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Does PHP have existing functionality for irregular step ranges, is there a common solution to provide this functionality, or how can the following function be optimized?

The first function is the function I am concerned about. The second function is a real world use case that generates an array to populate values for a function that outputs a select dropdown for HTML.

<?php

function range_multistep($min, $max, Array $steps, $jmp = 10) {
    $steps = array_unique($steps);
    sort($steps, SORT_NUMERIC);

    $bigstep = ($jmp > 0) ? $jmp : $jmp * -1;

    $e = ($min > 0) ? floor(log($min, $bigstep)) : 0;
    for (; ; $e++) {
        foreach ($steps as $step) {
            $jump = pow($bigstep, $e);
            $num = $step * $jump;
            if ($num > $max) {
                break 2;
            } elseif ($num >= $min) {
                $arr[] = $num;
            }
        }
    }

    $arr = array_unique($arr);
    sort($arr, SORT_NUMERIC);

    return $arr;
}

function prices() {
    $price_steps = range_multistep(50, 100000, array(5, 10, 25));

    $prev_step = 0;
    foreach ($price_steps as $price) {
        $price_str = '$' . $prev_step . ' - $' . ($price - 1);
        $price_arr[] = $price_str;
        $prev_step = $price;
    }
    $price_arr[] = '$' . end($price_steps) . "+";

    return $price_arr;
}

print_r(prices());

The result of the previous:

Array
(
    [0] => $0 - $49
    [1] => $50 - $99
    [2] => $100 - $249
    [3] => $250 - $499
    [4] => $500 - $999
    [5] => $1000 - $2499
    [6] => $2500 - $4999
    [7] => $5000 - $9999
    [8] => $10000 - $24999
    [9] => $25000 - $49999
    [10] => $50000 - $99999
    [11] => $100000+
)
share|improve this question
    
One thing to ponder, would it be better to generate a range based on min/max and run that array through a foreach over a while/for? –  Steve Buzonas Dec 29 '11 at 10:31
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

The $e incrementor in the for loop is more of a while(1) endless loop.

So instead misusing the incrementor in pow(), do the pow on your own by just multiplying once per iteration. Calling pow() can be pretty expensive, so doing the pow calculation your own would better distribute the multiplication onto each iteration.

Edit: The following is a variant of your function that distributes the pow() calculation over the iteration. Additionally it does more proper variable initialisation (the return value was not set for example), gives notice if $min and $max are swapped and corrects that, uses abs instead of your ternary, throws an exception if an invalid value was given for log(), renamed some variables and add $num to the return value as key first to spare the array_unique operation at the end:

/**
 * @param int $min
 * @param int $max
 * @param array $steps
 * @param int $jmp
 * @return array range
 */
function range_multistep($min, $max, Array $steps, $jmp = 10) {
    $range = array();
    if (!$steps) return $range;

    if ($min < $max) {
       trigger_error(__FUNCTION__.'(): Minima and Maxima mal-aligned.', E_USER_NOTICE);
       list($max, $min) = array($min, $max);
    }

    $steps = array_unique($steps);
    sort($steps, SORT_NUMERIC);

    $bigstep = abs($jmp);
    if ($bigstep === 0) {
        throw new InvalidArgumentException(sprintf('Value %d is invalid for jmp', $jmp));
    }

    $initExponent = ($min > 0) ? floor(log($min, $bigstep)) : 0;

    for ($multiplier = pow($bigstep, $initExponent); ; $multiplier *= $bigstep) {
        foreach ($steps as $step) {
            $num = $step * $multiplier;
            if ($num  > $max) {
                break 2;
            } elseif ($num >= $min) {
                $range[$num] = 1;
            }
        }
    }

    $range = array_keys($range);
    sort($range, SORT_NUMERIC);

    return $range;
}

In case you feel experimental, it's also possible to turn the two loops (for+foreach) into one, but the readability of the code does not benefit from it:

for(
    $multiplier = pow($bigstep, $initExponent),
    $step = reset($steps)
        ;
    $num = $step * $multiplier,
    $num <= $max
        ;
    # infinite array iterator:
    ($step=next($steps))?:
    (
      $step=reset($steps)
      # with reset expression:
      AND $multiplier *= $bigstep
    )
){
    if ($num >= $min)
        $range[$num] = 1;
}

I think if you take care to not re-use variables (like the function parameter) and give them better to read names, improvement comes on it's own.

share|improve this answer
    
$jmp and $jump are two confusing, yet separate variables. Is $min != min($min, $max) better than $min < $max? If so, why? –  Steve Buzonas Dec 29 '11 at 21:50
    
Not really ;), now as you ask, I would choose $min < $max ;) - I did that part quickly at the end and was trying something else as well so just an artefact. I fully removed $jump as well, will check the wording of the answer, that's a mistake of mine. –  hakre Dec 29 '11 at 22:08
    
Also, the typecast Array in the parameters, would that not trigger an error or give us an array which would make us never execute code behind if (!$steps). Maybe if (empty($steps)) would be more suitable. –  Steve Buzonas Dec 29 '11 at 23:07
    
It's not a typecast it's just a type hint. PHP will thrown an exception if you pass anything else than an array to the function for that parameter. Next to that if it is empty, it is FALSE, so !$steps is just a short version for empty array in this case (array with no elements is boolean FALSE in PHP). It will return an empty range then which is the same as in the original function but just as a short-cut (early exit). –  hakre Dec 29 '11 at 23:11
    
It's not boolean false, that's what raised my concern. It is a falsy value though, I kind of expected an empty array to be true for some reason. I guess it's because it's relatively different than the gist behind 0, "", null, and false. –  Steve Buzonas Dec 31 '11 at 8:04
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Repeated addition is best replaced by multiplication, and repeated multiplication is best replaced by raising to powers -- which you've done.

I see nothing here that requires improvement assuming you don't need "bulletproof" behavior in the face of $jmp = 1 or $min >= $max badly-behaved inputs.

share|improve this answer
    
bulletproof isn't necessary, but it would be nice to make it feel complete. –  Steve Buzonas Dec 27 '11 at 13:56
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