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How to differentiate between value-type, nullable value-type, enum, nullable-enum, reference-types through reflection?

enum MyEnum
    {
        One,
        Two,
        Three
    }

    class MyClass
    {
        public int IntegerProp { get; set; }
        public int? NullableIntegerProp { get; set; }
        public MyEnum EnumProp { get; set; }
        public MyEnum? NullableEnumProp { get; set; }
        public MyClass ReferenceProp { get; set; }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string propOne = "IntegerProp";
            string propTwo = "NullableIntegerProp";
            string propThree = "EnumProp";
            string propFour = "NullableEnumProp";
            string propFive = "ReferenceProp";

            Type classType = typeof(MyClass);

            PropertyInfo propInfoOne = classType.GetProperty(propOne);
            PropertyInfo propInfoTwo = classType.GetProperty(propTwo);
            PropertyInfo propInfoThree = classType.GetProperty(propThree);
            PropertyInfo propInfoFour = classType.GetProperty(propFour);
            PropertyInfo propInfoFive = classType.GetProperty(propFive);

            propInfoOne.???
            ...............
            ...............
        }
    }

Where in the propInfo...s these information can be retrieved?

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How do you define "basic type"? –  CodesInChaos Dec 23 '11 at 10:06
    
int, float, double........As you can see in MyClass-props. Value-types. –  BROY Dec 23 '11 at 10:06
    
And what about custom structs? For example it's non obvious to me why you want to differentiate enums from other value types. –  CodesInChaos Dec 23 '11 at 10:10
    
en.csharp-online.net/… –  BROY Dec 23 '11 at 10:14
    
There are no value types in the above code, a value type is a struct..this is different to a primitive type. –  Myles McDonnell Dec 23 '11 at 10:24

3 Answers 3

Here is how you check for enum, nullable, primitve and value types;

Console.WriteLine(propInfoOne.PropertyType.IsPrimitive); //true
Console.WriteLine(propInfoOne.PropertyType.IsValueType); //false, value types are structs

Console.WriteLine(propInfoThree.PropertyType.IsEnum); //true

var nullableType = typeof (Nullable<>).MakeGenericType(propInfoThree.PropertyType);
Console.WriteLine(nullableType.IsAssignableFrom(propInfoThree.PropertyType)); //true

Note that value types and primitives are different things. Primitives are simply shorthands that map to types (e.g bool > System.Boolean). Value types are passed by value; they are struct(ure)s not classes.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Programming Hero: can you tell me what the Type.IsPrimitive property indicates then? –  Myles McDonnell Dec 23 '11 at 10:28
2  
@ProgrammingHero that isn't quite true; the primitives generally refers to those with direct IL support; for example, int, short, byte, long, float etc all have direct IL support; operations such as + do not use type operators, but are IL instructions. Contrast, for example, to decimal which is not a primitive. They very much are treated differently. Indeed, on the stack most of them don't even exist: byte, sbyte, short, ushort etc all use int at the IL level (during operations; not as their declaration). –  Marc Gravell Dec 23 '11 at 10:32
2  
@Myles - a better way to check for Nullable<T> is using Nullable.GetUnderlyingType –  Marc Gravell Dec 23 '11 at 10:38
1  
Can someone comment as to why this is not the answer now? –  Myles McDonnell Dec 23 '11 at 11:26
7  
I see that you believe the lie that value types are stored on the stack. Value types are stored on the stack except when they are not stored on the stack, which is almost always. –  Eric Lippert Dec 23 '11 at 15:20
    public void Test(Type desiredType, object value)
    {
        if (desiredType.IsGenericType)
        {
            if (desiredType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))
            {
                if (value == null)
                {
                }
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

The PropertyType.Name seems to be giving different output for Non Nullable and Nullable types. May be this could be a bit of help to you.

Actually it gives Nullable`1 Int32 as the output for Nullable and Non nullable.

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