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I only care about 12 colors:

red: RGB: 255, 0, 0
pink: RGB: 255, 192, 203
violet: RGB: 36, 10, 64
blue: RGB: 0, 0, 255
green: RGB: 0, 255, 0
yellow: RGB: 255, 255, 0
orange: RGB: 255, 104, 31
white: RGB: 255, 255, 255
black: RGB: 0, 0, 0
gray: RGB: 128, 128, 128
tea: RGB: 193, 186, 176
cream: RGB: 255, 253, 208

When i read the pixel of bitmap, i can get the Hue value:

int picw = mBitmap.getWidth();
    int pich = mBitmap.getHeight();
    int[] pix = new int[picw * pich];
    float[] HSV = new float[3];

    // get pixel array from source
    mBitmap.getPixels(pix, 0, picw, 0, 0, picw, pich);

    int index = 0;
    // iteration through pixels
    for(int y = 0; y < pich; ++y) {
        for(int x = 0; x < picw; ++x) {
            // get current index in 2D-matrix
            index = y * picw + x;               
            // convert to HSV
            Color.colorToHSV(pix[index], HSV);
            // increase Saturation level
            //HSV[0] = Hue
            Log.i(getCallingPackage(), String.valueOf(HSV[0]));
        }
    }

Now i want to know what color of this pixel (only in 12 above colors)?

I use HSV to see the range of color. When i have a color which doesn't in this list, i want to name it as similarly color in my list How can i do it?

Thanks you so much

share|improve this question
    
To get the colour closest to one of your 12 colours, you have to basically qualify how good some RGB value matches each of them. The most straightforward approach would probably be to calculate the absolute differences for each of the three colour components and sum these up. The colour with the smallest difference will then be your best match. Do realise though that this might become quite computationally expensive, as you will have to do this width * height * 12 times, although some optimizations are definitely possible. – MH. Dec 24 '11 at 2:38
    
Must i have convert from RBG to HSV? – ZuzooVn Dec 24 '11 at 2:54
    
I'm not sure what you mean. As far as I can tell you have the RGB values for your 12 colours and Rajdeep's answer shows you how to get the three colour components for a specific pixel. What would you need the HSV values for? – MH. Dec 24 '11 at 3:21
    
i mean, when i have a pixel, i want to know to the name of color. When i have some type of red: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_colors#Red i want to mark them only as red. I need HSV to know the color range – ZuzooVn Dec 24 '11 at 13:34
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Based on your comments it seems you're basically trying to reduce the bitmap's full colour palette to only the 12 you specified. Obviously for every pixel in the bitmap the 'best match' from those 12 should be picked.

I still don't see why you would need the HSV values, as it's just a different representation of the RGB components - it doesn't actually change the problem, or its solution.

A straightforward approach to find the best match for any RGB colour would look something like as follows.

First build some sort of a list containing the colours you want to match against. I've used a Map, since you mentioned you (also) wanted to know the name of the colour, not just the RGB value.

Map<String, Integer> mColors = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
mColors.put("red", Color.rgb(255, 0, 0));
mColors.put("pink", Color.rgb(255, 192, 203));
mColors.put("voilet", Color.rgb(36, 10, 64));
mColors.put("blue", Color.rgb(0, 0, 255));
mColors.put("green", Color.rgb(0, 255, 0));
mColors.put("yellow", Color.rgb(255, 255, 0));
mColors.put("orange", Color.rgb(255, 104, 31));
mColors.put("white", Color.rgb(255, 255, 255));
mColors.put("black", Color.rgb(0, 0, 0));
mColors.put("gray", Color.rgb(128, 128, 128));
mColors.put("tea", Color.rgb(193, 186, 176));
mColors.put("cream", Color.rgb(255, 253, 208));

Then just make a method that will tell you the best match. You can call this from within your second for loop and pass it the current pixel colour. I've added some inline comments to explain the different steps, but it's really quite trivial.

private String getBestMatchingColorName(int pixelColor) {
    // largest difference is 255 for every colour component
    int currentDifference = 3 * 255;
    // name of the best matching colour
    String closestColorName = null;
    // get int values for all three colour components of the pixel
    int pixelColorR = Color.red(pixelColor);
    int pixelColorG = Color.green(pixelColor);
    int pixelColorB = Color.blue(pixelColor);

    Iterator<String> colorNameIterator = mColors.keySet().iterator();
    // continue iterating if the map contains a next colour and the difference is greater than zero.
    // a difference of zero means we've found an exact match, so there's no point in iterating further.
    while (colorNameIterator.hasNext() && currentDifference > 0) {
        // this colour's name
        String currentColorName = colorNameIterator.next();
        // this colour's int value
        int color = mColors.get(currentColorName);
        // get int values for all three colour components of this colour
        int colorR = Color.red(color);
        int colorG = Color.green(color);
        int colorB = Color.blue(color); 
        // calculate sum of absolute differences that indicates how good this match is 
        int difference = Math.abs(pixelColorR - colorR) + Math.abs(pixelColorG - colorG) + Math.abs(pixelColorB - colorB);
        // a smaller difference means a better match, so keep track of it
        if (currentDifference > difference) {
            currentDifference = difference;
            closestColorName = currentColorName;
        }
    }
    return closestColorName;
}

The results for a quick test using some of the predefined Color constants:

Color.RED (-65536) -> red (-65536)
Color.GREEN (-16711936) -> green (-16711936)
Color.BLUE (-16776961) -> blue (-16776961)
Color.BLACK (-16777216) -> black (-16777216)
Color.WHITE (-1) -> white (-1)
Color.GRAY (-7829368) -> gray (-8355712)
Color.YELLOW (-256) -> yellow (-256)
Color.MAGENTA (-65281) -> pink (-16181)

The first number inbetween the brackets is the actual int value for the Color constant, the second is the int value for the best match found, with the name right in front of it.

The result for Color.MAGENTA also illustrates why you should not just compare the colour's int value directly. The actual int value is -65281, which is quite close to the value for Color.RED (-65536). However, the best match based on the different components is 'pink', which has a -16181 value. Obviously this makes complete sense knowing that a colour is defined as 4 bytes:

Colors are represented as packed ints, made up of 4 bytes: alpha, red, green, blue. (...) The components are stored as follows (alpha << 24) | (red << 16) | (green << 8) | blue.

Source: android.graphics.Color reference.

// Edit: with HSV values it seems to work fine too. I did get a different result for 'magenta' as closest match though - violet, in stead of pink. You might want to double check the values and breakpoint some stuff. For instance, I can imagine it might be better to normalize the 'H' part. That's up to you...

private String getBestMatchingHsvColor(int pixelColor) {
    // largest difference is 360(H), 1(S), 1(V)
    float currentDifference = 360 + 1 + 1;
    // name of the best matching colour
    String closestColorName = null;
    // get HSV values for the pixel's colour
    float[] pixelColorHsv = new float[3];
    Color.colorToHSV(pixelColor, pixelColorHsv);

    Iterator<String> colorNameIterator = mColors.keySet().iterator();
    // continue iterating if the map contains a next colour and the difference is greater than zero.
    // a difference of zero means we've found an exact match, so there's not point in iterating further.
    while (colorNameIterator.hasNext() && currentDifference > 0) {
        // this colour's name
        String currentColorName = colorNameIterator.next();
        // this colour's int value
        int color = mColors.get(currentColorName);
        // get HSV values for this colour
        float[] colorHsv = new float[3];
        Color.colorToHSV(color, colorHsv);
        // calculate sum of absolute differences that indicates how good this match is 
        float difference = Math.abs(pixelColorHsv[0] - colorHsv[0]) + Math.abs(pixelColorHsv[1] - colorHsv[1]) + Math.abs(pixelColorHsv[2] - colorHsv[2]);
        // a smaller difference means a better match, so store it
        if (currentDifference > difference) {
            currentDifference = difference;
            closestColorName = currentColorName;
        }
    }
    return closestColorName;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thanks for your answer, but i have to use HSV mode – ZuzooVn Dec 25 '11 at 15:14
    
Could you please tell me the solution with HSV, i have to use HSV. Thanks you – ZuzooVn Dec 27 '11 at 5:27
    
Have you already tried above approach with HSV values? – MH. Dec 28 '11 at 18:07
    
It doesnt work, so sad :( – ZuzooVn Dec 29 '11 at 16:00
1  
I had little issues... check updated answer. The finishing touches are up to you. – MH. Dec 29 '11 at 19:07

Since you already have pixel color value in int. You can extract the RGB value using following methods

int green = Color.green(pix[i]);
int red   = Color.red(pix[i]);
int blue  = Color.blue(pix[i]);

And then compare with the RGB values you have

share|improve this answer
    
When i have a color that doesn't in my list, i want to use a similarly color in list, so that i convert it in to HSV. For example : red : 0 -> 18, 306-> 359 orange : 19 -> 41 yellow: 42 -> 69 green: 70 -> 166 blue: 167 -> 251 violet: 252 -> 305 – ZuzooVn Dec 24 '11 at 2:06
    
Question is not very clear, can you elaborate a little – Rajdeep Dua Dec 24 '11 at 2:09
    
i mean, when i have a pixel, i want to know to the name of color. When i have some type of red: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_colors#Red i want to mark them only as red – ZuzooVn Dec 24 '11 at 2:22
    
I guess you have to compile an array of such ints and compare. – Rajdeep Dua Dec 24 '11 at 2:43

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