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I am developing the following class:

class Handle
{
public:
    inline Handle()
    {
        handle = INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;
    }
    inline Handle(HANDLE handle)
    {
        this->handle = copyHandle(handle);
    }
    inline Handle(const Handle& rhs)
    {
        this->handle = copyHandle(rhs.handle);
    }
    inline bool isValid()
    {
        return handle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;
    }
    inline HANDLE getNativeHandle()
    {
        return copyHandle(this->handle);
    }
    inline void close()
    {
        if(handle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        {
            CloseHandle(handle);
            handle = INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;
        }

    }
    inline virtual ~Handle()
    {
        if(handle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
            CloseHandle(handle);
    }
protected:
    HANDLE handle;
    HANDLE copyHandle(HANDLE copyable);
};

The .cpp file:

HANDLE Handle::copyHandle(HANDLE copyable)
{
    HANDLE ret;
    HANDLE current = GetCurrentProcess();
    if(copyable == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        ret = copyable;

    else if(DuplicateHandle(current, copyable, current, &ret, 0, TRUE , DUPLICATE_SAME_ACCESS) == 0)
        {
            if(GetLastError() == ERROR_ACCESS_DENIED)
                throw SecurityException("The handle duplication was denied!");
            else
                throw InvalidHandleException("The handle could not be duplicated!");
        }

    return ret;
}

The class seems to work fine normally, but copying the handle, then closing the original handle and then copying the new handle will throw an exception or Windows Errorcode 6 which is "Invalid Handle Value".

At the moment, I think that closing the original handle leads to complete destruction of the copies too and makes me unable to use them afterwards.

Handle test = CreateMutex(NULL, FALSE, NULL);
Handle copy = test;
test.close();
std::cout << copy.getNativeHandle() << std::endl; // throws an exception, but uses the same function as above
return 0;

Is there a possibility to duplicate the handle so it is not dependent on the existence of the original one?

share|improve this question
    
Aside: inline is implied on member functions defined inside a class body. You don't need to state it explictly, most programmers don't. –  Charles Bailey Dec 23 '11 at 21:05
    
Ok, I changed that, thanks for the help! –  jgpt Dec 23 '11 at 21:07
1  
Two comments: you don't define a copy assignment operator so it is possible to copy your class without duplicating the contained handle, also, do you mean to copy the handle on getNativeHandle? This means that all clients of your class need to manually close the returned handle every time they retrieve it. It doesn't leave your class making life much easier for the client. –  Charles Bailey Dec 23 '11 at 21:10
1  
Your test code is broken, test.close() doesn't compile. Couldn't get a repro when I fixed it. Copying the handle in the constructors is a questionable practice, apt to cause leaks. Be sure to assert the return value of CloseHandle(). –  Hans Passant Dec 23 '11 at 21:15
1  
@jgpt: You have not defined a copy assignment operator so the compiler will generate one for you that just does a straight assignment of handle. –  Charles Bailey Dec 23 '11 at 21:28

2 Answers 2

Try this implementation:

class Handle
{
public:
    Handle(HANDLE ahandle = INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
    {
        handle = ahandle; // <- take ownership of the original, not a copy
    }

    Handle(const Handle& src)     
    {
        handle = src.duplicate(); // <-- take ownership of a copy
    }

    ~Handle()
    {
        close();
    }

    void close()
    {
        if (handle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        {
            CloseHandle(handle);
            handle = INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;
        }
    }

    HANDLE getNativeHandle() const
    {
        return handle;
    }

    bool isValid() const
    {
        return (handle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE);
    }

    HANDLE duplicate()
    {
        if (handle == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
            return handle;

        HANDLE ret, current = GetCurrentProcess();
        if (!DuplicateHandle(current, handle, current, &ret, 0, TRUE, DUPLICATE_SAME_ACCESS))
        {
            if (GetLastError() == ERROR_ACCESS_DENIED)
                throw SecurityException("The handle duplication was denied!");
            else
                throw InvalidHandleException("The handle could not be duplicated!");
        }

        return ret;
    }

    Handle& operator=(HANDLE &rhs)
    {
        close();
        handle = rhs; // <-- take ownership of the original, not a copy
        return *this;
    }

    Handle& operator=(const Handle &rhs)
    {
        close();
        handle = rhs.duplicate(); // <-- take ownership of a copy
        return *this;
    }

protected:
    HANDLE handle;
};

On a side note, some API functions use NULL instead of INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE, and some do not use CloseHandle(). You should consider accounting for those differences. I would suggest updating the Handle class to use C++ templates so you can specialize the behavior on a per-instance basis, eg:

struct InvalidHandleTrait
{
    static const HANDLE InvalidValue = INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;
};

struct NullHandleTrait
{
    static const HANDLE InvalidValue = NULL;
};

struct CloseHandleTrait
{
    static bool close(HANDLE handle)
    {
        return CloseHandle(handle);
    }
};

template< typename HandleTrait = InvalidHandleTrait, typename CloseTrait = CloseHandleTrait >
class Handle
{
public:
    Handle(HANDLE ahandle = HandleTrait::InvalidValue)
    {
        handle = ahandle; // <- take ownership of the original, not a copy
    }

    Handle(const Handle& src)     
    {
        handle = src.duplicate(); // <-- take ownership of a copy
    }

    ~Handle()
    {
        close();
    }

    void close()
    {
        if (handle != HandleTrait::InvalidValue)
        {
            CloseTrait::close(handle);
            handle = HandleTrait::InvalidValue;
        }
    }

    HANDLE getNativeHandle() const
    {
        return handle;
    }

    bool isValid() const
    {
        return (handle != HandleTrait::InvalidValue);
    }

    HANDLE duplicate()
    {
        if (handle == HandleTrait::InvalidValue)
            return handle;

        HANDLE ret, current = GetCurrentProcess();
        if (!DuplicateHandle(current, handle, current, &ret, 0, TRUE, DUPLICATE_SAME_ACCESS))
        {
            if (GetLastError() == ERROR_ACCESS_DENIED)
                throw SecurityException("The handle duplication was denied!");
            else
                throw InvalidHandleException("The handle could not be duplicated!");
        }

        return ret;
    }

    Handle& operator=(HANDLE &rhs)
    {
        close();
        handle = rhs; // <-- take ownership of the original, not a copy
        return *this;
    }

    Handle& operator=(const Handle &rhs)
    {
        close();
        handle = rhs.duplicate(); // <-- take ownership of a copy
        return *this;
    }

protected:
    HANDLE handle;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a way to differentiate between a Handle from GetCurrentProcess and a standard invalid handle? –  jgpt Dec 23 '11 at 22:40
    
Do you mean DuplicateHandle() instead of GetCurrentProcess()? GetCurrentProcess() returns a pseudo handle. AFAIK, there is no way to query a handle to know if it was duplicated or not. Either way, both types of handles will not be set to INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE. –  Remy Lebeau Dec 24 '11 at 16:24

You also need to define an assignment operator for Handle. I suspect the code that actually crashed looked like this:

Handle test = CreateMutex(NULL, FALSE, NULL);
Handle copy;
copy= test; // assigned instead of using copy constructor
test.close();
std::cout << copy.getNativeHandle() << std::endl;
return 0;

Without an assignment operator, you do not duplicate the handle properly.

share|improve this answer
    
I have now added: ` Handle & operator= (const Handle& other) { this->close(); this->handle = copyHandle(other.handle); return *this; }` –  jgpt Dec 23 '11 at 21:40

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