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I'm trying to read the registry key "RPSessionInterval" from the subkey "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\SystemRestore" in C#. I'm using the following code and getting the exception "Object reference not set to an instance of an object."

string systemRestore = @"SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\SystemRestore";
RegistryKey baseRegistryKey = Registry.LocalMachine;
public string SystemRestoreStatus(string subKey, string keyName)
{
    RegistryKey rkSubKey = baseRegistryKey.OpenSubKey(systemRestore);
    if (rkSubKey != null)
    {
        try
        {
            string sysRestore = rkSubKey.GetValue("RPSessionInterval").ToString();
            if (string.Compare(sysRestore, "1") == 0)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("System Restore is Enabled!");
                return "System Restore is Enabled!";
            }
            else if (string.Compare(sysRestore, "0") == 0)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("System Restore is Disabled!");
                return "System Restore is Disabled!";
            }
            else
            {
                return null;
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)   //This exception is thrown
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Error while reading registry key: " + subKey + "\\" + keyName + ". ErrorMessage: " + ex.Message, "Error", MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Error);
            return null;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        MessageBox.Show("Error while reading registry key: " + subKey + "\\" + keyName + " does not exist!", "Error", MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Error);
        return null;
    }
}

Here is a picture showing that the registry key actually exists:

Image

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Are you sure keyName = "RPSessionInterval"? –  M.Babcock Dec 23 '11 at 20:44
    
Oops, yes, forgot to add that in the code. Just edited my code to reflect those changes. Same error, still. –  12hys Dec 23 '11 at 20:47
    
Are you sure your application has the required permissions to read the key you are trying to access? - EDIT: A different error would be raised if it wasn't so nevermind. –  M.Babcock Dec 23 '11 at 20:49
    
Yes, I run it as admin. What's weird is that I'm following the same process for another registry key, and the other one works. This one seems to not find this key, when it's clearly in the registry. –  12hys Dec 23 '11 at 20:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You probably have the wrong bitness for your C# application. By default, a Visual Studio 2010 C# project will compile to x86 (32-bit). A 32-bit application running on a 64-bit OS can generally only access the 32-bit registry, the contents of which are often different than the native 64-bit registry. Change the architecture to "Any CPU" or "x64" and it may work.

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1  
This is the correct answer why the exception is thrown. –  Tomislav Markovski Dec 23 '11 at 21:21
    
Yes, setting the project to "Any CPU" seems to fix it. I'm on a 64-bit OS, will anyone using 32-bit Windows be able to use this app, or would I need to recompile for separate 32-bit and 64-bit versions? –  12hys Dec 24 '11 at 0:51
    
Any CPU is the right choice for apps that need to run "native" on both 32-bit and 64-bit platforms. It ensures that you don't need to recompile. It will work fine unless you have native DLL dependencies (and if that is the case, you'll have to ensure there are both x86 and x64 versions of the native DLLs you need). –  bobbymcr Dec 24 '11 at 0:59

You most likely have a spelling issue for the call to SystemRestoreStatus, which is causing the exception on the following line:

string sysRestore = rkSubKey.GetValue(keyName).ToString();

If you aren't sure whether the value will exist or not, you can change this line to:

string sysRestore = rkSubKey.GetValue(keyName) as string;

and then test to see if the string is null or empty before trying to use it.

Update

Another possibility is that you are executing the code from a 32-bit application on a 64-bit OS. In this case, .Net helpfully redirects your request to the

SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\...

node instead.

You can get around this issue by using RegistryKey.OpenBaseKey using RegistryView.Registry64 as the second parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, forgot to add that in the code. Just edited my code to reflect those changes. Same error, still. –  12hys Dec 23 '11 at 20:47
    
@12hys: I just added some additional info the answer that could also be causing you problems. –  competent_tech Dec 23 '11 at 21:04

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