to demonstrate my design; can anyone offer suggestions on a better approach or am I heading in the right direction. I didn't use an interface because both derived classes B and C literally share most of the logic. Is there a better way to do what I am doing below via dependency injection?

public abstract class A
{
    public void StageData()
    {
        // some logic
        DoSomething();
    }
    public void TransformData();
    public abstract DoSomething();
}

public class B : A
{
    public override void DoSomething()
    {
        // Do Something!
    }
}

public class C : A
{
    public override void DoSomething()
    {
        // Do Something!
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Sure, that is one C#/Java way of "implementation sharing" (the other is composition/proxies). However, just because both classes share a common ancestor does not mean that interfaces are not useful -- they make it much easier to stub and/or use DI and/or completely replace, etc. –  user166390 Dec 23 '11 at 4:57
    
(I have come to love interfaces because they allow such class-hierarchy/implementation separation: if I was creating a new language I would likely only allow types to be specified by "interface" and encourage interface-specialization.) –  user166390 Dec 23 '11 at 5:04
    
Yeah, I prefer to use interfaces as well for the most part, but how do you deal or reduce the duplicated code logic? –  Abe Dec 23 '11 at 5:09
    
I generally consolidate duplicate code into "state-free" functions (they may invoke callbacks which are not guaranteed as such and they do not necessarily guarantee that the input is not mutated, just that there is no inherent state in the function itself). Functions that only deal with input/output can generally be cleanly accessed from multiple locations. Inheritance gives the "full power" of mucking with instance variables, of course. –  user166390 Dec 23 '11 at 5:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is nothing wrong with what you have done. To introduce dependency injection into this design would be messy and overkill - you would have to pass in a delegate:

public class ABC
{
    public ABC(Action z)
    {
        _doSomethingAction = z;
    }

    public void DoSomething()
    {
        _doSomthingAction.Invoke();
    }


    private Action _doSomthingAction;
}

There would be few reasons why you want to use this approach - one would be if you needed to execute a callback. So stick with the pattern you have, don't try to overcomplicate things.

share|improve this answer
    
Great Point! I want to keep things as simple as possible. I think using interfaces and DI is very useful, but would definitely would be overkill in this specific case. –  Abe Dec 23 '11 at 5:14
    
DI is good, but in this case there is no dependency - DoSomething() doesn't require anything, it is simply a different implementation of the same functionality. –  slugster Dec 23 '11 at 5:19

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