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I'm having a little trouble getting erlang to give me a unicode string.

Here's what works:

io:format("~ts~n", [<<226,132,162>>]).

ok

But instead of printing to the console, I want to assign it to a variable. So I thought:

T = lists:flatten(io_lib:format("~ts~n", [<<226,132,162>>])).
T.
[8482,10]

How can I get T in the io_lib example to contain the symbol so I can write it to a network stream?

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Your binary <<226,132,162>> is not a unicode string but a UTF-8 encoded unicode string. The list returned from io_lib:format/2 is a list of unicode code points. – rvirding Dec 26 '11 at 14:29
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Instead of assigning the flattened version to a variable for sending on the network, can you instead re-write your code that sends over the network to accept the binary in the first place and use the formatted write mechanism ~ts when sending over the socket?

That would also let you avoid the lists:flatten, which isn't needed for the built-in IO mechanisms.

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I like it, it's possible, but a much more involved rewrite than I was planning. Is that the only option? – marcc Dec 24 '11 at 4:48
    
I can't say if it is the only option or not; hopefully someone with more experience in Erlang will know if there are options better suited to your case are possible. – sarnold Dec 24 '11 at 4:53
3  
First thing is knowing what you need to do. You can only send bytes over the network, so things like unicode strings, that are composed of codepoints that could be greater than 255 need to be encoded by the sending side and decoded by the receiving side. UTF-8 is the most used encoding for unicode strings, and that's what you get out of the io_lib call. A very reasonable way to send unicode strings over the network is encoding them in UTF8. Don't use io_lib:format for that, though. unicode:characters_to_binary/1 is the function meant to transform unicode strings in utf-8 encoded binaries – Samuel Rivas Dec 29 '11 at 6:42
    
@Samuel: That sounds like an excellent answer, you should give it as one so I can give you the +1 :) – sarnold Dec 29 '11 at 6:43
    
@sarnold Thanks, I added it as an answer for completeness, but there are already two good answers – Samuel Rivas Dec 29 '11 at 14:18

It does contain the trademark symbol: as you can see here, 8482 is its code. It isn't printed as ™ in the shell, because the shell prints as strings only lists which contain printable character code in Latin-1. So [8482, 10] is a Unicode string (in UTF-32 encoding). If you want to convert it to a different encoding, use the unicode module.

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First thing is knowing what you need to do. Then you can adapt your code the best way you find.

Erlang represents unicode strings as lists of codepoints. Unicode codepoints are integers, not bytes. Snce you can only send bytes over the network, things like unicode strings, need to be encoded in byte squences by the sending side and decoded by the receiving side. UTF-8 is the most used encoding for unicode strings, and that's what your binary is, the UTF-8 encoding of the unicode string composed by the codepoint 8482.

What you get out of the io_lib:format call is the erlang string representation of that codepoint plus the new line character.

A very reasonable way to send unicode strings over the network is encoding them in UTF-8. Don't use io_lib:format for that, though. unicode:characters_to_binary/1 is the function meant to transform unicode strings in UTF-8 encoded binaries.

In the receiving side (and probably even better in your whole application) you'll have to decide how you will handle the strings, either in encoded binaries (or lists) or in plain unicode lists. But over the network the only choice is using binaries (or iolists wich are possibly deep lists of bytes) and I'll bet the most reasonable encoding for your application will be UTF-8.

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