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Currently my program generates random 8 character strings made from numbers.

See below

public static string GenerateNewCode()
    {
        string newCode = String.Empty;
        int seed = unchecked(DateTime.Now.Ticks.GetHashCode());
        Random random = new Random(seed);

        // keep going until we find a unique code       
        do
        {
            newCode = random.Next(0, 9999).ToString("0000")
                    + random.Next(0, 9999).ToString("0000");
        }
        while (!ConsumerCode.isUnique(newCode));

        // return
        return newCode;
    }

However, I want to be able to create random codes of 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 numbers.

Not sure the most efficient way of doing this.

My idea was to create a random number between 0 - 9 and then do this X amount of times based on the length of code required.

There must be an easy/more efficient way to doing this .....

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You should cache the Random instance in a field somewhere and create it only once. Creating and discarding Random instances in a method is very rarely the correct thing to do. And your seed isn't actually better than the one Random uses internally. –  Јοеу Dec 23 '11 at 17:28
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
internal class Program {
    private static void Main(string[] args) {
        Console.WriteLine(GetNumber(7));
        Console.WriteLine(GetNumber(8));
        Console.WriteLine(GetNumber(12));
        Console.WriteLine(GetNumber(500));
    }

    public static string GetNumber(int length) {
        return string.Concat(RandomDigits().Take(length));
    }

    public static IEnumerable<int> RandomDigits() {
        var rng = new Random(System.Environment.TickCount);
        while (true) yield return rng.Next(10);
    }
}

or

internal class Program {
    private static void Main(string[] args) {
        Console.WriteLine(GetNumber(12));
    }

    public static string GetNumber(int length) {
        var rng = new Random(Environment.TickCount);
        return string.Concat(Enumerable.Range(0, length).Select((index) => rng.Next(10).ToString()));
    }
}

Easy? yes. Most efficient? maybe not.

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Unless this is time critical I would just generate a 12-digit random number every time and just use the 8-12 digits I need. You're testing and retrying for uniqueness, so that should still work.

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It's pretty time critical to be honest with you. –  swade1987 Dec 23 '11 at 17:25
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 var r = new Random();
 z = 12
 Enumerable.Range(1,z).Select(x => r.Next(10).ToString()).Aggregate((x,y) => x + y)

maybe not that efficient but looks cool :D

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If you want to length of the code be predefind use:

public static string GenerateNewCode(int length)
    {
        string newCode = String.Empty;
        int seed = unchecked(DateTime.Now.Ticks.GetHashCode());
        Random random = new Random(seed);

        // keep going until we find a unique code       
        do
        {
            newCode = random.Next(Math.Pow(10,length-1), Math.Pow(10,length)-1).ToString("0000")
        }
        while (!ConsumerCode.isUnique(newCode));

        // return
        return newCode;
    }

if you want the length to be random use this:

public static string GenerateNewCode()
    {
        string newCode = String.Empty;
        int seed = unchecked(DateTime.Now.Ticks.GetHashCode());
        Random random = new Random(seed);
        int length = random.Next(9,12);
        // keep going until we find a unique code       
        do
        {
            newCode = random.Next(Math.Pow(10,length-1), Math.Pow(10,length)-1).ToString("0000")
        }
        while (!ConsumerCode.isUnique(newCode));

        // return
        return newCode;
    }
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Hi, I used your first code, however when I pass in a length of 10 it generates the first code of length 10 but then the next 'X' times round it only provides codes of 9 characters. Any ideas? –  swade1987 Jan 4 '12 at 16:01
    
Their is a problem with the first GenerateNewCode method, when the codeLength is 10 or greater it errors because 10 to the power of 9 is greater than int32.MaxValue –  swade1987 Jan 4 '12 at 16:28
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I would do it like this:

List<int> li = new List<int>();
for(int i = 0; i<=9999; i++) 
{
li.Add(i);
}
List<int> liRandom = new List<int>();
for(int i = 0; i<= 9999; i++) //replace 9999 with a number you need to gen
{
int randomIndex = rand.Next(0,li.Length);
liRandom.Add(li[randomIndex]);
li.Remove(li[randomIndex]);
}// liRandom now contains needed numbers

Hope you got the idea :)

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Hi Elastep, so if my function passed in GenerateNewCode(9) would this return a code of 9 numbers? –  swade1987 Dec 23 '11 at 17:24
    
if you'll replace second 9999 with the number you need it will return needed amount of unique numbers –  Elastep Dec 23 '11 at 17:32
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and this one might actually be efficient

    public static string GetNumber(int length) {
        var rng = new Random(Environment.TickCount);
        var number = rng.NextDouble().ToString("0.000000000000").Substring(2, length);
        return number;
    }

works up to 12 characters, may work up to 16.

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