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I'm trying to make simplest so library.

#include <stdio.h>
   void PutLoLoLo(){
   puts("Lololo");
}

compiling with g++:

g++ -shared -fPIC main2.cpp -o simple.so -Wall

and I get this in symbol table:

:$ nm -D --dynamic --defined-only simple.so 
0000048c T _Z9PutLoLoLov
00002010 A __bss_start
00002010 A _edata
00002018 A _end
000004f8 T _fini
00000354 T _init

but I expect something like this:

0000048c T PutLoLoLo
00002010 A __bss_start
00002010 A _edata
00002018 A _end
000004f8 T _fini
00000354 T _init

So, of course, I get dlopen() error when I try to load it.

Please, help me: what am I doing wrong?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

C++ mangles symbol names. If you want to avoid the mangling, the function must be declared as extern C, like so:

#include <stdio.h>
   extern "C" void PutLoLoLo(){
   puts("Lololo");
}

Then the link:

$ g++ -shared -fPIC lolo.cc -o lolo.so -Wall

Will give you what you expect:

$ nm -D --dynamic --defined-only ./lolo.so 
000000000000061c T PutLoLoLo
0000000000002018 A __bss_start
0000000000002018 A _edata
0000000000002028 A _end
0000000000000668 T _fini
0000000000000500 T _init

You will be able to dlopen the library and obtain the symbol via its 'normal' name. The function is restricted to having C semantics. So you can't, for instance, do this with member functions, or use objects with class semantics as arguments, etc. So if you need to pass in objects, you will need to take those arguments as void *, and cast.

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Thanks! That helped! Don't you know, is there a way to load mangled symbols somehow by name without using "extern C"? It is enough for my library, but I'm just curious. –  Chelovek Chelovechnii Dec 23 '11 at 19:09
    
As far as I know, there is no portable way to determine the mangled name of a symbol. Every toolchain is free to mangle as it sees fit; this is sort of the point. The way to typically work around this issue with dynamically loaded C++ is to have one 'extern C' entry point, which is required to return a pointer to an object that implements an abstract interface (vtable) that both the loading and loaded code share. The loader can then reinterpret_cast to that interface type, and now you have access to the C++ features of the lib. But this stuff is hard to get right! –  acm Dec 23 '11 at 19:19

That looks like C++ name mangling. Try this:

extern "C" void PutLoLoLo(){
   puts("Lololo");
}
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