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C:\Users\Nick\Desktop\turntablefm\Bots\Super Bot>node bot.js

node.js:201
        throw e; // process.nextTick error, or 'error' event on first tick
              ^
Error: Cannot find module 'mongoose'
    at Function._resolveFilename (module.js:334:11)
    at Function._load (module.js:279:25)
    at Module.require (module.js:357:17)
    at require (module.js:368:17)
    at Object.<anonymous> (C:\Users\Nick\Desktop\turntablefm\Bots\Super Bot\db.j
s:1:78)
    at Module._compile (module.js:432:26)
    at Object..js (module.js:450:10)
    at Module.load (module.js:351:31)
    at Function._load (module.js:310:12)
    at Module.require (module.js:357:17)

I already installed it using npm install and i trie re installing but that didnt work any ideas? Thanks in advance.

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feel free to mark the answer if it has helped you. Cheers – Gabbar Singh May 2 '12 at 9:54

trying installing using this command :

npm install mongoose

do not use the -g switch.

BTW: I ran command prompt in admin mode.

http://prazjain.wordpress.com/2012/04/24/node-js-error-error-cannot-find-module-xyz/

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Why would -g make this not work? – Rafael Cosman Jun 25 '14 at 1:55
    
From the doc: In general, the rule of thumb is: If you’re installing something that you want to use in your program, using require('whatever'), then install it locally, at the root of your project. If you’re installing something that you want to use in your shell, on the command line or something, install it globally, so that its binaries end up in your PATH environment variable. – XiaoPeng Jun 4 '15 at 10:43

I got the same problem in my Mac and did a search in spotlight and found that mongoose is installed in /usr/local/node_modules (when I ran 'npm install mongoose'). Moving the mongoose folder to ~(home) node_modules where npm is supposted to actually install fixed my issue.

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Yup - same here. I npm installed it to Users/Name on my Windows box and was getting this error. When I moved node_modules up a few directories it worked just fine. – matt swan Mar 29 '13 at 15:19

You have to call in the command line

npm install mongoose

remember to call this command from the root path of your project

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in the directory housing bot.js, is there a node_modules folder that has a mongoose folder in it? Is your mongodb server running?

You can test it also by being in the project's root directory, calling node (no args, to open the REPL), and trying to require mongoose there.

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no there isnt but there is a node_modules folder with mongoose in it is it in the wrong spot? on my other computer at my apartment its working fine and its all the same execpt on this computer its getting this error – Nick Goad Dec 24 '11 at 7:55
    
If you're sure it's exactly the same, then make sure that mongodb is installed properly and running on the machine that's having the problem. – Paul Dec 24 '11 at 20:19

You are using windows operation system which mongoose doesn't support. It is apparent from this error message:

C:\>npm install mongoose
npm http GET https://registry.npmjs.org/mongoose/2.5.10
npm http 304 https://registry.npmjs.org/mongoose/2.5.10
npm http GET https://registry.npmjs.org/hooks/0.2.0
npm http GET https://registry.npmjs.org/mongodb/0.9.9-4
npm http 304 https://registry.npmjs.org/mongodb/0.9.9-4
npm http 304 https://registry.npmjs.org/hooks/0.2.0
npm WARN package.json mongodb@0.9.9-4 No README.md file found!
npm ERR! notsup Unsupported
npm ERR! notsup Not compatible with your operating system or architecture: mongo
db@0.9.9-4
npm ERR! notsup Valid OS:    linux,darwin,freebsd
npm ERR! notsup Valid Arch:  any
npm ERR! notsup Actual OS:   win32
npm ERR! notsup Actual Arch: x64

npm ERR! System Windows_NT 6.1.7601
npm ERR! command "C:\\Program Files\\nodejs\\\\node.exe" "C:\\Program Files\\nod
ejs\\node_modules\\npm\\bin\\npm-cli.js" "install" "mongoose"
npm ERR! cwd C:\
npm ERR! node -v v0.8.18
npm ERR! npm -v 1.2.2
npm ERR! code EBADPLATFORM
npm ERR!
npm ERR! Additional logging details can be found in:
npm ERR!     C:\npm-debug.log
npm ERR! not ok code 0
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on windows if you do

npm install mongoose

it will install it by default on your C:\ Drive

and if you try to run some *.js file from say D:\ drive

it will give you same error.

so i guess the installation directory and the *.js file should have same root.

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npm install creates "node_modules" in the pwd(present working directory)

as your application grows, the number of required modules grow and the better approach is to maintain a package.json (reference: http://stackoverflow.com/a/14226133/832147 ) and then issue just "npm install" instead of installing each.

As an extension when deploying your app on platforms like Heroku, you can ignore (git ignore) your huge node_modules directory of your project. Heroku installs your dependent modules by reading your package.json

this approach makes us create the same required node modules for each of our node based projects but it is okay as we need to issue the "npm install" command only once per project

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From the doc/blog

In general, the rule of thumb is:

If you’re installing something that you want to use in your program, using require('whatever'), then install it locally, at the root of your project.

If you’re installing something that you want to use in your shell, on the command line or something, install it globally, so that its binaries end up in your PATH environment variable.

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Install with the --save option:

npm install mongoose --save

This adds mongoose it to package.json which Heroku uses to build your app.

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