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In Java, you can load all kinds of resources using the same API but with different URL protocols:

file:///tmp.txt
http://127.0.0.1:8080/a.properties
jar:http://www.foo.com/bar/baz.jar!/COM/foo/Quux.class

This nicely decouples the actual loading of the resource from the application that needs the resource, and since a URL is just a String, resource loading is also very easily configurable.

Is there a protocol to load resources using the current classloader? This is similar to the Jar protocol, except that I do not need to know which jar file or class folder the resource is coming from.

I can do that using Class.getResourceAsStream("a.xml"), of course, but that would require me to use a different API, and hence changes to existing code. I want to be able to use this in all places where I can specify a URL for the resource already, by just updating a property file.

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6  
Spring's Resource abstraction is a much better choice for this... it provides various implementations for different kinds of resources, all accessible via the same interface. static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.0.x/reference/html/… –  skaffman Mar 22 '10 at 0:12
5  
skaffman's link has died, new URL is static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.0.x/… –  Ben J May 7 '11 at 22:59
    
Both links seem to work now. –  hotshot309 Mar 27 '12 at 16:05

8 Answers 8

up vote 235 down vote accepted

Intro and basic Implementation

First up, you're going to need at least a URLStreamHandler. This will actually open the connection to a given URL. Notice that this is simply called Handler; this allows you to specify java -Djava.protocol.handler.pkgs=org.my.protocols and it will automatically be picked up, using the "simple" package name as the supported protocol (in this case "classpath").

Usage

new URL("classpath:org/my/package/resource.extension").openConnection();

Code

package org.my.protocols.classpath;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.URL;
import java.net.URLConnection;
import java.net.URLStreamHandler;

/** A {@link URLStreamHandler} that handles resources on the classpath. */
public class Handler extends URLStreamHandler {
    /** The classloader to find resources from. */
    private final ClassLoader classLoader;

    public Handler() {
        this.classLoader = getClass().getClassLoader();
    }

    public Handler(ClassLoader classLoader) {
        this.classLoader = classLoader;
    }

    @Override
    protected URLConnection openConnection(URL u) throws IOException {
        final URL resourceUrl = classLoader.getResource(u.getPath());
        return resourceUrl.openConnection();
    }
}

Launch issues

If you're anything like me, you don't want to rely on a property being set in the launch to get you somewhere (in my case, I like to keep my options open like Java WebStart - which is why I need all this).

Workarounds/Enhancements

Manual code Handler specification

If you control the code, you can do

new URL(null, "classpath:some/package/resource.extension", new org.my.protocols.classpath.Handler(ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader()))

and this will use your handler to open the connection.

But again, this is less than satisfactory, as you don't need a URL to do this - you want to do this because some lib you can't (or don't want to) control wants urls...

JVM Handler registration

The ultimate option is to register a URLStreamHandlerFactory that will handle all urls across the jvm:

package my.org.url;

import java.net.URLStreamHandler;
import java.net.URLStreamHandlerFactory;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

class ConfigurableStreamHandlerFactory implements URLStreamHandlerFactory {
    private final Map<String, URLStreamHandler> protocolHandlers;

    public ConfigurableStreamHandlerFactory(String protocol, URLStreamHandler urlHandler) {
        protocolHandlers = new HashMap<String, URLStreamHandler>();
        addHandler(protocol, urlHandler);
    }

    public void addHandler(String protocol, URLStreamHandler urlHandler) {
        protocolHandlers.put(protocol, urlHandler);
    }

    public URLStreamHandler createURLStreamHandler(String protocol) {
        return protocolHandlers.get(protocol);
    }
}

To register the handler, call URL.setURLStreamHandlerFactory() with your configured factory. Then do new URL("classpath:org/my/package/resource.extension") like the first example and away you go.

JVM Handler Registration Issue

Note that this method may only be called once per JVM, and note well that Tomcat will use this method to register a JNDI handler (AFAIK). Try Jetty (I will be); at worst, you can use the method first and then it has to work around you!

License

I release this to the public domain, and ask that if you wish to modify that you start a OSS project somewhere and comment here with the details. A better implementation would be to have a URLStreamHandlerFactory that uses ThreadLocals to store URLStreamHandlers for each Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader(). I'll even give you my modifications and test classes.

Now give me lots of up-votes! :)

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13  
"Now give me lots of up-votes." I have but one... –  Thilo Nov 20 '09 at 9:59
1  
You've also got a big tick in your arsenal - have I not done enough? ;( –  Stephen Nov 20 '09 at 11:05
    
@Stephen this is exactly what I'm looking for. Can you please share your updates with me? I can include as part of my com.github.fommil.common-utils package that I plan to update and release soon via Sonatype. –  fommil Feb 17 '13 at 14:59
1  
Note that you can also use System.setProperty() to register the protocol. Like System.setProperty("java.protocol.handler.pkgs", "org.my.protocols"); –  tsauerwein Jun 5 '14 at 15:24
URL url = getClass().getClassLoader().getResource("someresource.xxx");

That should do it.

Regards

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4  
"I can do that using Class.getResourceAsStream("a.xml"), of course, but that would require me to use a different API, and hence changes to existing code. I want to be able to use this in all places where I can specify a URL for the resource already, by just updating a property file." –  Thilo Jan 5 '11 at 1:10
1  
-1 As pointed out by Thilo, this is something the OP considered and rejected. –  sleske Aug 16 '11 at 13:10
8  
getResource and getResourceAsStream are different methods. Agreed that getResourceAsStream doesn't fit with the API, but getResource returns a URL, which is exactly what OP asked for. –  romacafe Aug 23 '11 at 13:57
1  
Thank you for this answer. –  vikingsteve Jun 19 '13 at 12:20
3  
I think this is the right answer. It avoids all the configuration mess. –  Agustí Sánchez Feb 12 '14 at 10:56

You can also set the property programmatically during startup:

final String key = "java.protocol.handler.pkgs";
String newValue = "org.my.protocols";
if (System.getProperty(key) != null) {
    final String previousValue = System.getProperty(key);
    newValue += "|" + previousValue;
}
System.setProperty(key, newValue);

Using this class:

package org.my.protocols.classpath;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.URL;
import java.net.URLConnection;
import java.net.URLStreamHandler;

public class Handler extends URLStreamHandler {

    @Override
    protected URLConnection openConnection(final URL u) throws IOException {
        final URL resourceUrl = ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader().getResource(u.getPath());
        return resourceUrl.openConnection();
    }
}

Thus you get the least intrusive way to do this. :) java.net.URL will always use the current value from the system properties.

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1  
The code which adds extra package for lookup to java.protocol.handler.pkgs system variable can only be used if the handler aimed to process not yet "known" protocol such as gopher://. If the intention is to override "popular" protocol, like file:// or http://, it could be too late to do it, as java.net.URL#handlers map is already added a "standard" handler for that protocol. So the only way out is to pass this variable to JVM. –  dma_k Nov 20 '14 at 14:46

I think this is worth its own answer - if you're using Spring, you already have this with

Resource firstResource =
    context.getResource("http://www.google.fi/");
Resource anotherResource =
    context.getResource("classpath:some/resource/path/myTemplate.txt");

Like explained in the spring documentation and pointed out in the comments by skaffman.

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I've created a class which helps to reduce errors in setting up custom handlers and takes advantage of the system property so there are no issues with calling a method first or not being in the right container. There's also an exception class if you get things wrong:

CustomURLScheme.java:
/*
 * The CustomURLScheme class has a static method for adding cutom protocol
 * handlers without getting bogged down with other class loaders and having to
 * call setURLStreamHandlerFactory before the next guy...
 */
package com.cybernostics.lib.net.customurl;

import java.net.URLStreamHandler;
import java.util.regex.Matcher;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

/**
 * Allows you to add your own URL handler without running into problems
 * of race conditions with setURLStream handler.
 * 
 * To add your custom protocol eg myprot://blahblah:
 * 
 * 1) Create a new protocol package which ends in myprot eg com.myfirm.protocols.myprot
 * 2) Create a subclass of URLStreamHandler called Handler in this package
 * 3) Before you use the protocol, call CustomURLScheme.add(com.myfirm.protocols.myprot.Handler.class);
 * @author jasonw
 */
public class CustomURLScheme
{

    // this is the package name required to implelent a Handler class
    private static Pattern packagePattern = Pattern.compile( "(.+\\.protocols)\\.[^\\.]+" );

    /**
     * Call this method with your handlerclass
     * @param handlerClass
     * @throws Exception 
     */
    public static void add( Class<? extends URLStreamHandler> handlerClass ) throws Exception
    {
        if ( handlerClass.getSimpleName().equals( "Handler" ) )
        {
            String pkgName = handlerClass.getPackage().getName();
            Matcher m = packagePattern.matcher( pkgName );

            if ( m.matches() )
            {
                String protocolPackage = m.group( 1 );
                add( protocolPackage );
            }
            else
            {
                throw new CustomURLHandlerException( "Your Handler class package must end in 'protocols.yourprotocolname' eg com.somefirm.blah.protocols.yourprotocol" );
            }

        }
        else
        {
            throw new CustomURLHandlerException( "Your handler class must be called 'Handler'" );
        }
    }

    private static void add( String handlerPackage )
    {
        // this property controls where java looks for
        // stream handlers - always uses current value.
        final String key = "java.protocol.handler.pkgs";

        String newValue = handlerPackage;
        if ( System.getProperty( key ) != null )
        {
            final String previousValue = System.getProperty( key );
            newValue += "|" + previousValue;
        }
        System.setProperty( key, newValue );
    }
}


CustomURLHandlerException.java:
/*
 * Exception if you get things mixed up creating a custom url protocol
 */
package com.cybernostics.lib.net.customurl;

/**
 *
 * @author jasonw
 */
public class CustomURLHandlerException extends Exception
{

    public CustomURLHandlerException(String msg )
    {
        super( msg );
    }

}
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(Similar to Azder's answer, but a slightly different tact.)

I don't believe there is a predefined protocol handler for content from the classpath. (The so-called classpath: protocol).

However, Java does allow you to add your own protocols. This is done through providing concrete implementations java.net.URLStreamHandler and java.net.URLConnection.

This article describes how a custom stream handler can be implemented: http://java.sun.com/developer/onlineTraining/protocolhandlers/.

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4  
Do you know of a list of what protocols ship with the JVM ? –  Thilo May 14 '09 at 6:21

An extension to Dilums's answer:

Without changing code, you likely need pursue custom implementations of URL related interfaces as Dilum recommends. To simplify things for you, I can recommend looking at the source for Spring Framework's Resources. While the code is not in the form of a stream handler, it has been designed to do exactly what you are looking to do and is under the ASL 2.0 license, making it friendly enough for re-use in your code with due credit.

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That page you reference states that "there is no standardized URL implementation that may be used to access a resource that needs to be obtained from the classpath, or relative to a ServletContext", which answers my question, I guess. –  Thilo May 14 '09 at 22:35
    
@Homeless: hang in there, young man. With a little more experience, you'll soon be posting comments in no time. –  Cuga May 15 '09 at 14:25

I dont know if there is one already, but you can make it yourself easilly.

That different protocols example looks to me like a facade pattern. You have a common interface when there are different implementations for each case.

You could use the same principle, make a ResourceLoader class which takes the string from your properties file, and checks for a custom protocol of ours

myprotocol:a.xml
myprotocol:file:///tmp.txt
myprotocol:http://127.0.0.1:8080/a.properties
myprotocol:jar:http://www.foo.com/bar/baz.jar!/COM/foo/Quux.class

strips the myprotocol: from the start of the string and then makes a decision of which way to load the resource, and just gives you the resource.

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This doesnt work if you want a third party lib uses URLs and you perhaps want to handle resolution of resources for a particular protocol. –  mP. May 6 '10 at 6:55

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