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As the title says I want to give different bg colors per 2 lists with jQuery... For example:

<li><!-- blue --></li>
<li><!-- blue --></li>
<li><!-- red --></li>
<li><!-- red --></li>

Thanks in advance!

Update: The following code indicates odd and even lists, I wonder if there is a way to target per 2 lists like that... instead of :odd or :even how can I accomplish this?

$("li:odd").addClass("blue");
$("li:even").addClass("red");
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give some detail –  Dau Dec 23 '11 at 9:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/gRjv7/1/

$('li').each(function(index){
    if(Math.floor(index/2)%2==0){
        $(this).css('color','blue');
    }else{
        $(this).css('color','red');
    };
});
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2  
parseInt is not necessary. For future reference, if you use parseInt with unknown numbers, specify the base, to prevent 010 to 8 conversion: parseInt(index, 10). For efficiency, $(this) should also be saved in a variable, to prevent multiple unnecessary function calls. –  Rob W Dec 23 '11 at 9:58
    
Thank you for your answer. –  Nima Dec 23 '11 at 10:04
    
Rob, that's great I'm going to keep that in mind and do it as you say. –  Nima Dec 23 '11 at 10:05
2  
@nima take a look here for more performance tips addyosmani.com/jqprovenperformance –  welldan97 Dec 23 '11 at 10:13
1  
@welldan97 I see, parseInt is used to round the number. Alternative methods to floor a number are: Math.floor(n), n >> 0, n >>> 0` and n << 0. –  Rob W Dec 23 '11 at 10:20

EDIT: In terms of speed, the most efficient jQuery solution (without sacrifying readability):

$("li").each(function(i){
     i = i % 4;
     if (i <= 1) {       // In this context, Equivalent to i == 0 || i == 1
         $(this).addClass("blue");  // If you're going to use multiple
                                    // $(this)s, cache the variable.
     } else {            // Since we're calculating modulo 4, the ELSE condition
         $(this).addClass("red");   // is equivalent to i == 2 || i == 3
     }
});


Use the modulo operator to reduce the set of LIs to 4 (0, 1, 2, 3). Then, use the .filter() method to separate the set in two subsets.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/pN5HT/1/

var allLi = $("li");
var li12 = allLi.filter(function(i){
    i = i % 4;
    return i == 0 || i == 1; // Or return i <= 1;
});
var li34 = allLi.filter(function(i){
    i = i % 4;
    return i == 2 || i == 3; // Or return i >= 2;
});
// Simple demo:
li12.css('background-color','blue');
li34.css('background-color','red');

Instead of hardcoding the styles in the JavaScript, I recommend to use classnames instead:

.blue {background-color:blue;}
.red {background-color:red;}
/*JavaScript:*/ li12.addClass("blue");
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Thanks a lot for your time and sharing. :) –  Nima Dec 23 '11 at 9:59

A similar code approach could be done with jQuery however. If your HTML has a list that you can referecne in the jQuery as follows

<ul class="colors">
<li><!-- blue --></li>
<li><!-- blue --></li>
<li><!-- red --></li>
<li><!-- red --></li>
</ul>

Then you could get this in jQuery.

$(document).ready(function(){
    var i = 0;
    var grouplength = 2;
    var red = false;
    $("ul.colors li").each(function() {
        if(i >= grouplength) {
            red = !red;
            i = 0;
        }
        if(red) {
            this.style.backgroundColor = "#ff0000";
        }
        else {
            this.style.backgroundColor = "#0000ff";
        }
        i++;
    });
});

If you need more colors, you could easily change the "red" from acting as a boolean to a numeric selector and also change the grouping length.

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Just a pretty way to achieve that:

DEMO jsFiddle

$('li').each(function(i){
   $(this).eq(i%4).next().andSelf().addClass('red');
});
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah! I like that, many thanks for sharing! –  Nima Dec 23 '11 at 10:52
1  
@nima :D Glad you like it! quite simple and logic. Happy coding –  Roko C. Buljan Dec 23 '11 at 11:30
    
Sure thing! Thanks dude :) –  Nima Dec 23 '11 at 14:12

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