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I am writing a Python program that creates a 9x9 matrix with all of the values being 0. Then I have to manually put in the a actual values I want to be in it. (That is why I have all of the inserts.) I am trying to use the list.remove(x) command with list being the matrix and x being the value I am trying to remove. I know that the x value I am putting in is in the matrix but I keep getting an error saying it isn't.

Here is my code:

matrix = [[0 for x in range (9)] for y in range (9)]
C = matrix.count([0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])
matrix.insert(0, [0, 0, 0, 5, 0, 0, 0, 0, 6])
matrix.insert(0, [8, 0, 0, 0, 4, 7, 5, 0, 3])
matrix.insert(0, [0, 5, 0, 0, 0, 3, 0, 0, 0])
matrix.insert(0, [0, 7, 0, 8, 0, 0, 0, 0, 9])
matrix.insert(0, [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0])
matrix.insert(0, [9, 0, 0, 0, 0, 4, 0, 2, 0])
matrix.insert(0, [0, 0, 0, 9, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0])
matrix.insert(0, [7, 0, 8, 3, 2, 0, 0, 0, 5])
matrix.insert(0, [3, 0, 0, 0, 0, 8, 0, 0, 0])
matrix.reverse()
for sublist in matrix:
    s = str(sublist)
    print (s)
print (C)
matrix.remove("[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]")

Here is the error I keep getting:

Traceback (most recent call last):
line 17, in <module>
matrix.remove("[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]")
ValueError: list.remove(x): x not in list

I also tried using this code but Python seems to just find that it isn't in the matrix anyways. This I put in place of matrix.remove("[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]") Here it is:

if "[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]" in matrix:
    matrix.remove("[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]")

I am very new to Python and am still learning. Any help you might give me would be greatly appreciated.

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For numerical operations with matrices consider using numpy. –  Bora Caglayan Dec 24 '11 at 0:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Change:

 matrix.remove("[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]")

to:

 matrix.remove([0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])

The list you're looking for isn't a string; it's a list; no need to put it through as a string.

share|improve this answer
    
Ohhhhhh. Thanks. Wow looking at the same thing for a while you begin to ignore the details! Is that syntax new in 3.0? –  cbbcbail Dec 23 '11 at 22:55
    
No; it's been a mainstay of the language since the beginning. list.remove(x) only looks for a specific type in the list, and if it finds it, and then if it matches on with x, it's removed. –  Makoto Dec 23 '11 at 22:56
    
Oh. I was just wondering because I was looking back at some old forums and they had it the way I used it which is why I did it that way. –  cbbcbail Dec 23 '11 at 22:58
    
It may have been the case that the example used a string instead. –  Makoto Dec 23 '11 at 23:01
    
That may very well be the case. –  cbbcbail Dec 23 '11 at 23:10

In Python, a string is not the same as a list. You want

matrix.remove([0, 0, ..., 0])

and not

matrix.remove("[0, 0, ..., 0]")

But simpler would be just to construct the matrix correctly in the first place.

matrix = [
    [0, 0, 0, 5, 0, 0, 0, 0, 6],
    [8, 0, 0, 0, 4, 7, 5, 0, 3],
    [0, 5, 0, 0, 0, 3, 0, 0, 0],
    ...]
share|improve this answer
    
List literals? I think they were always in Python. –  user97370 Dec 23 '11 at 22:50
    
OK thanks for the advice with correctly defining the matrix! That makes things much simpler. –  cbbcbail Dec 23 '11 at 22:56

Your matrix is a list of lists of integers. What you are trying to do is to remove a string value from the list.

matrix.remove("[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]")

"[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]" is a string. Try doing

matrix.remove([0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])

Note the absence of quotes around [0,...,0].

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