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Main Question: I have a reference type (object/class) where I would like to specify accessors' implementation details, but I don't want the type to be instantiable, only extendible.

Abstract Classes don't allow bodies to the accessors of Properties as far as I understand, so that makes it trouble some for me.

How would I go about this in the most 'correct' and elegant manner?

Second question: I would also like functionality for overloading accessors if there is a way? One reason is that I have an enum Property, which I want to be settable by using its value (int) or its enum reference type.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think this should do what you want:

public abstract class MyParentClass
{
    public enum MyEnum
    {
        one,
        two,
        three
    }

    private MyEnum _enumeration;

    public string Name { get; private set; }
    public MyEnum Enumeration { get { return this._enumeration; } }
    public void SetEnumeration(string value)
    {
        // ... do something
    }
    public void SetEnumeration(MyEnum value)
    {
        // ... do something
    }
}

There are two overloaded methods for setting the Enumeration property and some methods have their bodies declared whilst the whole class cannot be instantiated.

Hope that helps :)

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Thanks, that will do it! –  Vort3x Dec 23 '11 at 8:38

Abstract Classes don't allow bodies to the accessors of Properties as far as I understand

Yes they do... this is perfectly legal

abstract class MyBaseClass
{
    private int _myProperty;
    public int MyProperty
    {
        get { return _myProperty; }
        set { _myProperty = value; }
    }
}

Perhaps you're confusing abstract classes and interfaces; interfaces can declare members, but they can't provide an implementation for those members.

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I believe I might be confusing them. I am rather new to c# and was reading the documentation. I misunderstood a line in the documentation on msdn that read :"A non-abstract class derived from an abstract class must include actual implementations of all inherited abstract methods and accessors." I assumed, along with the example, that one could not put body in accessors. Thanks for clearing this up. –  Vort3x Dec 23 '11 at 8:35
1  
What you should take from the above quote is that abstract classes can have abstract methods/accessors and if they do then concrete derived classes must provide an implementation, but if the abstract class provides an implementation then the derived class doesn't need to. –  George Duckett Dec 23 '11 at 8:42

Abstract Classes don't allow bodies to the accessors of Properties as far as I understand, so that makes it trouble some for me.

yes they do;

public abstract class Foo
{
    public string Prop
    {
        get { return "yesTheyDo"; }
    }
}

are you marking them abstract?

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You can define the body of methods and properties inside of an abstract class. The abstract part of it essentially just prevents it from being instantiated. To accomplish this, you would write the property as normal:

public string Name
{
    get { return "SomeName"; }
}

As an example. As for allowing overloading of accessors, you could do one of the following:

// By setting this as 'virtual' you can allow classes that inherit from this to override the functionality if they so wish
public virtual string Name
{
    get { return "SomeName"; }
}

// or
public virtual string GetName()
{
    return "SomeName";
}

One tip: if you are wanting the functionality to be overridden and accessible only to classes that inherit the abstract class, use the protected keyword:

protected virtual void DoSomething() { }
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