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I'm learning Ruby by reading Programming Ruby, the Pragmatic Programmers Guide. I really like how terse the syntax is.

I can't understand the role of the = in setter method names:

def price=(new_price)
    @price = new_price
end

How is that function definition any different than this:

def price(new_price)

What difference does = make? The book says it makes direct assignment possible. But it's already possible with a normal setter method that does not have a =... ?

Here's the rest of the class:

class BookInStock
    attr_reader    :isbn
    attr_accessor  :price

    def initialize(isbn, price)
        @isbn = isbn
        @price = Float(price)
    end
end

book.price = book.price * 0.75
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It gives you 'syntactical sugar' to write code as follows:

class Book
    price=(new_price)
       @price = new_price
       # do something else
    end
end

book = Book.new

book.price = 1

This code will be translated to

book.price=(1)

Actually attr_writer and attr_accessor methods generate setter (price=) methods for your class (attr_reader and attr_accessor generates getter methods as well).
So your BookInStock class is similar to:

class BookInStock
    def isbn val
        @isbn = val
    end

    def price val
        @price
    end
    def price= val
        @price = val
    end

    def initialize(isbn, price)
        @isbn = isbn
        @price = Float(price)
    end
end

You need to write methods with = only if you are going to add some logic into it (like validation). In other cases just use attr_writer or attr_accessor.

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Ahh! I get it! So it allows you to make instance variable assignments outside of the class without having to call the setter method explicitly, like in Java, for example? –  Mohamad Dec 23 '11 at 13:24
    
I understand what you meant now. Thanks. It's handy way to include extra logic into the method. Otherwise we can rely on attr_accessor to do the trick. Thanks! The syntax of Ruby is a little strange for me, but I really like how clean it is. –  Mohamad Dec 23 '11 at 13:28
    
You define your setter method with name that ends with = and then call this setter with the syntax similar to variable assignment. And your setter method assigns value to the instance variable. –  Alex Kliuchnikau Dec 23 '11 at 13:29

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