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Why I ask this question:

I know there have been a lot of questions about AES encryption, even for Android. And there are lots of code snippets if you search the Web. But on every single page, in every Stack Overflow question, I find another implementation with major differences.

So I created this question to find a "best practice". I hope we can collect a list of the most important requirements and set up an implementation that is really secure!

I read about initialization vectors and salts. Not all implementations I found had these features. So do you need it? Does it increase the security a lot? How do you implement it? Should the algorithm raise exceptions if the encrypted data cannot be decrypted? Or is that insecure and it should just return an unreadable string? Can the algorithm use Bcrypt instead of SHA?

What about these two implementations I found? Are they okay? Perfect or some important things missing? What of these is secure?

The algorithm should take a string and a "password" for encryption and then encrypt the string with that password. The output should be a string (hex or base64?) again. Decryption should be possible as well, of course.

What is the perfect AES implementation for Android?

Implementation #1:

import java.security.MessageDigest;
import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException;
import java.security.NoSuchProviderException;
import java.security.SecureRandom;

import javax.crypto.Cipher;
import javax.crypto.SecretKey;
import javax.crypto.SecretKeyFactory;
import javax.crypto.spec.IvParameterSpec;
import javax.crypto.spec.PBEKeySpec;
import javax.crypto.spec.SecretKeySpec;

public class AdvancedCrypto implements ICrypto {

        public static final String PROVIDER = "BC";
        public static final int SALT_LENGTH = 20;
        public static final int IV_LENGTH = 16;
        public static final int PBE_ITERATION_COUNT = 100;

        private static final String RANDOM_ALGORITHM = "SHA1PRNG";
        private static final String HASH_ALGORITHM = "SHA-512";
        private static final String PBE_ALGORITHM = "PBEWithSHA256And256BitAES-CBC-BC";
        private static final String CIPHER_ALGORITHM = "AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding";
        private static final String SECRET_KEY_ALGORITHM = "AES";

        public String encrypt(SecretKey secret, String cleartext) throws CryptoException {
                try {

                        byte[] iv = generateIv();
                        String ivHex = HexEncoder.toHex(iv);
                        IvParameterSpec ivspec = new IvParameterSpec(iv);

                        Cipher encryptionCipher = Cipher.getInstance(CIPHER_ALGORITHM, PROVIDER);
                        encryptionCipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, secret, ivspec);
                        byte[] encryptedText = encryptionCipher.doFinal(cleartext.getBytes("UTF-8"));
                        String encryptedHex = HexEncoder.toHex(encryptedText);

                        return ivHex + encryptedHex;

                } catch (Exception e) {
                        throw new CryptoException("Unable to encrypt", e);
                }
        }

        public String decrypt(SecretKey secret, String encrypted) throws CryptoException {
                try {
                        Cipher decryptionCipher = Cipher.getInstance(CIPHER_ALGORITHM, PROVIDER);
                        String ivHex = encrypted.substring(0, IV_LENGTH * 2);
                        String encryptedHex = encrypted.substring(IV_LENGTH * 2);
                        IvParameterSpec ivspec = new IvParameterSpec(HexEncoder.toByte(ivHex));
                        decryptionCipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, secret, ivspec);
                        byte[] decryptedText = decryptionCipher.doFinal(HexEncoder.toByte(encryptedHex));
                        String decrypted = new String(decryptedText, "UTF-8");
                        return decrypted;
                } catch (Exception e) {
                        throw new CryptoException("Unable to decrypt", e);
                }
        }

        public SecretKey getSecretKey(String password, String salt) throws CryptoException {
                try {
                        PBEKeySpec pbeKeySpec = new PBEKeySpec(password.toCharArray(), HexEncoder.toByte(salt), PBE_ITERATION_COUNT, 256);
                        SecretKeyFactory factory = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance(PBE_ALGORITHM, PROVIDER);
                        SecretKey tmp = factory.generateSecret(pbeKeySpec);
                        SecretKey secret = new SecretKeySpec(tmp.getEncoded(), SECRET_KEY_ALGORITHM);
                        return secret;
                } catch (Exception e) {
                        throw new CryptoException("Unable to get secret key", e);
                }
        }

        public String getHash(String password, String salt) throws CryptoException {
                try {
                        String input = password + salt;
                        MessageDigest md = MessageDigest.getInstance(HASH_ALGORITHM, PROVIDER);
                        byte[] out = md.digest(input.getBytes("UTF-8"));
                        return HexEncoder.toHex(out);
                } catch (Exception e) {
                        throw new CryptoException("Unable to get hash", e);
                }
        }

        public String generateSalt() throws CryptoException {
                try {
                        SecureRandom random = SecureRandom.getInstance(RANDOM_ALGORITHM);
                        byte[] salt = new byte[SALT_LENGTH];
                        random.nextBytes(salt);
                        String saltHex = HexEncoder.toHex(salt);
                        return saltHex;
                } catch (Exception e) {
                        throw new CryptoException("Unable to generate salt", e);
                }
        }

        private byte[] generateIv() throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, NoSuchProviderException {
                SecureRandom random = SecureRandom.getInstance(RANDOM_ALGORITHM);
                byte[] iv = new byte[IV_LENGTH];
                random.nextBytes(iv);
                return iv;
        }

}

Source: http://pocket-for-android.1047292.n5.nabble.com/Encryption-method-and-reading-the-Dropbox-backup-td4344194.html

Implementation #2:

import java.security.SecureRandom;

import javax.crypto.Cipher;
import javax.crypto.KeyGenerator;
import javax.crypto.SecretKey;
import javax.crypto.spec.SecretKeySpec;

/**
 * Usage:
 * <pre>
 * String crypto = SimpleCrypto.encrypt(masterpassword, cleartext)
 * ...
 * String cleartext = SimpleCrypto.decrypt(masterpassword, crypto)
 * </pre>
 * @author ferenc.hechler
 */
public class SimpleCrypto {

    public static String encrypt(String seed, String cleartext) throws Exception {
        byte[] rawKey = getRawKey(seed.getBytes());
        byte[] result = encrypt(rawKey, cleartext.getBytes());
        return toHex(result);
    }

    public static String decrypt(String seed, String encrypted) throws Exception {
        byte[] rawKey = getRawKey(seed.getBytes());
        byte[] enc = toByte(encrypted);
        byte[] result = decrypt(rawKey, enc);
        return new String(result);
    }

    private static byte[] getRawKey(byte[] seed) throws Exception {
        KeyGenerator kgen = KeyGenerator.getInstance("AES");
        SecureRandom sr = SecureRandom.getInstance("SHA1PRNG");
        sr.setSeed(seed);
        kgen.init(128, sr); // 192 and 256 bits may not be available
        SecretKey skey = kgen.generateKey();
        byte[] raw = skey.getEncoded();
        return raw;
    }


    private static byte[] encrypt(byte[] raw, byte[] clear) throws Exception {
        SecretKeySpec skeySpec = new SecretKeySpec(raw, "AES");
        Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES");
        cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, skeySpec);
        byte[] encrypted = cipher.doFinal(clear);
        return encrypted;
    }

    private static byte[] decrypt(byte[] raw, byte[] encrypted) throws Exception {
        SecretKeySpec skeySpec = new SecretKeySpec(raw, "AES");
        Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES");
        cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, skeySpec);
        byte[] decrypted = cipher.doFinal(encrypted);
        return decrypted;
    }

    public static String toHex(String txt) {
        return toHex(txt.getBytes());
    }
    public static String fromHex(String hex) {
        return new String(toByte(hex));
    }

    public static byte[] toByte(String hexString) {
        int len = hexString.length()/2;
        byte[] result = new byte[len];
        for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
            result[i] = Integer.valueOf(hexString.substring(2*i, 2*i+2), 16).byteValue();
        return result;
    }

    public static String toHex(byte[] buf) {
        if (buf == null)
            return "";
        StringBuffer result = new StringBuffer(2*buf.length);
        for (int i = 0; i < buf.length; i++) {
            appendHex(result, buf[i]);
        }
        return result.toString();
    }
    private final static String HEX = "0123456789ABCDEF";
    private static void appendHex(StringBuffer sb, byte b) {
        sb.append(HEX.charAt((b>>4)&0x0f)).append(HEX.charAt(b&0x0f));
    }

}

Source: http://www.tutorials-android.com/learn/How_to_encrypt_and_decrypt_strings.rhtml

share|improve this question
    
I am trying to implement the solution 1 but it needed some classes. do you have the full source code? –  albanx Jun 25 '12 at 21:11
1  
No, I haven't, sorry. But I got it working by simply deleting implements ICrypto and changing throws CryptoException to throws Exception and so on. So you won't need those classes anymore. –  Marco W. Jun 25 '12 at 21:37
    
But also the HexEncoder class is missing? Where can I found it? –  albanx Jun 26 '12 at 9:03
    
HexEncoder is part of the BouncyCastle library, I think. You can just download it. Or you can google for "byte[] to hex" and the other way round in Java. –  Marco W. Jun 26 '12 at 21:05
    
Thank you Marco. But I notice that there are 3 methods getSecretKey, getHash, generateSalt in the first implementation that are unused. Maybe I am wrong but how could this class be used to encrypt a string in practice? –  albanx Jun 27 '12 at 20:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Keys and Hashes

I will start discussing the password-based system with salts. The salt is a randomly generated number. It is not "deduced". Implementation 1 includes a generateSalt() method that generates a cryptographically strong random number. Because the salt is important to security, it should be kept secret once it is generated, though it only needs to be generated once. If this is a Web site, it's relatively easy to keep the salt secret, but for installed applications (for desktop and mobile devices), this will be much more difficult, as such applications are assumed not to keep secrets.

The method getHash() returns a hash of the given password and salt, concatenated into a single string. The algorithm used is SHA-512, which returns a 512-bit hash. This method returns a hash that's useful for checking a string's integrity, so it might as well be used by calling getHash() with just a password or just a salt, since it simply concatenates both parameters.

The method getSecretKey(), on the other hand, derives a key from a password and salt. The algorithm used is PBKDF1 (I think) from PKCS5 with SHA-256 as the hash function, and returns a 256-bit key. getSecretKey() generates a key by repeatedly generating hashes of the password, salt, and a counter (up to the iteration count given in PBE_ITERATION_COUNT, here 100) in order to increase the time needed to mount a brute-force attack. The salt's length should be at least as long as the key being generated, in this case, at least 256 bits. The iteration count should be set as long as possible without causing unreasonable delay. It should be 1000 or more, although if a much higher number doesn't cause unreasonable delay, it should be used. For more information on salts and iteration counts in key derivation, see section 4 in RFC2898.

The implementation in Java's PBE, however, is flawed if the password contains Unicode characters, that is, those that require more than 8 bits to be represented. As stated in PBEKeySpec, "the PBE mechanism defined in PKCS #5 looks at only the low order 8 bits of each character". To work around this problem, you can try generating a hex string (which will contain only 8-bit characters) of all 16-bit characters in the password before passing it to PBEKeySpec. For example, "ABC" becomes "004100420043". In fact, you might as well use a char array as a parameter for the password, since for security purposes, PBEKeySpec "requests the password as a char array, so it can be overwritten [with clearPassword()] when done".

Encryption

Once a key is generated, we can use it to encrypt and decrypt text. In implementation 1, the cipher algorithm used is AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding, that is, AES in the Cipher Block Chaining cipher mode, with padding defined in PKCS#5. This algorithm accepts keys of 128, 192, or 256 bits (though the latter two sizes may not always be available in all implementations).

AES supports several cipher modes, some of which are the following.

  • CBC is a cipher mode where each block of plaintext is combined (through XOR) with the previous (encrypted) block before encrypting, and the first block is combined (through XOR) with a so-called initialization vector (or IV) before encrypting. In the Java implementation, a random IV is generated (with the IvParameterSpec class) and placed at the beginning of the cipher text. The IV is 16 bytes (128 bits) long, as given in IV_LENGTH. This is exactly the same length as a block in AES.
  • The ECB mode (the default AES mode) is not recommended since identical blocks will be encrypted in the same way with the same key. This is equivalent to using no IV at all, though it does form the basis for other cipher modes, most of which do use IVs.
  • In counter mode (CTR), the 16-byte IV is a counter, which is increased by 1 after each block. For each block, the counter is encrypted and is combined (through XOR) with that block to produce the ciphertext or plaintext.
  • Galois counter mode (GCM) provides integrity protection, however it is not available in all Java versions, is strictly speaking a cipher, rather than a mode, and strongly recommends a "unique" IV to ensure its security.

If the encrypted text will be made available to outsiders, then applying a message authentication code, or MAC, to the encrypted data (and optionally additional parameters) is recommended to protect its integrity. Popular here are hash-based MACs, or HMACs, that are based on SHA-1, SHA-256, or other secure hash functions. If a MAC is used, however, using a secret that's at least twice as long as a normal encryption key is recommended, to avoid related key attacks: the first half serves as the encryption key, and the second half serves as the key for the MAC. (That is, in this case, generate a single secret from a password and salt, and split that secret in two.)

Java Implementation

The various functions in implementation 1 uses a specific provider, namely "BC", for its algorithms. In general, though, it is not recommended to request specific providers, since not all providers are available on all Java implementations, see the Introduction to Oracle Providers. Thus, PROVIDER should not exist and the string -BC should probably be removed from PBE_ALGORITHM. Implementation 2 is correct in this respect.

It is inappropriate for a method to catch all exceptions, but rather to handle only the exceptions it can. The various cryptography classes can throw a variety of checked exceptions. A method can choose to wrap only those checked exceptions with CryptoException, or specify those checked exceptions in the throws clause. For convenience, wrapping the original exception with CryptoException may be appropriate here, since there are potentially many checked exceptions the classes can throw.

The getHash method hashes a UTF-8 version of the password plus salt. Since it won't be used in the password-based encryption system, I won't be discussing it further.

The getSecretKey method, however, derives a key from a char array of the password and a hex-encoded salt, as returned from generateSalt(). Because of the problems I just mentioned with PBEKeySpec, I recommend having getSecretKey pass a char array of the password instead of a String, preferably with the workaround I mentioned above. I don't see any problems, though, with representing a salt as a hex-encoded string.

The encrypt and decrypt methods use a UTF-8 encoded version of the plaintext and return a hex-encoded ciphertext. The ciphertext can also be base-64 (since the exact representation shouldn't matter as long as it's encrypted and is used the same way by both encrypt and decrypt) but if you use a MAC, I recommend applying the MAC to the ciphertext byte array rather than its hex or base-64 representation.

share|improve this answer
    
That double secret generation is a bit wasteful in my opinion, you could as easily split the generated secret in two, or - if not enough bits are available - add a counter (1 for the first key, 2 for the second key) to the secret and perform a single hash. No need to perform all the iterations twice. –  owlstead Dec 30 '11 at 22:45
    
Thanks for the information on HMAC and the salt. I won't use HMAC this time but later it might be very useful. And in general, this is a good thing, no doubt. –  Marco W. Dec 31 '11 at 13:21
    
Thank you very much for all the edits and this (now) wonderful introduction to AES encryption in Java! –  Marco W. Jan 2 '12 at 0:30
1  
It should. getInstance has an overload that takes only the name of the algorithm. Example: Cipher.getInstance() Several providers, including Bouncy Castle, may be registered in the Java implementation and this kind of overload searches the list of providers for one of them that implements the given algorithm. You should try it and see. –  Peter O. Jan 2 '12 at 1:31
1  
Yup, it will search the providers in the order given by Security.getProviders() - although it will now also check if the key is accepted by that provider during the init() call allowing for hardware assisted encryption. More details here: docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/technotes/guides/security/crypto/…. –  owlstead Jan 2 '12 at 19:04

#2 should never be used as it uses only "AES" (which means ECB mode encryption on text, a big no-no) for the cipher. I'll just talk about #1.

The first implementation seems to adhere to best practices for encryption. The constants are generally OK, although both the salt size and the number of iterations for performing PBE are on the short side. Futhermore, it seems to be for AES-256 since the PBE key generation uses 256 as a hard coded value (a shame after all those constants). It uses CBC and PKCS5Padding which is at least what you would expect.

Completely missing is any authentication/integrity protection, so an attacker can change the cipher text. This means that padding oracle attacks are possible in a client/server model. It also means that an attacker can try and change the encrypted data. This will likely result in some error somewhere becaues the padding or content is not accepted by the application, but that's not a situation that you want to be in.

Exception handling and input validation could be enhanced, catching Exception is always wrong in my book. Furhtermore, the class implements ICrypt, which I don't know. I do know that having only methods without side effects in a class is a bit weird. Normally, you would make those static. There is no buffering of Cipher instances etc., so every required object gets created ad-nauseum. However, you can safely remove ICrypto from the definition it seems, in that case you could also refactor the code to static methods (or rewrite it to be more object oriented, your choice).

The problem is that any wrapper always makes assumptions about the use case. To say that a wrapper is right or wrong is therefore bunk. This is why I always try to avoid generating wrapper classes. But at least it does not seem explicitly wrong. Personally, I think this question is better suited for the codereview part of stackoverflow otherwise.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for this detailed answer! I know it's a shame but I didn't know the code review section yet :D Thanks for this hint, I'll check that out. But this question does also fit here in my opinion as I don't just want a review of these code snippets. Instead, I want to ask you all what aspects are important when implementing AES encryption in Android. And you're right again, this code snippet is for AES-256. So you would say that this is general a safe implementation of AES-256? The use case is that I just want to safely store text information in a database. –  Marco W. Dec 30 '11 at 1:40
1  
It looks good, but the idea of not having integrity checks and authentication would bother me. If you have enough space I would seriously consider adding a HMAC over the ciphertext. That said, as you are probably trying to simply add confidentiality, I would consider it a big plus, but not directly a requirement. –  owlstead Dec 30 '11 at 3:01
    
But if the intention is only that others should not have access to the encrypted information, I don't need a HMAC, right? If they change the ciphertext and force a "wrong" result of decryption, there's no real problem, is there? –  Marco W. Dec 30 '11 at 3:23
    
If that is not in your risk scenario, then that is fine. If they can somehow trigger a repeated decrypt by the system after altering the cipher text (a padding oracle attack) then they could decrypt the data without ever knowing the key. They cannot do this if they simply get hold of the data on a system that does not have the key. But that's why it is always best practice to add a HMAC. Personally, I would consider a system with AES-128 and HMAC safer than AES-256 without - but as said, probably not required. –  owlstead Dec 30 '11 at 3:37
1  
Why not use AES in Galois/Counter-mode (AES-GCM) if you want integrity? –  Kimvais Dec 30 '11 at 20:00

You have asked a pretty interesting question. As with all algorithms the cipher key is the "secret sauce", since once that's known to the public, everything else is too. So you look into ways to this document by Google

security

Besides Google In-App Billing also gives thoughts on security which is insightful as well

billing_best_practices

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for these links! What exactly do you mean by "when the cipher key is out, everything else is out too"? –  Marco W. Jan 1 '12 at 20:06
    
What I mean is that encryption key needs to be secure, if anyone can get hold of that, then your encrypted data is as good as plaintext. Please upvote if you found my answer helpful to a degree :-) –  the100rabh Jan 2 '12 at 4:37
    
Of course, I found it useful. I just wanted to resolve this. –  Marco W. Jan 3 '12 at 0:00

Use BouncyCastle Lightweight API. It provides 256 AES With PBE and Salt.
Here sample code, which can encrypt/decrypt files.

public void encrypt(InputStream fin, OutputStream fout, String password) {
    try {
        PKCS12ParametersGenerator pGen = new PKCS12ParametersGenerator(new SHA256Digest());
        char[] passwordChars = password.toCharArray();
        final byte[] pkcs12PasswordBytes = PBEParametersGenerator.PKCS12PasswordToBytes(passwordChars);
        pGen.init(pkcs12PasswordBytes, salt.getBytes(), iterationCount);
        CBCBlockCipher aesCBC = new CBCBlockCipher(new AESEngine());
        ParametersWithIV aesCBCParams = (ParametersWithIV) pGen.generateDerivedParameters(256, 128);
        aesCBC.init(true, aesCBCParams);
        PaddedBufferedBlockCipher aesCipher = new PaddedBufferedBlockCipher(aesCBC, new PKCS7Padding());
        aesCipher.init(true, aesCBCParams);

        // Read in the decrypted bytes and write the cleartext to out
        int numRead = 0;
        while ((numRead = fin.read(buf)) >= 0) {
            if (numRead == 1024) {
                byte[] plainTemp = new byte[aesCipher.getUpdateOutputSize(numRead)];
                int offset = aesCipher.processBytes(buf, 0, numRead, plainTemp, 0);
                final byte[] plain = new byte[offset];
                System.arraycopy(plainTemp, 0, plain, 0, plain.length);
                fout.write(plain, 0, plain.length);
            } else {
                byte[] plainTemp = new byte[aesCipher.getOutputSize(numRead)];
                int offset = aesCipher.processBytes(buf, 0, numRead, plainTemp, 0);
                int last = aesCipher.doFinal(plainTemp, offset);
                final byte[] plain = new byte[offset + last];
                System.arraycopy(plainTemp, 0, plain, 0, plain.length);
                fout.write(plain, 0, plain.length);
            }
        }
        fout.close();
        fin.close();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

}

public void decrypt(InputStream fin, OutputStream fout, String password) {
    try {
        PKCS12ParametersGenerator pGen = new PKCS12ParametersGenerator(new SHA256Digest());
        char[] passwordChars = password.toCharArray();
        final byte[] pkcs12PasswordBytes = PBEParametersGenerator.PKCS12PasswordToBytes(passwordChars);
        pGen.init(pkcs12PasswordBytes, salt.getBytes(), iterationCount);
        CBCBlockCipher aesCBC = new CBCBlockCipher(new AESEngine());
        ParametersWithIV aesCBCParams = (ParametersWithIV) pGen.generateDerivedParameters(256, 128);
        aesCBC.init(false, aesCBCParams);
        PaddedBufferedBlockCipher aesCipher = new PaddedBufferedBlockCipher(aesCBC, new PKCS7Padding());
        aesCipher.init(false, aesCBCParams);

        // Read in the decrypted bytes and write the cleartext to out
        int numRead = 0;
        while ((numRead = fin.read(buf)) >= 0) {
            if (numRead == 1024) {
                byte[] plainTemp = new byte[aesCipher.getUpdateOutputSize(numRead)];
                int offset = aesCipher.processBytes(buf, 0, numRead, plainTemp, 0);
                // int last = aesCipher.doFinal(plainTemp, offset);
                final byte[] plain = new byte[offset];
                System.arraycopy(plainTemp, 0, plain, 0, plain.length);
                fout.write(plain, 0, plain.length);
            } else {
                byte[] plainTemp = new byte[aesCipher.getOutputSize(numRead)];
                int offset = aesCipher.processBytes(buf, 0, numRead, plainTemp, 0);
                int last = aesCipher.doFinal(plainTemp, offset);
                final byte[] plain = new byte[offset + last];
                System.arraycopy(plainTemp, 0, plain, 0, plain.length);
                fout.write(plain, 0, plain.length);
            }
        }
        fout.close();
        fin.close();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! This is probably a good and secure solution but I don't want to use third party software. I'm sure it must be possible to implement AES in a safe way on one's own. –  Marco W. Dec 31 '11 at 13:18
2  
Depends if you want to include protection against side channel attacks. Generally, you should assume it is pretty unsafe to implement cryptographic algorithms on your own. As AES CBC is available in the Java runtime libs of Oracle, it's probably best to use those and use the Bouncy Castle libraries if an algorithm is unavailable. –  owlstead Jan 1 '12 at 21:37
    
It's missing the definition of buf (I really hope it's not a static field). It also looks like both encrypt() and decrypt() will fail to process the final block correctly if the input is a multiple of 1024 bytes. –  tc. May 24 '13 at 15:16

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