Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I have class B derived from class A

Is it possible to invoke overrided method of A like this?

class A
  def method1
  end
  def method2
  end
end

class B < A
  def method1
  ### invoke method2 of class A is what I want to do here
  end
  def method2
  end
end

# not exactly duplicate to How do I call an overridden parent class method from a child class? , but we seem want to do the same thing.

share|improve this question
3  
Did you mean for B to be a subclass of A in your example code? –  sepp2k Dec 23 '11 at 13:07
1  
if b is a subclass of a then you can simply call super from within your b mehtod. –  three Dec 23 '11 at 13:10
1  
No, he needs to call super's method2 from descendant's method1. There's no way (that I know of) in Ruby to do this. –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 23 '11 at 13:21
2  
@SergeiTulentsev Assuming he did mean for B to inherit from A, there is a way. But the way it is now, there isn't. –  sepp2k Dec 23 '11 at 13:22
    
Assuming that class B < A, could you show the code? I am curious. –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 23 '11 at 13:26
show 3 more comments

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I'm assuming here that B is supposed to inherit from A and you simply made a typo in your example code. If this is not the case, there is no way to do what you want.

Otherwise you can do what you want using reflection by binding A's method2 instance method to your current B object and calling it like this:

class A
  def method1
  end
  def method2
  end
end

class B < A
  def method1
    A.instance_method(:method2).bind(self).call
  end
  def method2
  end
end

Note though that you shouldn't pull out the big black-magic-guns like this unless you really need to. In most cases redesigning your class hierarchy so that you don't need to do this is the better alternative.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. One more magic trick up my sleeve :-) –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 23 '11 at 14:36
    
+1 I would've posted the same thing. I also think this should rarely, if ever, need to be used. Why override A#method2 if you still need it in B? I only use the bind trick when trying to troubleshoot method behaviors, e.g. in irb. –  Kelvin Dec 26 '11 at 21:47
add comment

You can create a synonym for parent method using alias statement and call it from the overriden method:

class A
  def method1
    puts '1'
  end
  def method2
    puts '2'
  end
end

class B < A
  alias parent_method1 method1
  alias parent_method2 method2
  def method1
    parent_method2
  end
  def method2
  end
end

b = B.new
b.method1 # => 2
share|improve this answer
add comment

The answer of @sepp2k is technically correct, however I would like to explain why this technique is not appropriate in my opinion (so the question is technically interesting, but leads to the wrong goal):

  • Ruby does not allow to call super.method2 in the context of method1called in an instance of B, because it is just wrong to do it. Class inheritance should be used when your instances are specializations of the superclass. That includes that you normally only expand behavior, by calling super and doing something additionally before or after that call.
  • There are languages like Java and others, that allow to call super for another method, and that leads to something similar to spaghetti code, but the object-oriented way. No one understands when which methods are called, so try to avoid it.

So try to find the reason why you want to change the call, and fix that. If your method1 in A is wrong implemented in B, then you should not subclass is.

share|improve this answer
    
"Even when thinking the answer of @sepp2k is correct" Is there any reason to think that it isn't? –  sepp2k Dec 23 '11 at 13:46
    
Sorry, I wanted to express that your answer is technically correct, but the question in itself has deficiencies. I will correct it, sorry for that misunderstanding. –  mliebelt Dec 23 '11 at 14:06
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.