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I am having trouble with enums in C#

I have an enum here:

namespace Project.Shared
{
    public enum CostType
    {
        Dollars,
        Percent
    }
}

I have an object that is trying to use the enum here:

using Project.Shared;
namespace Project.Shared.FooNamespace
{
    public class Foo
    {
        public int CostType { get; set; }

        public Foo()
        {

            CostType = (int)CostType.Dollars; // <--- error syntax highlighting on 'Dollars'
        }
    }
}

This results in an error:

'int' does not contain a definition for 'Dollars' and no extension method 'Dollars' accepting a first argument of type 'int' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?)

I do not understand why I can't use my enum there. Can someone help explain it to me?

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6  
This may be a hint that you shouldn't use the same name for the enum as for the property. –  John Saunders Dec 23 '11 at 20:17
1  
Why do you want to store the value as an int if you've got the enum and you want the enum value? –  WestDiscGolf Dec 23 '11 at 20:18
2  
@JohnSaunders As far as I know, this behavior isn't generally considered bad style. It's also a common pattern in the BCL. –  CodesInChaos Dec 23 '11 at 20:23
1  
@CodeInChaos: 10,000 wrongs don't make a right. –  John Saunders Dec 23 '11 at 20:27
3  
@CodeInChaos: OK, so how would you disambiguate a namespace and a type that have the same name? –  Eric Lippert Dec 24 '11 at 0:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Because your class Foo has this definition - public int CostType { get; set; } - which has more local scope than your enum.

Try fully qualifying it with its namespace:

CostType = (int)Project.Shared.CostType.Dollars;
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1  
Additionally, I would do this.CostType = to help with the ambiguity of CostType. –  Erik Philips Dec 23 '11 at 20:20
    
@ErikPhilips +1 I'm with ya. Lots of folks seem to despise seeing the this qualifier in code though... –  Yuck Dec 23 '11 at 20:21
1  
Thanks for the help... this solved it. Merry Christmas –  quakkels Dec 23 '11 at 20:23
    
Whats about int.parse(CostType.toString("d")) compared to (int)CostType; ? –  Grrbrr404 Dec 23 '11 at 20:28

As others have pointed out, the property is "closer" than the type, and so when the simple name is resolved, the property always wins.

An interesting wrinkle on this situation though is that if you had made the property of type CostType rather than int, it would have worked.

The reason for that is because C# has a special rule just for that situation, usually called the "Color Color" rule. (Because that is the situation in which it most commonly arises: a type named Color and a property called Color of type Color.)

If a simple name could mean both a type and a property or field with that name, of that type, then C# allows you to both access static members via the type and instance members via the property. This allows you to do things like:

Color = Color.Red;
description = Color.ToString();

The first and third Colors are references to the property; the second is a reference to the type.

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1  
+1 for something new learned today –  Mark Peters Dec 23 '11 at 20:59
    
+1 Very interesting, didn't know that either. –  Yuck Dec 23 '11 at 22:18

You have naming conflict. You named you property CostType which is the same as enum name. This way C# is assuming that both CostType references in Foo() method are referencing the property and not enum.

You could try this:

CostType = (int)Project.Shared.CostType.Dollars;
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Change it to this and it should work

public enum CostType
{ 
    Dollars,
    Percent 
} 

public class Foo
{         
    public int CostTypes { get; set; }
    public Foo()
    { 
        CostTypes = (int)CostType.Dollars;
        // <--- error syntax highlighting on 'Dollars'
    }
} 

I would not name my auto property the same name as my enum CostType I tested this and what I have posted did compile and work

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3  
naming this property CostTypes makes no sense. It's not a flags enum, and thus can only represent a single CostType. So why are you using the plural? –  CodesInChaos Dec 23 '11 at 20:24
    
I looked as his question as having an access issue or compile issue if that's the case then he should have namespaces either fully qualified of have them match –  MethodMan Dec 23 '11 at 20:26
    
@DJ KRAZE - Per Yuck's answer I am now fully qualifying the names –  quakkels Dec 23 '11 at 20:29
    
I see that.. but based on your initial error I took that to be a naming issue.. my mistake.. that's why I pluralized my example sorry –  MethodMan Dec 23 '11 at 20:31
    
+1 because your answer does solve my issue... I would just rather not have the plural naming. –  quakkels Dec 23 '11 at 20:33

The problem is that in CostType = (int)CostType.Dollars; Both occurances of CostType refer to the variable. And the variable CostType has no property called Dollars. Include the namespace to refer to the type Project.Shared.CostType to explicitly refer to the type, not the variable.

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