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I want to convert this php code snippet that converts/truncates a value:

here is the php code:

$currentcost = 42.35;
$currentcost = explode(".", $currentcost);

if($currentcost[1] <= 35) {
$currentcost[1] = 99;
$currentcost[0] -= 1;
}
echo $output = $currentcost[0] . "." . $currentcost[1]; 

This is supposed to be the condition:

x.35 where x is any number. If the decimal number is less than or equal to 35 then convert the .35 into 99 and subtract the x value with 1.

Something like this:

42.35 will become 41.99

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by the way, 8 questions and no accepts - why is that? no acceptable answers found yet ;)? –  RandolphCarter Dec 23 '11 at 13:04
    
and what have you tried here so far? –  RandolphCarter Dec 23 '11 at 13:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to port it to Javascript as is (without the % optimization as shown in the other answer here), then have a look at the array.split method documentation. It should work like this:

var currentcost = 42.35;
var costpart = String(currentcost).split(".");
if (costpart[1] <= 35) {
    costpart[1] = 99;
    costpart[0] -= 1;
}
var output = costpart[0] + "." + costpart[1];
document.write(output);
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Thank you so much. It works to me! –  jovazel Dec 23 '11 at 13:11

Here you go, it uses the modulo operator to get the decimal part of the number:

var currentcost = 42.35;

if ( (currentcost*100) % 100 <= 35) {
  currentcost = Math.floor(currentcost) - 0.01;
}

document.write(currentcost);

Edit: For an explanation on the way floating point values are handled here, see this question.

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Hm, that doesn't seem to work (see jsfiddle.net/L9ksC); first, it should be <=, instead of <, and second, it seems the numerical accuracy in javascript prevents 42.35 % 1 <= 0.35 from being true... –  RandolphCarter Dec 23 '11 at 13:14
    
the new solution is even worse - Math.ceil returns the nearest integer, meaning the part before % 1 in the if condition will always be 0 (which is smaller then 0.35), meaning it will always return next smaller integer, with .99 after comma ... and I think %1 doesn't work as you think it does (and not as I thought at first too). –  RandolphCarter Dec 23 '11 at 13:28
    
@nyarlathotep: yeah that was wrong, I don't think I can get away from the floating point error, appart doing something silly like <= 0.350000000014 or <= 0.36 –  RageZ Dec 23 '11 at 13:33
    
true, floating point variables are always tricky ;). For ideas on how to get it work (would be a nicer solution after all: stackoverflow.com/questions/3966484/…) Multiplying before modulo seems to do the trick, as you tried, but without the division and without Math.ceil... –  RandolphCarter Dec 23 '11 at 13:38
    
actually < 0.36 make the trick if you are manipulating money ;-) –  RageZ Dec 23 '11 at 13:40

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