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when using git as the repository, assuming the head is at v1.6

if I find a bug in v1.0

git stash save "interruption "  # is this necessary?
git checkout v1.0
vi badfile.c
git commit -a -m 'bugger fixed'

how is the fix propagated to subsequent versions?

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Either merge with head, rebase onto head, or cherrypick.

Option A:

1.0-----1.6-----merge
  \             /
   \           /
    -fix-------

Option B:

 1.0-----1.6-----fix (rebased)
   \             
    \           
     -fix

Option C:

1.0-----1.6-----fix (cherrypicked)
  \             
   \           
    -fix
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+1 for the 3 ways to do it. –  Noufal Ibrahim Dec 23 '11 at 6:44
    
in each case - merge/rebase/cherrypick - I must go through each branch v1.1 .. v1.6 and apply the merge/rebase/cherrypick. is this right? –  cc young Dec 23 '11 at 8:16
    
yes, if your branches are really like what you say, branches. My answer applies to the case where you have two branches, one with 1.0 as the head, and the other (the latest branch, or master) with 1.6 as the head, since 1.0 to 1.6 correspond to individual tags/commits as the question was originally intended. –  prusswan Dec 23 '11 at 8:24
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The stash (or maybe an interim commit that you can later --amend to) is necessary to switch branches.

You should cut a branch from the tag so git checkout -b v1.0-bugfix v1.0 (I prefer calling the branch something like issue42 where 42 is the bug number).

Then fix the change in badfile.c

git checkout master (assuming you were on master before you switched to v1.0-bugfix.

git merge v1.0-bugfix to get in the changes into the current version. You will have to merge it into the branches where you want the fix to be present.

git stash pop to get back the changes which you kept aside.

The tree will now look something like

          (v1.0-bugfix)--------------------------------------------------(fix badfile)
         /                                                                   \   
        /                                                                     \  
       /                                                                       \ 
o---o---(v1.0)---o---(v1.1)---o---o---(v1.2)---(v1.3)---(v.14)---o---(current-head)---(merge)---(head-with-fix)

I've marked interesting commits with (message) and regular ones with o.

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thanks for the comment on stash. –  cc young Dec 23 '11 at 6:48
    
You're welcome. –  Noufal Ibrahim Dec 23 '11 at 7:14
    
to be clear - fixed on v1.0 and v1.6, but not fixed on v1.0 .. v1.5, unless specifically merged - is that right? –  cc young Dec 23 '11 at 8:45
    
Yup. That's right. –  Noufal Ibrahim Dec 23 '11 at 10:05
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