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I want to display a number (1..n) of pie charts. If the screen is large enough I'd like to display two to a line, but if not each one needs to be 100% width. Is this possible with just CSS? If not, what's the cleanest way to achieve it?

My current attempt is setting the min-width of the pie chart divs to the width available on the smallest screen size we are supporting (which leaves 500px available), so something like this:

div.piechart {
  min-width: 500px;
  width: 50%;
  float:left;
}

This works for the smallest screen size and it works for screens with > 1000px available, but with > 500 and < 1000 it doesn't work.

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Which browser version are you trying to support? –  Robert Koritnik Dec 23 '11 at 12:00
    
The current and most recent previous version of Chrome, Firefox and IE. –  Russell Dec 23 '11 at 12:04
    
Better if you use the serve-side language to check the screen and loads a certain css file. –  Toping Dec 23 '11 at 12:07
1  
What if they resize the browser window? –  Russell Dec 23 '11 at 12:08
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First solution supported by all browsers

This solution is supported in all browsers. Use floating (or inline-block) along with defined element dimensions. Whenever there's enough available content there will be more elements per row, but when content size is to narrow it will adopt accordingly.

.item
{
    display: inline-block;
    // or
    float: left;

    width: 300px;
}

Second solution for latest browsers

This one uses different CSS settings for different browser window size. to be continued

This blog post outlines this functionality pretty neatly and basically does this:

<link rel="stylesheet" media="screen and (min-device-width: 800px)" href="800.css" />

Third solution is using Javascript

You can always resort to Javascript in the end to support older browsers and also have your elements with exactly 50% or 100% width setting.

I would do it this way:

.item
{
    display: inline-block;
    width: 100%;
}

.small
{
    width: 50% !important;
}

!important rule is only needed if resizable elements' styles that define their widths are defined afterwards. If .small is the last one you can omit !important rule.

Then have items defined as:

<div class="item resizable">...</div>

And with the help of a library like jQuery or similar attach a window resize event handler to check browser window width and add/remove additional CSS classes to resizable elements:

var width = ...
if (width < 1000)
{
    $(".item.resizable").addClass("small");
}
else
{
    $(".item.resizable").removeClass("small");
}

Or write less lines of code if you know what you're doing:

var width = ...
var e = $(".item.resizable");
width < 1000 && e.addClass("small") || e.removeClass("small");
share|improve this answer
    
Your first solution is essentially a fixed width version of what I have now - but I really need the widths to be either 50% or 100%... –  Russell Dec 23 '11 at 12:16
    
Thanks for the link about screen size dependant stylesheets - I didn't know about that. Unfortunately I have to support the most recent previous version of each of the major browsers and as far as I can see this won't work on IE8. Here's to the future though! –  Russell Dec 23 '11 at 12:36
    
@Russell: I've also added third solution that uses a little bit of Javascript. –  Robert Koritnik Dec 23 '11 at 12:58
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If the elements can be displayed inline (display:inline;), you should just be able to leave them like that (with a fixed width), and the browser should fit them onto two lines when the size reduces.

To see what I mean, try opening this as HTML, and then resizing the browser a bit:
<html> <body> <span style="width:500px; background-color:blue;">1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111</span> <span style="width:500px; background-color:red;">22222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222</span> </body> </html>

Other than that, you would probably need to use Javascript.

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Wouldn't it be better if you'd rather created a JSFiddle and provided a link to it? –  Robert Koritnik Dec 23 '11 at 12:13
    
I don't want fixed width elements, I want them to be either 50% or 100% width. –  Russell Dec 23 '11 at 12:14
1  
So they're both 50%, until the screen size is > XX. Oh, well then you need JS. Look at Robert Koritnik's answer above. @Robert Yes, it probably would. I'll do that next time. –  ACarter Dec 23 '11 at 13:02
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Unless anyone can tell me a better way (please do!) of doing this I'm going to do it with jQuery:

In $(document).ready():

$(window).resize(function() {
  if ($(this).width() >= 1300){
    $('div.piechart').addClass('fifty');    
  } else {
    $('div.piechart.fifty').removeClass('fifty');
  } 
}).resize();

And in the CSS:

div.piechart {
  width: 100%;
}

div.piechart.fifty {
  width: 50%;
  float: left;
}
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You should use media queries to do this:

See: http://jsfiddle.net/thirtydot/Y97QL/show/ (change the width of the browser window)

.piechart {
    width: 100%;
}
@media screen and (min-width: 1300px) {
    .piechart {
        width: 50%;
        float: left;
    }
}

Some older browsers (IE7/8) do not support media queries.

If you need to support those browsers, you should include a JavaScript polyfill, such as Respond.js.

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