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If a user performs an operation, such as deleting items, it removes them from the UI right away and then deletes them from the database on a background thread using TPL. The problem is if the user exits the application before the background thread finishes, the item never actually gets deleted.

Is there a standard way of waiting for async operations to finish before shutting down the application?

My async calls look like this:

if (MyObjectList.Contains(obj)) MyObjectList.Remove(obj);
Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DAL<MyEntities>.DeleteObject(obj));

Update

Here's the final code I went with. I'm quite happy to see it works as it should, although let me know if I can improve it. I still have a lot to learn :)

public partial class App : Application
{
    private List<Task> _backgroundTasks = new List<Task>();

    public App()
    {
        EventSystem.Subscribe<TaskStartedMessage>((e) =>
        {
            _backgroundTasks.Add(e.Task);
        });

        EventSystem.Subscribe<TaskEndedMessage>((e) =>
        {
            if (_backgroundTasks.Contains(e.Task))
                _backgroundTasks.Remove(e.Task);
        });
    }

    protected override void OnExit(ExitEventArgs e)
    {
        Task.WaitAll(_backgroundTasks.Where(p => !p.IsCompleted).ToArray(), 30000);

        base.OnExit(e);
    }
}

And when starting an important background task, I'm using this syntax:

var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DAL<MyEntities>.DeleteObject(obj));
EventSystem.Publish<TaskStartedMessage>(new TaskStartedMessage(task));
await task;
EventSystem.Publish<TaskEndedMessage>(new TaskEndedMessage(task));

I'm using AsyncCTP for await/async, and Microsoft Prism's EventAggregator for the event system.

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1  
The final code looks good, however i'd remove the foreach and replace it with: Task.WaitAll(_backgroundTasks.ToArray()); I can't think of a way your implementation could cause trouble, but I'm guessing that if they implemented that static method, they had a point. –  Baboon Dec 23 '11 at 14:52
    
@Baboon Thanks, I didn't know there was a Task.WaitAll() method I could use on a list of Tasks –  Rachel Dec 23 '11 at 15:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

There is no standard way but since you create a specific Task here it should be easy to put that in a List and build some Exit-logic to Wait for all Tasks in that List.

OK, a sample. Untested and incomplete:

// untested
static class CriticalTasks
{
    static HashSet<Task> tasks = new HashSet<Task>();
    static object locker = new object();

    // when starting a Task
    public static void Add(Task t)
    {
        lock(locker)
           tasks.Add(t);
    }

    // When a Tasks completes
    public static void Remove(Task t)
    {
        lock(locker)
           tasks.Remove(t);
    }

    // Having to call Remove() is not so convenient, this is a blunt solution. 
    // call it regularly
    public static void Cleanup()
    {
        lock(locker)
           tasks.RemoveWhere(t => t.Status != TaskStatus.Running);
    }

    // from Application.Exit() or similar. 
    public static void WaitOnExit()
    {
        // filter, I'm not sure if Wait() on a canceled|completed Task would be OK
        var waitfor = tasks.Where(t => t.Status == TaskStatus.Running).ToArray();
        Task.WaitAll(waitfor, 5000);
    }
}


The drawback is that you will have to extend each Task with the code to Add & Remove it.

Forgetting a Remove() (eg when an Exception happens) would be a (small) memory-leak. It is not too critical, instead of burdening your code with using() blocks you could also periodically run a Cleanup() method that uses HashSet.RemoveWhere() to remove non-running tasks.

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Can you provide an example? –  Rachel Dec 23 '11 at 14:20
    
Thank you :) I like to see code samples because it it points me in the right direction and often I can learn new things from them. –  Rachel Dec 23 '11 at 14:49
    
@Rachel, OK, but I now realize you need to make it thread-safe. I'll edit in little while. –  Henk Holterman Dec 23 '11 at 14:57
var x = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DAL<MyEntities>.DeleteObject(obj));

In form close event:

while(!x.IsCompleted){hide form}

Or

if(!x.IsCompleted)
   //cancel exit
share|improve this answer
    
I really suggest to avoid this spinning that will raise a core to 100% –  Felice Pollano Dec 23 '11 at 15:41

You could store reference to your Task, and wait for it when application is quitting (on Exit events for example).

You could also create a normal thread, make sure you set IsBackground to false (default value). Process will not quit until all non-background threads will finish their work, so it will run to the end, you will have to watch out not to use any GUI logic or make sure that you will not dispose objects that you need from this thread.

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The whole point of running it on a background thread is to prevent it from locking up the UI while it deletes the object. Wouldn't this just run the delete code on the main thread and lock up the UI? –  Rachel Dec 23 '11 at 14:22
    
@Rachel: Thead being background has nothing to do if it's background to UI or not. Background thread is a thread that should be terminated when all non-background threads exit. Non-background thread will continue with it's work. So it you run your database logic on non-background thread it will finish its work indepedently of your main UI. –  Marcin Deptuła Dec 23 '11 at 14:29
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Web;
using System.Net;
using System.IO;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    sealed class TaskList 
    {
        private static List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>(15);
        public static Task<T> Task<T>(Task<T> task)
        {
            lock(tasks)
            {
                tasks.Add(task);
            }
            return task;
        }

        public static Task Task(Task result)
        {
            lock (tasks)
            {
                tasks.Add(result);
            }
            return result; 
        }

        public static void WaitAll()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Finalizing tasks...");
            lock (tasks)
            {
                while (tasks.Exists(t => !t.IsCompleted))
                {
                    tasks.RemoveAll(t => t.IsCompleted);
                }
            }
        }
    }
    class Program
    {

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            Response();
            Console.WriteLine("done.");
            TaskList.WaitAll();
        }

        public async static void Response()
        {
            WebClient client = new WebClient();
            client.Headers.Add("User-Agent:foo-agent");

            Console.WriteLine(await TaskList.Task(client.DownloadStringTaskAsync(@"http://localhost/slow/task")));            

        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
could you add some description about you answer? –  benka Jul 19 '14 at 16:53

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