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This is a pretty strange issue so bear with me. I have a stored proc that does some heavy duty processing. When it runs well it usually takes a few minutes depending on server load, but occasionally it appears to get stuck.

I have looked at the results of sp_who2 and what I see is that the process is not blocked, it's still listed as 'RUNNABLE', but the value in disk IO stays the same. Once the process gets in this state it never finishes. If I kill the process and re-execute the stored proc, I usually get the same result.

Sometimes re-executing the stored proc works, but increasingly I end up having to restart SQL Server. Not ideal... After restart the stored proc executes as expected. Has anyone even hit a problem like this? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Some more context. The stored proc I am executing looks something like this:

delete
from table1

insert into table1
select columns
from 
(
    select columns
    from giant_table_1 WITH (NOLOCK)
    where condition
    group by columns

    UNION

    select columns
    from giant_table_2 WITH (NOLOCK)
    where condition
    group by columns
)
where condition

more crud on table1
.
.
.

If I insert some logging statements into the stored proc I can see that when it hangs it hangs on the insert/select. Wondering if this could be a weird consequence of the NOLOCK statement. We (and by we I mean my boss :)) added the nolock because giant_table_1 and giant_table_2 are constantly being changed. Without the nolock our sproc was getting blocked a lot by other long running processes and vice versa.

Thanks in advance!

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closed as off topic by casperOne Dec 25 '11 at 19:38

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1  
This should be moved to dba.stackexchange.com –  BryceAtNetwork23 Dec 23 '11 at 15:46
    
If you run this without the delete first what happens? –  u07ch Dec 23 '11 at 15:54
    
re-posted question here: dba.stackexchange.com/questions/9669/… –  Ben Tidman Dec 23 '11 at 16:29
    
Closed as cross-site dupe: dba.stackexchange.com/questions/9669/… –  casperOne Dec 25 '11 at 19:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Union can be a real hog. To test it you could do the individual inserts and see if the Union is significantly longer than the sum of the individual inserts.

If union is the hog I would try to refactor without the union but that last where condition may not allow you to break it down. Pretend you can move the last where into the into the individual wheres.

insert into table1 with (holdlock) 
select columns
from giant_table_1 WITH (NOLOCK)
where conditionPlus
group by columns
order by giant_table_1.PKoftable1;

insert into table1 with (holdlock) 
select columns
from giant_table_2 WITH (NOLOCK)
where conditionPlus 
and conditionToEliminateInsertsAlreadyInTable1
group by columns
order by giant_table_2.PKoftable1;

Notice the order by PK of table1. This can be huge. It is way faster to sort the insert than perform page splits. Tune the fill factor on Table1.

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And just what was wrong with that answer? –  Blam Dec 23 '11 at 20:13
    
not sure who voted you down. I ended up refactoring in the way you suggested over a month ago and haven't seen the problem again since. I wish there was something a little more concrete that I could point to as "this is what was breaking" but I am happy that it's working at this point. Thanks for your help. –  Ben Tidman Feb 28 '12 at 22:50
    
Two things. Union is a hog. Inserting by PK order reduces pages splits. You should check your indexes using showcontig rebuild if indicted. The TSQL has a lot of people that down vote what they don't understand. –  Blam Feb 29 '12 at 0:25

There can be a lot of things causing this -> check whether the log is not full, whether the DB file is not growing, whether the temp db is not full, whether there is a backup running or other back - end task. You can have lot of processes running - so the degree of parallelism can be the cause. There can be memory pressure on the sql/windows site(try to check the sql buffers or wait stats). The disk queue can be full . There can be something wrong in the OS...

I can continue on and on ... So it is hard to help you by seeing only your question.

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Thanks for the response. I had our DBA look into your suggestions and he is convinced he has eliminated them as possible problem, but maybe he is dumb. :) –  Ben Tidman Dec 23 '11 at 16:24
    
before we got our DB growth planning under control, auto-growth (of very-large databases) was the most common cause of "unexplained hanging"; the DB grow operation will block a connection/spid, that spid will block some others (or many others, depending on what it's doing), and it will look like it's just not doing anything at all. Horrible situation. –  Tao Dec 23 '11 at 17:31

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