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I have text file of this kind

File 1
-------
ABC 123
DEF 456
GHI 111

And I have another file

File 2
------
stringaa ttt stringbb yyy

Ouput
-----
stringaa ABC stringbb 123
stringaa DEF stringbb 456
stringaa GHI stringbb 111

Reading the file File 1 update File2 such that the Ouput is produced, any ideas.

share|improve this question
    
What exactly do you mean by "reading file1 update file2 such that output is produced"? That you must change file2 only while reading file1? That you cannot read file2? what? –  Vinko Vrsalovic May 14 '09 at 6:15
    
It might be better to indicate what each field means. –  Brad Gilbert Jul 22 '09 at 21:31

5 Answers 5

use strict;
use warnings;

my ($file1, $file2) = @ARGV;
open F, $file2 or die "Can't open $file2: $!\n";
$_ = <F>; # File2 should have one line only
close F;

die "$file2 in unexpected format for second file '$_'\n" unless /(\w+)\s\w+\s(\w+)/;
my ($stra, $strb) = ($1, $2);

open F, $file1 or die "Can't open $file1: $!\n";
while(<F>)
{
    s/(\w+)\s(\d+)/$stra $1 $strb $2/;
        print;
}
share|improve this answer

Try this:

my $file1 = shift @ARGV;
my $file2 = shift @ARGV;

open F2, $file2 or die $!;
chomp(my $template = <F2>);
my @fields = split/\s+/,$template;
close F2;

open F1, $file1 or die $!;
while (<F1>) {
    chomp;
    ($val1,$val2) = split/\s+/;
    print join("\t",$fields[0],$val1,$fields[2],$val2),"\n";

}
close F1;
share|improve this answer

This code is more verbose than the other suggestions posted here.

But it has several advantages:

  • It is commented.
  • It uses lexical filehandles and 3 argument open().
  • Variable names are descriptive and not file1 and file2.
  • It is more flexible
    • Easy to add/modify replacement fields.
    • Easy to process multiple data files in one script
    • Easy to apply same data to multiple specifications
  • Does not split or modify the specification except to make substitutions.

While this has no bearing on whether this a good design to use in practical terms, this code demonstrates several useful techniques.

  • It generates closures to handle the formatting.
  • It uses atomic exception handling instead of the flawed eval {}; if ($@) { ...handle exception... } idiom.


#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

# Supply test data - remove from real code.
my $test_data = <<'END';
ABC 123
DEF 456
GHI 111
JKL
MNO 999 888
END

my $test_spec = <<'END';
stringaa ttt stringbb yyy
END

# Use test data if no files specified.
# works because you can open() a scalar ref as a file.
# remove from real code -> should display usage information and die.
my $file_data = shift @ARGV || \$test_data;
my $file_spec = shift @ARGV || \$test_spec;

# List of tokens to replace in spec file.
# Real code should probably take list of tokens as argument.
my @replace = qw( ttt yyy );

my $spec   = Read_Spec_From_File( $file_spec );
my $format = Make_Formatter( $spec, @replace );
Print_Formatted_Data( $format, $file_data );

exit;

# -----------------------------------------------------------


# Read a specification from a file.
sub Read_Spec_From_File {
    my $file = shift;   # path to file

    open( my $fh, '<', $file )
        or die "Unable to open format specification file '$file' - $!\n";

    my $spec;

    local $_;
    while( <$fh> ) {

        die "Specification file format error - too many lines.\n"
            if defined $spec;

        $spec = $_;
    }

    die "Specification file format error - no specification.\n"
        unless defined $spec;


    return $spec;
}

# Create a formatting function that can be used to apply data to a
# specification.
#
# Formatting function takes a list of data values to apply to replacement
# tokens.
#
# Given spec 'word aaa blah bbb cheese ccc bar aaa'
# With token list is 'aaa', 'bbb', 'ccc',
# and data 111, 222, 333
# The result is 'word 111 blah 222 cheese 333 bar 111'
# 
sub Make_Formatter {
    my $spec = shift;
    my @replacement_tokens = @_;

    # formatter expects a list of data values.
    return sub {
        my $new_line = $spec;

        die "More data than tokens\n" 
            if @_ > @replacement_tokens;

        for ( 0..$#replacement_tokens ) {

            my $token = $replacement_tokens[$_];
            my $value = $_[$_];


            if ( not defined $value ) {
                die "No data for '$token'\n"; 
                $value = '<UNDEF>';
            }

            $new_line =~ s/$token/$value/g;

        }

        return $new_line;
    };
}

# Process a data file and print a set of formatted data.
sub Print_Formatted_Data {
    my $format    = shift; # Formatter function
    my $data_file = shift; # Path to data file.

    open( my $data_fh, '<', $data_file )
        or die "Unable to open data file '$data_file' - $!\n";

    while ( my $raw_data = <$data_fh> ) { 
        my @data_set  = split /\s+/, $raw_data;

        eval { 
            my $formatted = $format->(@data_set);

            print $formatted;
            1;
        }
        or do {
            warn "Error processing line $. of '$data_file' - $@";
        }

    }
}
share|improve this answer

Even though I'm not sure this is what you want (see comment). This is a way to get that output:

vinko@parrot:~$ more file1.txt
ABC 123
DEF 456
GHI 111
vinko@parrot:~$ more file2.txt
stringaa ttt stringbb yyy
vinko@parrot:~$ more concat.pl
use strict;
use warnings;

open (F1,"<",file1.txt) or die $!;
open (F2,"<",file2.txt) or die $!;

while (<F2>) {
        my ($field1, $field2, $field3, $field4) = split /\s/;
        while (<F1>) {
                my ($innerfield1, $innerfield2) = split /\s/;
                print "$field1 $innerfield1 $field3 $innerfield2\n";
        }
}
close F1;
close F2;
vinko@parrot:~$ perl concat.pl
stringaa ABC stringbb 123
stringaa DEF stringbb 456
stringaa GHI stringbb 111
share|improve this answer
    
Please use 3 arg form of open perldoc.perl.org/open.html –  Brad Gilbert Jul 22 '09 at 21:33

Hopefully this will work for you.

#! /usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;
use autodie;

my($in_file,$filter,$out_file);

if( @ARGV == 0 ){
  die "Must have filter at least\n";
}elsif( @ARGV == 1 ){
  ($filter) = @ARGV;
}elsif( @ARGV >= 2 ){
  ($in_file,$filter) = @ARGV;
}else{
  ($in_file,$filter,$out_file) = @ARGV;
}


{
  # autodie checks open() for errors
  # so we don't have to
  my($IN,$OUT);
  if( defined $in_file ){
    open $IN,  '<', $in_file;
  }else{
    $IN = *STDIN{IO};
  }
  if( defined $out_file ){
    open $OUT, '>', $out_file;
  }else{
    $OUT = *STDOUT{IO};
  }

  ProcessFiles($IN,$OUT,$filter);

  close $OUT;
  close $IN;
}

sub ProcessFilter{
  my($filter,$str) = @_;

  my @elem = grep {$_} split ' ', $str;

  $filter =~ s/\$(?|(?:{(\d+)})|(\d+))/ $elem[$1-1] /eg;

  return $filter;
}
sub ProcessFiles{
  my($IN,$OUT,$filter) = @_;

  while( my $line = <$IN> ){
    chomp $line;
    next unless $line;
    $line = ProcessFilter($filter,$line);
    say {$OUT} $line;
  }
}

It is called in one of the following manners

perl program.pl <input-file> 'filter string' <output-file>
perl program.pl <input-file> 'filter string' # sends to STDOUT
perl program.pl 'filter string' # recieves from STDIN, sends to STDOUT

If called like this

program.pl FILE1 'stringaa ${1} stringbb $2'

it reads FILE1 and outputs:

stringaa ABC stringbb 123
stringaa DEF stringbb 456
stringaa GHI stringbb 111
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