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The Java docs state that if we supplied a Runnable target when creating a new thread, .start() of that thread would run the run() method of the supplied runnable.

If that's the case, shouldn't this test code prints "a" (instead of printing "b") ?

public class test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Runnable r = new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                System.out.println("a");
            }
        };
        Thread t = new Thread(r) {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                System.out.println("b");
            }
        };
        t.start();
    }
}
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8 Answers 8

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Because you are overriding Thread.run() method.

Here is the implementation of Thread.run():

@Override
public void run() {
    if (target != null) {
        target.run();
    }
}

try:

}) {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        super.run(); // ADD THIS LINE
        System.out.println("b");
    }
}.start();

You will get ab.

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1  
Isn't this a phrasing error with the documentation then? Because the Java docs docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/… state that if we supplied a Runnable target when creating a new thread, .start() of that thread would run the run() method of the supplied runnable (regardless of whether or not we have overridden the Thread's run() method). Which is what I did, but the behavior is not as they have "defined". –  Pacerier Dec 23 '11 at 17:56
    
Well strictly speaking the doc is clear, as that's what Thread.run() method provide and not any possible overridden functionality. –  user802421 Dec 23 '11 at 17:59
1  
It's like any other methods. You can override and break the contract if the method is not declared final. –  user802421 Dec 23 '11 at 18:05
2  
You are right. Consider though that the "unless" part apply to every methods in Java that is not final. –  user802421 Dec 23 '11 at 18:17
4  
@Pacerier Technically, you are not calling Thread.start(), you are calling Thread$1.start() (or however Java names the anonymous classes). So the docs are correct. Now, perhaps one could argue that Thread.run() should be final. –  user949300 Dec 23 '11 at 18:26

The default implementation is to call the Runnable. However you are overriding the default implementation and NOT calling the runnable. The simplest way to fix this is

    new Thread(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            System.out.println("a");
        }
    }) {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            super.run(); // call the default implementation.
            System.out.println("b");
        }
    }.start();
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docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/… states "target - the object whose run method is invoked when this thread is started." so don't you think that the documentation is sloppily phrased? –  Pacerier Dec 23 '11 at 18:04
    
The documentation is correct. You have overridden the class with a sub-class which behave differently. You haven't changed the way Thread behaves. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 23 '11 at 18:12
3  
@Pacerier - that's like breaking a drinking glass and then complaining to the manufacturer that it doesn't hold water anymore. –  Perception Dec 23 '11 at 18:17
4  
@Perception Its more like creating a new drinking glass with a hole in the bottom and then complaining the manufacturer of the glass you based it on that your glass doesn't hold water. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Dec 23 '11 at 18:44

The default implementation of Thread.run() does what the javadocs say (look at the source code)

public void run() {
    if (target != null) {
        target.run();
    }
}

However, Thread.run() is public, and you overrode it, so it calls your println("b"), and totally ignores the Runnable passed in the constructor. Arguably, Thread.run() should be final, but it isn't.

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You have overridden the default implementation of Thread.run() in what I guess is an anonymous subclass, hence what the JavaDoc says no longer applies.

If you try

public class Test {
public static void main(String[] args) {

    new Thread(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            System.out.println("a");
        }
    }) .start();
}
}

You get the answer you expect, a.

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But shouldn't what the JavaDoc says applies regardless of whether or not I have overridden anything if at all ? (since the documentation didn't state clearly that "the default implementation is this and this which if you override will etc etc" –  Pacerier Dec 23 '11 at 18:01
1  
It's implied, that's what overriding a method does, it replaces the overridden method with your new implementation. Done correctly it is a powerful way of allowing classes to add new behaviour, such as when you extend the Thread class (which is an alternative to using Runnables). What did you expect to happen and what did you think overriding did? –  chrisbunney Dec 23 '11 at 19:13

The first block overrides run in Runnable. The second block overrides run in Thread. When you call start on a Thread, its run method is invoked. The default run method in Thread calls the Runnable.run method but since you overrode Thread.run there is no code to start the Runnable - only your code to print 'b'.

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The documentation that I have says this: "Causes this thread to begin execution; the Java Virtual Machine calls the run method of this thread." which means that it should print b instead of a, since you have overridden the run() method of Thread.

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You are calling start() method. Reading the docs in the link you provided it states:

public void start() Causes this thread to begin execution; the Java Virtual Machine calls the run method of this thread.

You should call the run() method if you would like to call the Runnable object's run method.

public void run() If this thread was constructed using a separate Runnable run object, then that Runnable object's run method is called; otherwise, this method does nothing and returns.

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You are actually extending the Thread class and calling start on the instance of that anonymous subclass.

I think the confusion is that the "Java Doc" is for the java.lang.Thread class not for your class that extends that class.

e.g.

Runnable r = new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("a");
    }
};
Thread t = new Thread(r);

Now, if it does not call that run then java doc is wrong. Which is not true.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes that's what I'm doing. –  Pacerier Dec 23 '11 at 17:58
    
@Pacerier: See update. –  Bhesh Gurung Dec 23 '11 at 18:25

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