Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am now using the following code to catch errors and throw exceptions in my service layer:

 ...
            if (pk == null || rk == null) return null;
            try
            {
                var item = repo.GetPkRk(pk, rk);
                return (T)item;
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                throw new ServiceException("", typeof(T).Name + rk + " data retrieval error");
            }
  ...

The ServiceException class:

public class ServiceException : ApplicationException {     
        public Dictionary<string, string> Errors { get; set; }
        public ServiceException() : this(null) {}enter code here
        public ServiceException(string key, string message)
        {
            Errors = new Dictionary<string, string>(); 
            Errors.Add(key, message);
        }
        public ServiceException(Exception ex)
            : base("Service Exception", ex)
        {
            Errors = new Dictionary<string, string>();
        }
    }

The error message then caught in my controller:

catch (Exception e) { log(e); }

Finally handled in the log method:

protected void log(Exception ex)
        {
            if (ex is ServiceException)
            {
                ModelState.Merge(((ServiceException)ex).Errors);  
            } else {
                Trace.Write(ex);
                ModelState.AddModelError("", "Database access error: " + ex.Message);
            }
        }

Can anyone comment if this is a good or bad method. I had a previous comment before about catching inner exceptions. Is this possible and if so then how can I catch and retain that inner exception detail.

Update 1

I modified the exception class so there's a constructor that takes ex. Not sure if this ideal but I think it works. Any more suggestions on how to improve would be appreciated.

Update 2

The code below fails with a message saying that

Error   2   Property or indexer 'System.Exception.InnerException' cannot be assigned to -- it is read only

I'm not sure how to fix this.

public class ServiceException : ApplicationException {

    public Dictionary<string, string> Errors { get; set; }
    public ServiceException() : this(null) {}
    public ServiceException(Exception ex, string key, string message)
    {
        Errors = new Dictionary<string, string>();
        InnerException = ex;
        Errors.Add(key, message);
    }
    public ServiceException(string key, string message)
    {
        Errors = new Dictionary<string, string>(); 
        Errors.Add(key, message);
    }
    public ServiceException(Exception ex)
        : base("Service Exception", ex)
    {
        Errors = new Dictionary<string, string>();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Please see the answer. I have revised it. –  P.K Dec 24 '11 at 6:32
    

2 Answers 2

In almost all cases, you should not catch exceptions at all.

You should only catch exceptions you can actually do something about.

Please see the many excellent questions under the tag: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/tagged/exception-handling?sort=votes.

Also, be certain to read the Microsoft guidelines on this: "Design Guidelines for Exceptions".

share|improve this answer

First and foremost

Include the caught exception as an inner exception

So instead of

throw new ServiceException("", typeof(T).Name + rk + " data retrieval error");

You should set the inner exception. Change your constructor

public ServiceException(string key, string message, Exception innerException)
            :base(message, innerException)
        {
            Errors = new Dictionary<string, string>(); 
            Errors.Add(key, message);
        }

Now,

//form  your exception message
 var message = typeof(T).Name + rk + " data retrieval error";
//create service exception with the new overloaded constructor
 var exception  = new ServiceException("", typeof(T).Name + rk + " data retrieval error", message);
 throw exception;

This will retain your inner exception.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your advices. Could I pass the InnerException in as a constructor argument? –  Samantha J Dec 24 '11 at 3:46
1  
Yes you can!!!! –  Matthias Dec 24 '11 at 3:49
    
@Matthias - Thanks. I updated my code and hope that looks okay. –  Samantha J Dec 24 '11 at 4:07
    
@Matthias - Just tried compilation and I get an error message with your code: Error 2 Property or indexer 'System.Exception.InnerException' cannot be assigned to -- it is read only –  Samantha J Dec 24 '11 at 5:59
    
InnerException is a readonly property. You cannot set it. I had not ran the code and hence didn't realize it. I have now corrected the code. Please try it. –  P.K Dec 24 '11 at 6:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.