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This code does not compile:

public T Get<T>()
{
    T result = default(T);
    if(typeof(T) == typeof(int))
    {    
        int i = 0;
        result = (T)i;
    }

    return result;
}

however, this code does compile:

public T Get<T>()
{
    T result = default(T);
    if(typeof(T) == typeof(int))
    {    
        int i = 0;
        result = (T)(object)i;
    }

    return result;
}

The code also works fine. I don't understand why the compiler can cast an object (actual type could be anything) to T, but cannot cast an int (which inherets from object) to T.

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Can you see the difference where int i is type of int and (T)(Object)i you may want to look at what is boxing and unboxing implicit casting vs explicit casting that what this looks like –  MethodMan Dec 23 '11 at 19:39
    
possible duplicate of Generics: casting and value types, why is this illegal? –  Ben Voigt Dec 23 '11 at 19:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As SLaks, says the compiler knows that that T is convertible to object but that's only half of it. The compiler also know that any object of type T derives from object, so it needs to allow downcasts from object to T. Collections pre v2.0 needed this. Not to T of course but to be able to downcast from object to any type. It would have been impossible to get anything out of a collection as anything else than an object.

The same is not true when talking about T and int. You code is of course safe from those problems at runtime due to the if statement but the compiler can't see that. In general (not in this case though) proving that you will never get to the body of an if in the case of some external condition being true is NP-complete and since we wish the compile to complete at some point, it's not going to try and basically solve a millenium prize problem

There are many scenarios where substituting a specific type for T would not be allowed in non generic code. If you can't write the code as non generic for any substitution of T with a specific type, it's not valid, not just in this case but generally. If you know that for all your use cases of the method it would actually be valid, you can use constraints to your generic method

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The compiler doesn't know that T is int. (even though you just proved that it is int in your if)

By contrast, the compiler does know that T is always convertible to object.

For example, if T is string, it's still convertible to object, but it's not convertible to int.

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So how does it know object is convertible to int? –  Matthijs Wessels Dec 23 '11 at 21:00
    
@MatthijsWessels: It isn't, not necessarily. But the compiler knows how to do it: perform an unboxing conversion on the object, and if the result is an int, return that, or else throw an exception. For comparison, int x = 1; long y = (long) ((object) x); will throw for the same reason. long y = (long) x; only works because (and this is the key point) casting a value type means a conversion takes place, while casting a reference type does not perform any conversion (at worst, it only performs an unboxing operation). –  Daniel Pryden Dec 23 '11 at 21:14
    
I don't see why it can't say:"hmm, I don't know enough about T to do any specific type conversion. I do know it's an object though, so I'll do conversion as if its an object." –  Matthijs Wessels Dec 23 '11 at 21:35
    
@matthijs The compiler need to be able to determine whether (T)x means convert x to T (E.g if x is int and T is long) unbox Eg. if x is object and T is int, cast E.g. if compile time type of x is object and T is string or call a custom conversion operator (which equals calling a method). Since all for are possible in a generic method, the compiler can't choose one over the other three –  Rune FS Dec 25 '11 at 19:38
1  
@MatthijsWessels: (long)(object)x will throw. blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/03/19/… –  SLaks Dec 25 '11 at 23:45

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