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Is there any API or method to prevent read access on a dynamic allocated memory?

char *ptr = malloc(4);`
strcpy(ptr, "Hello");`

Now, i wish to ptr to have no read access and write-protected. How to accomplish this?

I do not wish to use mprotect as it will expect ptr to point to mapped memory, and ampping a dynamic memory every time may not be possible.

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Just don't make the pointer visible to other code? –  fge Dec 23 '11 at 11:13
    
@fge: No, that can't be possible. It needs to be made visible. But no read-write access. How to accomplish it? –  kingsmasher1 Dec 23 '11 at 11:15
    
Why is mmap not an option? It gives you exactly a number of pages which you can mprotect. In order to preserve memory usage, you could group all of these read-only strings together in the protected pages. –  Blagovest Buyukliev Dec 23 '11 at 11:26
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@kingsmasher1: google for MAP_ANONYMOUS. –  Blagovest Buyukliev Dec 23 '11 at 11:33
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@kingsmasher1, I don't know for sure what your goal is, so I can't say what something else would be. "protect memory" is not usually a high-level goal, but some approach to that goal. Tell us what type of program you're writing, are you debugging, writing a driver, doing testing, or something else. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Dec 23 '11 at 11:45

1 Answer 1

mprotect is still the answer. You need a page-aligned allocation with no allocator control information that may need to be writeable -- so allocate your memory by mmaping anonymous memory.

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Every time mapping a dynamically allocated memory, does it have a system overhead or cons? I think it surely has. Also huge memory wastage because one call to malloc will mean allocating a full page. Right? –  kingsmasher1 Dec 23 '11 at 11:26
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@kingsmasher1: you don't have to call mmap everytime you need to store a 5-character string. Call mmap once to allocate a number of pages, and then store the strings sequentially there until the memory is exhausted. Then you may need to call mmap again for more pages. –  Blagovest Buyukliev Dec 23 '11 at 11:30
    
@BlagovestBuyukliev: Please see my comment above, about why i wish to avoid this. –  kingsmasher1 Dec 23 '11 at 11:41

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