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I've been up and down stackoverflow and even the very, very nice Dr. Dobbs article but I can't find a definitive answer to the question.

A section of the answer to the question What are the shortcomings of std::reverse_iterator? says that it might not be possible at all.


std::list::reverse_iterator it = list.rbegin();

while(  it != list.rend() )
{
   int value=*it;
   if( some_cond_met_on(value) )
   {     
        ++it;
        list.erase( it.base() );
   }
   else
   {
     ++it;
   }
}

PS: I do know there are other alternatives, such as erase_if(), but I'm looking for an answer to this specific question.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It should just be

std::list<int>::reverse_iterator it = list.rbegin();

while(  it != list.rend() )
{
   int value=*it;
   if( some_cond_met_on(value) )
   {     
        ++it;
        it= reverse_iterator(list.erase(it.base()); // change to this!
   }
   else
   {
     ++it;
   }
}
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I'll give it a try. How did you figure this one out? (Just asking to learn how to learn) –  Migs Dec 23 '11 at 23:19
    
@Migs, the invariant of reverse iterators is: &*(reverse_iterator(i))==&*(i - 1). Map backwards from that (or just think about deleting rbegin()) and you get to the code in the answer. –  MSN Dec 23 '11 at 23:22
    
Thanks @MSN. It worked perfectly. I read that invariant in Dobbs' article, but I guess I just can't grasp the implications of it. I'll keep staring until something (hopefully) happens. –  Migs Dec 23 '11 at 23:25
    
@Migs, I had to think about it too. But if you think about deleting rbegin() + 1 in [0, 1, 2, 3, 4], the result of deleting the correct forward iterator (via .erase())is exactly where you want the reverse iterator to be built on top of. –  MSN Dec 23 '11 at 23:27
    
@MichaelBurr, I was showing what to add to his snippet, but I'll edit it to make it more obvious. –  MSN Dec 24 '11 at 4:59

Most erase() implementations I have seen return the next iterator in the sequence for exactly this kind of situation, eg:

std::list<int>::reverse_iterator it = list.rbegin();
while( it != list.rend() )
{
    int value = *it;
    if( some_cond_met_on(value) )
    {
        it = list.erase( it );
    }
    else
    {
        ++it;
    }
}
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