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I'm currently trying to implement the FFT algorithm in java and am having a bit of trouble with it! I've tested all other parts of the algorithm well and they seem to be working fine.

The trouble I'm getting is that in the base case it returns a Complex number array, within the base case A[0] is populated. After the base cases have been executed, the for loop is executed where y0[0] and y1[0] are found to be null, despite assigning them to the base cases, pretty confused by this. This is shown in the System.out.println line

Can anyone tell me the errors of my ways?

    //This method implements the recursive FFT algorithm, it assumes the input length
//N is some power of two
private static Complex[] FFT(Complex[] A, int N) { 
    double real, imag;
    Complex A0[] = new Complex[((int) Math.ceil(N/2))]; 
    Complex A1[] = new Complex[((int) Math.ceil(N/2))];
    Complex[] omega = new Complex[N];
    Complex[] y = new Complex[N];
    Complex[] y0 = new Complex[((int) Math.ceil(N/2))];
    Complex[] y1 = new Complex[((int) Math.ceil(N/2))]; 

    //base case
    if (N == 1) {
        return A;
    }
    else {
        real = Math.cos((2*Math.PI)/N); if (real < 1E-10 && real > 0) real = 0;
        imag = Math.sin((2*Math.PI)/N); if (imag < 1E-10 && imag > 0) imag = 0;
        omega[N-1] = new Complex(real, imag);
        omega[0] = new Complex(1, 0);
        A0 = splitInput(A, 1);
        A1 = splitInput(A, 0);
        //recursive calls
        y0 = FFT(A0, N/2);
        y1 = FFT(A1, N/2);
        for (int k = 0; k < ((N/2)-1); k++) {
            System.out.print("k: " + k + ", y0: " + y0[k]); System.out.println(", y1: " + y1[k]);
            y[k] = y0[k].plus(omega[k].times(y1[k]));
            y[k+(N/2)] = y0[k].minus(omega[k].times(y1[k]));
            omega[0] = omega[0].times(omega[N]);
        }
        return y;
    }
}

Here is the code for my splitInput method as requested

//This method takes a double array as an argument and returns every even or odd
//element according to the second int argument being 1 or 0
private static Complex[] splitInput(Complex[] input, int even) {
    Complex[] newArray = new Complex[(input.length/2)];

    //Return all even elements of double array, including 0
    if (even == 1) {
        for (int i = 0; i < (input.length/2); i++) {
            newArray[i] = new Complex(input[i*2].re, 0.0);
        }
        return newArray;
    }
    //Return all odd elements of double array
    else {
        for (int i = 0; i < (input.length/2); i++) {
            newArray[i] = new Complex (input[(i*2) + 1].re, 0.0);
        }
    return newArray;
    }
}

EDIT: I've updated my code according to your suggestions, still getting a null pointer exception from the line y[k] = y0[k].plus(omega[k].times(y1[k])); as y0 & y1 are still null after the base case :( any further ideas? Here's the updated algorithm

//This method implements the recursive FFT algorithm, it assumes the input length
//N is some power of two
private static Complex[] FFT(Complex[] A, int N) { 
    double real, imag;
    Complex[] omega = new Complex[N];
    Complex[] y = new Complex[N];
    Complex[] A0;
    Complex[] A1;
    Complex[] y0;
    Complex[] y1;

    //base case
    if (N == 1) {
        return A;
    }
    else {
        real = Math.cos((2*Math.PI)/N); if (real < 1E-10 && real > 0) real = 0;
        imag = Math.sin((2*Math.PI)/N); if (imag < 1E-10 && imag > 0) imag = 0;;
        omega[N-1] = new Complex(real, imag);
        omega[0] = new Complex(1, 0);
        A0 = splitInput(A, 1);
        A1 = splitInput(A, 0);
        //recursive calls
        y0 = FFT(A0, N/2);
        y1 = FFT(A1, N/2);
        for (int k = 0; k < ((N/2)-1); k++) {
            y[k] = y0[k].plus(omega[k].times(y1[k]));
            y[k+(N/2)] = y0[k].minus(omega[k].times(y1[k]));
            omega[0] = omega[0].times(omega[N-1]);
        }
        return y;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
The code for splitInput and how you initially call FFT would be helpful. Also, it's not clear what you mean by "the base case". It's possible your mistake comes from a new Complex[...] which contains an array of nulls at creation instead of true instances of Complex. –  toto2 Dec 24 '11 at 0:34
    
I call FFT with the line output = FFT(inputComplex, inputComplex.length); The base case is when the size of the input N is one. And i see what you mean, but they are assigned from the base case upwards –  Will Andrew Dec 24 '11 at 10:11
    
Just a comment: you should not use the array length as a method parameter since it is already included in the array. That's called data duplication and it brings you no advantage, but you can get in an inconsistent state if you make some mistake somewhere. In Fortran and C, you have to pass the array length, but it's really not necessary in Java. –  toto2 Dec 24 '11 at 13:46
    
noted, thank you –  Will Andrew Dec 24 '11 at 20:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Problems that jump out:

  1. (int) Math.ceil(N/2) You're still doing an int division, so the Math.ceil() has no effect, and your split arrays are probably incorrect for odd n
  2. you only ever populate omega[0] and omega[N-1], I would expect a NullPointerException when you try to access omega[1], which would happen when N >= 6.
  3. omega[N], as also mentioned by sarnold
  4. You allocate A0 and A1, and later assign them the results of splitInput
share|improve this answer
    
1) I was unsure of how Java approaches int division and for the case that N == 1 i just wanted to be sure that N/2 definitely returned 1 and not 0 2) I'm assuming that N is some power of 2 3) same again 4) what's wrong with that? Thanks for your help! –  Will Andrew Dec 24 '11 at 10:27
    
I overlooked the 'power of 2' condition, so the oddness problem isn't really one here. Generally, to get ceiling(n/2) for nonnegative integers, (n+1)/2 does it. 2) N == 8? Then you'd access omega[1] which would be null. 3) independent of whether N is a power of 2, with omega = new Complex[N], omega[N] is out of bounds. 4) A0 = new Complex[N]; A0 = someFunction() creates an array for A0 to refer to and immediately after lets A0 refer to some other array, so the first can be garbage-collected. Not 'wrong' in the sense that it produces wrong results, just pointless. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 24 '11 at 12:05
    
Right, i've updated my original post with the new version, still getting a nullpointerexception :( 1) not needed anymore but thanks 2) Not sure what you mean, why would omega[1] be accessed? 3) Fixed thank you (changed to omega[N-1]) 4) Fixed again. Thank you very much for your help so far! –  Will Andrew Dec 28 '11 at 18:52
    
Re 2): in y[k] = y0[k].plus(omega[k].times(y1[k]));, k < N/2-1. If N > 5, k can become 1, so then omega[1] better be not null. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 28 '11 at 22:27
    
Understood thank you –  Will Andrew Dec 29 '11 at 10:06

A few thoughts:

Any time I see something repeated as often as Math.ceil(N/2) is here, I think it justifies having its own named variable. (I know naming variables isn't always easy, but I find it vital for legibility.)

Complex A0[] = new Complex[((int) Math.ceil(N/2))];
Complex A1[] = new Complex[((int) Math.ceil(N/2))];

Note that when N==1, the computation results in new Complex[0]. I'm not sure what this does, but I think I'd put the N == 1 base-case check before the memory allocations.

Complex[] y0 = new Complex[((int) Math.ceil(N/2))];
Complex[] y1 = new Complex[((int) Math.ceil(N/2))];
/* ... */
    y0 = FFT(A0, N/2);
    y1 = FFT(A1, N/2);

I believe you can skip the new Complex[...] allocations for these arrays because you never actually store anything into them.

Complex[] omega = new Complex[N];
/* ... */
        omega[0] = omega[0].times(omega[N]);

I'm surprised this hasn't blown up yet -- omega[N] should raise an IndexOutOfBounds exception.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help, very much appreciated. I've updated my original post to include the revised version which is still raising a null pointer exception, any suggestions? –  Will Andrew Dec 28 '11 at 18:53

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