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I've noticed some bug in window.onload function. (Maybe it's my wrong) The problem is when I used following simple function, it worked on all browsers but Chrome.

var name=$("#name");
window.onload = function(){
    name.fadeIn(500);
};  

Then just for interest, tried this one too:

var name;
window.onload = function(){
    name=$("#name");
    name.fadeIn(500);
};  

In all above cases, Chrome's dev tools gave me this error message:

Uncaught TypeError: Object [object Object] has no method 'fadeIn'

I've resolved this error with following code.

window.onload = function(){
    var name=$("#name");
    name.fadeIn(500);
};  

But now want some explanation, why didn't work first 2 piece of code?

share|improve this question
1  
Don't know about the second example, but that first block of code may be requesting an element that doesn't exist yet. –  Jeffrey Sweeney Dec 24 '11 at 3:01
    
I cached name before working with it, var name=$("#name"); and again, on all other browsers it worked only CHROME gave error –  Tural Aliyev Dec 24 '11 at 3:02
    
What do you mean by caching? I'm not a JQuery expert, but if $() functions are essentially getElementById() functions, the name element may not have loaded into the DOM yet. Why it is exclusive to chrome is a puzzler though. Do you put your scripts at the bottom of the page by the way? –  Jeffrey Sweeney Dec 24 '11 at 3:06
    
yes the code is at the bottom. I told you that THIS SCRIPT WORKED ON ALL OTHER BROWSERS. imo there is no syntax error. –  Tural Aliyev Dec 24 '11 at 3:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think that this might be down to a global variable called name. If you call name something different, name1, it works in chrome.http://jsfiddle.net/R2PuZ/1/

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1  
OMG)). I didn't even think about this. Thank you –  Tural Aliyev Dec 24 '11 at 3:11
    
Yeah, I played around with it a bit... assigning a value to a global variable in Safari will acknowledge that it's an element, but it won't have any (or at least some) properties (such as innerHTML). Works in Firefox though. Very strange. –  Jeffrey Sweeney Dec 24 '11 at 3:15
    
yeah, one of those things that makes you burn the midnight oil:) It's very interesting that name is set to "result", which in the jsfiddle seems to come from the name of the iframe where the result is displayed. Still playing with it.. –  Pencho Ilchev Dec 24 '11 at 3:32
1  
Yep, if I open the src of the result iframe at fiddle.jshell.net/R2PuZ/1/show name is no longer set, however, it is still defined. –  Pencho Ilchev Dec 24 '11 at 3:39

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