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For testing purposes, I tried to create an array like this:

byte[] expected = new byte[]{0x2f, 0x0d4, 0xe1, 0xc6, 0x7a, 0x2d, 0x28, 0xfc}

I expected, that java will complain and will ask me to cast every literal here to (byte), but unexpectedly, it asked me only to convert 0x4d, for example, but not 0x2f. The working example:

new byte[]{0x2f, (byte) 0xd4, (byte) 0xe1, (byte) 0xc6, 0x7a, 0x2d, 0x28, (byte) 0xfc}

How does that work?

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I suspect it is because the Java byte is signed, thus you have a range between -128 and 127. So all values >127 (0x80) have to be explicitly converted. –  Lambda Dusk Dec 23 '11 at 10:32
1  
This is the reason; you should post as an answer. –  James McLeod Dec 23 '11 at 10:33
    
I think you mean asked me only to convert 0xd4 not 0x4d –  Peter Lawrey Dec 23 '11 at 10:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I suspect it is because the Java byte is signed, thus you have a range between -128 and 127. So all values >127 (0x80) have to be explicitly converted.

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Yes, seems you're right. Why do they treat byte as signed type? –  Shaman Dec 23 '11 at 10:48
    
Because in the JVM, all the types are signed. Don't ask me why, they seemed to have thought it a good idea in the 90's. It is one of the critic points of the JVM. –  Lambda Dusk Dec 23 '11 at 10:54

Integer literal between -128 to 127 will be automatically converted into target type and Java has signed types only.

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An number literal without a l, d or f is an int value, so values 0x80 and larger have to be cast. One way to cover lots of hex values is to use the following

byte[] bytes = new BigInteger("2fd4e1c67a2d28fc", 16).toByteArray();
System.out.println(Arrays.toString(bytes));

prints

[47, -44, -31, -58, 122, 45, 40, -4]

This avoids some of the tedious , (byte) 0x between values.

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