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I have a stack of elements from which a random element has to be removed (i.e. all the elements which are between the top and that particular element will be popped and pushed again). And every time an element is popped, we have to determine how many times it has been popped earlier for other elements.

I have been on this since a long while. (The stack is dynamic (i.e. elements are being added and removed from time to time)).

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would store the stack as a singly linked list, and keep an integer in each node to represent the number of times it's been accessed. IE, a stack with 5 on top, 7 on the bottom and no accesses made would look like:

| 5 | -> | 2 | -> | 3 | -> | 1 | -> | 7 |
| 0 | -> | 0 | -> | 0 | -> | 0 | -> | 0 |

Then you could write your own pop (O(n)) which just iterates through the linked list adding 1 to access count for each node it visits (if you can assume that what you pop is always in the stack, then you only need to iterate through it once, if not you may need to iterate through twice) such that pop(3): // Returns 0

| 5 | -> | 2 | -> | 1 | -> | 7 |
| 1 | -> | 1 | -> | 0 | -> | 0 |

pop(7): // Returns 0

| 5 | -> | 2 | -> | 1 |
| 2 | -> | 2 | -> | 1 |

pop(2): // Returns 2

| 5 | -> | 1 |
| 3 | -> | 1 |

push(6):

| 6 | -> | 5 | -> | 1 |
| 0 | -> | 3 | -> | 1 |

pop(1): // Returns 1

| 6 | -> | 5 |
| 1 | -> | 4 |

pop(6): // Returns 1

| 5 |
| 4 |

pop(5): // Returns 4

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this is very helpful,but the problem is that this question is asked in my book when stack is being implemented as structures using array. –  Karanv.10111 Dec 23 '11 at 21:26

If I'm understanding you right, you have your own stack structure and you want to count the pushes and pops of specific elements. If that's the case, you could wrap your data in a struct and have the stack store a list (whatever the internal implementation of the stack is) of this struct:

struct stack_data {
   unsigned push_count;
   unsigned pop_count;
   void *data; /* or whatever type the data is */
};

...

void stack_push(/* stack argument */, struct stack_data *data)
{
   ...
   data->push_count++;
}

void stack_pop(/* stack argument */, struct stack_data *data)
{
   ...
   data->pop_count++;
}
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You won't need both of these if you know the number of items on the stack :) –  Pedery Dec 23 '11 at 21:26
    
@Pedery but the number keeps on changing.i was thinking that if i could store initial position of that particular element and then when it will be popped i could subtract it from the final position.but i can't seem to go about it.and if you understood the concept of this code ,please explain. –  Karanv.10111 Dec 23 '11 at 21:30
    
My point was simply that you wont need both pop_count and push_count. Only one of them is needed. Pops, pushes and the stack size are all connected. If pop_count is 50 and the stack size is 10, then obviously the push count must be 60. Since your intention is to keep different items on the stack, you'd need to know the number of that item that the stack contains, so the concept is essentially the same. –  Pedery Dec 23 '11 at 21:36
    
@Pedery: I'm not sure we're thinking about the same thing. I'm assuming the OP just wants to know how many times a certain element has been pushed and popped off a stack, nothing to do with the position. You don't really need the pop_count because it'll be the same as the push_count or 1 less if it's still in the stack. I think you and PaulPRO have interpreted the question different to me. –  AusCBloke Dec 23 '11 at 21:49
    
Never mind. It's been marked as solved and I was simply making a note. Nothing more. –  Pedery Dec 26 '11 at 11:30

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