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In C++, or in general, which of the following two approaches is considered better style and why?

Approach 1

// Instantiate an Application object
Application application;

// Initialise the Application
application.initWithParams(
    "WindowTitle",
    800,
    600
);

Approach 2

// Instantiate and initialise an Application object
Application application =  *new Application(
    "WindowTitle",
    800,
    600
);

PS: This code would go directly into my main function. I haven't tested approach two, and I don't know if there is a better way of doing this in C++?

EDIT: Approach 3 (from Pubby)

// Instantiate an Application object
Application application(
    "WindowTitle",
    800,
    600
);
share|improve this question
3  
The second is out, without any consideration of style, as it is a guaranteed memory leak. –  Benjamin Lindley Dec 23 '11 at 23:26
1  
A good book on C++ would probably be the best advice at this point. –  Kerrek SB Dec 24 '11 at 0:43
    
@KerrekSB It sounds a lot worse than it actually is ;) –  Ben Dec 24 '11 at 3:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Why not this?

// Instantiate an Application object
Application application(
    "WindowTitle",
    800,
    600
);

(First can usually be avoided. Never use the second)

share|improve this answer
    
Because I did not know that was possible. Thx! –  Ben Dec 23 '11 at 23:27
    
Sometimes, this is not possible, because you don't have all the information you need to pass to the constructor at the time of creation of the object. In that case, you would want to use a std::unique_ptr. –  Benjamin Lindley Dec 23 '11 at 23:30

Personally I would go for the constructor and arguments, since the other approach may leave your object in an unknown state. If you get too many arguments, you can wrap them in a ApplicationParameter class.

share|improve this answer
    
I did not comment on the new statement, as I did not think that would be the question, but I think it is good advise from Pubby to try and avoid it. –  Maarten Bodewes Dec 23 '11 at 23:27

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