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I am serializing an structure into a MemoryStream and I want to save and load the serialized structure.

So, How to Save a MemoryStream into a file and also load it back from file?

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If you need to save to a file, why are you using a MemoryStream? –  Oded Dec 24 '11 at 10:58
    
@Oded What should I use? Can you give me an example? –  Mahdi Ghiasi Dec 24 '11 at 10:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 94 down vote accepted

You may use MemoryStream.WriteTo or Stream.CopyTo (supported in framework version 4.5.2, 4.5.1, 4.5, 4) methods to write content of memory stream to another stream.

memoryStream.WriteTo(fileStream);

Update:

fileStream.CopyTo(memoryStream);
memoryStream.CopyTo(fileStream);
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2  
Why is this not the best answer?! –  Fiona Taylor Gorringe May 8 at 10:40
1  
Thanks for the update. –  Mahdi Ghiasi Jul 2 at 10:29
    
memoryStream.CopyTo didn't seem to work for me, while WriteTo did. I think perhaps it was because my memoryStream.Position wasn't 0 –  Mark Adamson Jul 9 at 14:16

Assuming that MemoryStream name is ms.

This code writes down MemoryStream to a file:

using (FileStream file = new FileStream("file.bin", FileMode.Create, System.IO.FileAccess.Write)) {
   byte[] bytes = new byte[ms.Length];
   ms.Read(bytes, 0, (int)ms.Length);
   file.Write(bytes, 0, bytes.Length);
   ms.Close();
}

and this reads a file to a MemoryStream :

using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
using (FileStream file = new FileStream("file.bin", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read)) {
   byte[] bytes = new byte[file.Length];
   file.Read(bytes, 0, (int)file.Length);
   ms.Write(bytes, 0, (int)file.Length);
}
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1  
Can I ask why you use FileMode.Create in the read sample vs FileMode.Open? –  Philter Feb 14 '13 at 17:58
3  
In the first code block, instead of manually copying memory stream to array, you can use built-in ms.ToArray() function. –  Gman Mar 25 '13 at 12:36
2  
It's important to set ms.Position = 0, otherwise byte array (and file) will contain all zeros. –  Gregory Khrapunovich Nov 4 '13 at 21:01

The combined answer for writing to a file can be;

MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();    
FileStream file = new FileStream("file.bin", FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write);
ms.WriteTo(file);
file.Close();
ms.Close();
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The stream should really by disposed of even if there's an exception (quite likely on file I/O) - using clauses are my favourite approach for this, so for writing your MemoryStream, you can use:

using (FileStream file = new FileStream("file.bin", FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write)) {
    memoryStream.WriteTo(file);
}

And for reading it back:

using (FileStream file = new FileStream("file.bin", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read)) {
    byte[] bytes = new byte[file.Length];
    file.Read(bytes, 0, (int)file.Length);
    ms.Write(bytes, 0, (int)file.Length);
}

If the files are large, then it's worth noting that the reading operation will use twice as much memory as the total file size. One solution to that is to create the MemoryStream from the byte array - the following code assumes you won't then write to that stream.

MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(bytes, writable: false);

My research (below) shows that the internal buffer is the same byte array as you pass it, so it should save memory.

byte[] testData = new byte[] { 104, 105, 121, 97 };
var ms = new MemoryStream(testData, 0, 4, false, true);
Assert.AreSame(testData, ms.GetBuffer());
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best answer here –  Zar Shardan May 21 '13 at 1:15

For loading a file, I like this a lot better

MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
using (FileStream fs = File.OpenRead(file))
{
    fs.CopyTo(ms);
}
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If file is opened in Microsoft Word - is there a way for creating a memory stream from that file? I am receiving an error 'file is opened by another process' –  FrenkyB Dec 21 '13 at 6:17

protected by AVD Apr 10 '13 at 5:41

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