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wmi c# - WMI Giving Incorrect Voltage Readings

Firstly, is it possible to use C, C++ or Assembly DLLs with C#?
If it is, would I simply add a reference to this DLL, or would I have to P/Invoke it?

Now, onto the main question.
I have noticed that, when using WMI with C# to retrieve information, on certain architectures and processors the information is either completely inaccurate, or is simply not there. I was wondering if, should the above question be possible, using C, C++ or Assembly would yield better results.

If it would, what I need write, how would I need to write it, and, if using assembly, how would I compile it into a DLL? Thanks for any answers.

WMI does not provide "CurrentVoltage" or "VoltageCaps" http://i.imgur.com/nNc8C.jpg

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marked as duplicate by Frédéric Hamidi, JPBlanc, Hans Passant, Incognito, hirschhornsalz Dec 23 '11 at 17:30

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
You can call C/C++ code in various ways, such as using a COM interface, a managed C++ (C++/CLI) DLL, or by using P/Invoke. –  Samuel Slade Dec 23 '11 at 13:33
4  
When using WMI with C# to retrieve information, on certain architectures and processors the information is either completely inaccurate, or is simply not there. Well, that might be a problem with the WMI provider, not with the language you're using to query it. Can you elaborate on that missing or inaccurate information? –  Frédéric Hamidi Dec 23 '11 at 13:34
    
When using C# with WMI, and querying the processor for "CurrentVoltage" I have noticed that on Sandybridge and Yorkfield architectures the voltage comes up as null or 0. On another processor, using the Penryn architecture, voltage came up as 3.3v. –  Liam McSherry Dec 23 '11 at 13:41
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There is an interesting discussion about that here –  JPBlanc Dec 23 '11 at 13:48
    
@JPBlanc, ah, that's a dupe then. Nice catch :) –  Frédéric Hamidi Dec 23 '11 at 13:49
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1 Answer

I don't think your problem comes from the language you're using to query WMI.

The documentation for the CurrentVoltage property says:

Voltage of the processor. If the eighth bit is set, bits 0-6 contain the voltage multiplied by 10. If the eighth bit is not set, then the bit setting in VoltageCaps represents the voltage value. CurrentVoltage is only set when SMBIOS designates a voltage value.

So, querying the VoltageCaps property on the Sandy Bridge / Yorkfield systems (since CurrentVoltage's eighth bit is not set) should solve your problem.

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Quite same answer as this one –  JPBlanc Dec 23 '11 at 13:50
    
Yup, I did not see the duplicate before you mentioned it. I'm split between deleting this or leaving it, since I voted to close the question as a dupe anyway. –  Frédéric Hamidi Dec 23 '11 at 13:51
    
This question is not about it giving incorrect results, but more about how to retrieve said information using a different, lower-down, language. Also, using VoltageCaps does not work. –  Liam McSherry Dec 23 '11 at 13:53
    
@Liam, that's interesting. What does VoltageCaps return? –  Frédéric Hamidi Dec 23 '11 at 13:54
    
VoltageCaps returns a blank space. You can see that illustrated in this picture: i.imgur.com/nNc8C.jpg –  Liam McSherry Dec 23 '11 at 14:38
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