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I am a python newbie trying to achieve the following:

I have a list of lists:

lst = [[567,345,234],[253,465,756, 2345],[333,777,111, 555]]

I want map lst into another list containing only the second smallest number from each sublist. So the result should be:

[345, 465, 333]

For example if I were just interested in the smallest number, I could do:

map(lambda x: min(x),lst)

I wish I could do this:

map(lambda x: sort(x)[1],lst)

but sort does not chain. (returns None)

neither is something like this allowed:

map(lambda x: sort(x); x[1],lst) #hence the multiple statement question

Is there a way to do this with map in python but without defining a named function? (it is easy with anonymous blocks in ruby, for example)

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7 Answers 7

up vote 38 down vote accepted

There are several different answers I can give here, from your specific question to more general concerns. so from most specific to most general:

Q. Can you put multiple statements in a lambda?

A. No. But you don't actually need to use a lambda. You can put the statements in a def instead. ie:

def second_lowest(l):
    l.sort()
    return l[1]

map(second_lowest, lst)

Q. Can you get the second lowest item from a lambda by sorting the list?

A. Yes. As alex's answer poinst out, sorted() is a version of sort that creates a new list, rather than sorting in-place, and can be chained. Note that this is probably what you should be using - it's bad practice for your map to have side effects on the original list.

Q. How should I get the second lowest item from each list in a sequence of lists.

A. sorted(l)[1] is not actually the best way for this. It has O(N log(N)) complexity, while an O(n) solution exists. This can be found in the heapq module.

>>> import  heapq
>>> l = [5,2,6,8,3,5]
>>> heapq.nsmallest(l, 2)
[2, 3]

So just use:

map(lambda x: heapq.nsmallest(x,2)[1],  list_of_lists)

It's also usually considered clearer to use a list comprehension, which avoids the lambda altogether:

[heapq.nsmallest(x,2)[1] for x in list_of_lists]
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5  
+1: You don't need a lambda. –  S.Lott May 14 '09 at 10:13
2  
I don't think you're right about the O(n) solution being found in the heapq module. All you're doing there is heap sorting the list, which is O(n log n) and then finding the smallest elements. –  avpx Dec 3 '12 at 20:52
3  
The documentation (docs.python.org/2/library/heapq.html#heapq.nsmallest) does indeed warn that using heapq.nsmallest() may be less efficient than just using sorted(), so only measurements can tell which solution is fastest in your case. heapq.nsmallest() does however have a complexity of O(k * log(n) + n) I think, with n the length of the list and k the number of smallest items you wish to extract. O(n) to heapify the list and k times O(log(n)) to pop k items. This is better than O(n * log(n)), especially for small k. –  Vortexfive Apr 26 '13 at 13:26
    
@Vortexfive and for constant k (as here with 'second lowest') O(k*log(n)+n) simplifies to O(n) –  Duncan Sep 9 '13 at 11:09
    
You technically don't need a lambda for one-liners either, but it's certainly more convenient. Hopefully better lambda support gets added later on. –  James Apr 8 at 2:14
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Use sorted function, like this:

map(lambda x: sorted(x)[1],lst)
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ah.Thanks.(what a descriptive name for the function!) Still curious about the multiple statement within lambda part. Possible? –  bagheera May 14 '09 at 9:44
1  
Nope, "functions created with lambda forms cannot contain statements". docs.python.org/reference/expressions.html#lambda –  alex vasi May 14 '09 at 9:46
    
-1: lambda and map instead of list comprehensions? Not very pythonic. –  nikow May 14 '09 at 9:56
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Or if you want to avoid lambda and have a generator instead of a list:

(sorted(col)[1] for col in lst)

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Using begin() from here: http://www.reddit.com/r/Python/comments/hms4z/ask_pyreddit_if_you_were_making_your_own/c1wycci

Python 3.2 (r32:88445, Mar 25 2011, 19:28:28) 
[GCC 4.5.2] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> lst = [[567,345,234],[253,465,756, 2345],[333,777,111, 555]]
>>> begin = lambda *args: args[-1]
>>> list(map(lambda x: begin(x.sort(), x[1]), lst))
[345, 465, 333]
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Time traveler here. If you generally want to have multiple statements within a lambda, you can pass other lambdas as arguments to that lambda.

(lambda x, f: list((y[1] for y in f(x))))(lst, lambda x: (sorted(y) for y in x))

You can't actually have multiple statements, but you can simulate that by passing lambdas to lambdas.

Edit: The time traveler returns! You can also abuse the behavior of boolean expressions (keeping in mind short-circuiting rules and truthiness) to chain operations. Using the ternary operator gives you even more power. Again, you can't have multiple statements, but you can of course have many function calls. This example does some arbitrary junk with a bunch of data, but, it shows that you can do some funny stuff. The print statements are examples of functions which return None (as does the .sort() method) but they also help show what the lambda is doing.

>>> (lambda x: print(x) or x+1)(10)
10
11
>>> f = (lambda x: x[::2] if print(x) or x.sort() else print(enumerate(x[::-1]) if print(x) else filter(lambda (i, y): print((i, y)) or (i % 3 and y % 2), enumerate(x[::-1]))))
>>> from random import shuffle
>>> l = list(range(100))
>>> shuffle(l)
>>> f(l)
[84, 58, 7, 99, 17, 14, 60, 35, 12, 56, 26, 48, 55, 40, 28, 52, 31, 39, 43, 96, 64, 63, 54, 37, 79, 25, 46, 72, 10, 59, 24, 68, 23, 13, 34, 41, 94, 29, 62, 2, 50, 32, 11, 97, 98, 3, 70, 93, 1, 36, 87, 47, 20, 73, 45, 0, 65, 57, 6, 76, 16, 85, 95, 61, 4, 77, 21, 81, 82, 30, 53, 51, 42, 67, 74, 8, 15, 83, 5, 9, 78, 66, 44, 27, 19, 91, 90, 18, 49, 86, 22, 75, 71, 88, 92, 33, 89, 69, 80, 38]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99]
(0, 99)
(1, 98)
(2, 97)
(3, 96)
(4, 95)
(5, 94)
(6, 93)
(7, 92)
(8, 91)
(9, 90)
(10, 89)
(11, 88)
(12, 87)
(13, 86)
(14, 85)
(15, 84)
(16, 83)
(17, 82)
(18, 81)
(19, 80)
(20, 79)
(21, 78)
(22, 77)
(23, 76)
(24, 75)
(25, 74)
(26, 73)
(27, 72)
(28, 71)
(29, 70)
(30, 69)
(31, 68)
(32, 67)
(33, 66)
(34, 65)
(35, 64)
(36, 63)
(37, 62)
(38, 61)
(39, 60)
(40, 59)
(41, 58)
(42, 57)
(43, 56)
(44, 55)
(45, 54)
(46, 53)
(47, 52)
(48, 51)
(49, 50)
(50, 49)
(51, 48)
(52, 47)
(53, 46)
(54, 45)
(55, 44)
(56, 43)
(57, 42)
(58, 41)
(59, 40)
(60, 39)
(61, 38)
(62, 37)
(63, 36)
(64, 35)
(65, 34)
(66, 33)
(67, 32)
(68, 31)
(69, 30)
(70, 29)
(71, 28)
(72, 27)
(73, 26)
(74, 25)
(75, 24)
(76, 23)
(77, 22)
(78, 21)
(79, 20)
(80, 19)
(81, 18)
(82, 17)
(83, 16)
(84, 15)
(85, 14)
(86, 13)
(87, 12)
(88, 11)
(89, 10)
(90, 9)
(91, 8)
(92, 7)
(93, 6)
(94, 5)
(95, 4)
(96, 3)
(97, 2)
(98, 1)
(99, 0)
[(2, 97), (4, 95), (8, 91), (10, 89), (14, 85), (16, 83), (20, 79), (22, 77), (26, 73), (28, 71), (32, 67), (34, 65), (38, 61), (40, 59), (44, 55), (46, 53), (50, 49), (52, 47), (56, 43), (58, 41), (62, 37), (64, 35), (68, 31), (70, 29), (74, 25), (76, 23), (80, 19), (82, 17), (86, 13), (88, 11), (92, 7), (94, 5), (98, 1)]
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Putting the statements in a list may simulate multiple statements:

E.g.:

lambda x: [f1(x), f2(x), f3(x), x+1]
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Thanks! That helped me. Maybe for some it is helpful to show how it works: pastebin.com/JNquX1Kh –  Frank Zalkow Nov 7 '13 at 15:47
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You can do it in O(n) time using min and index instead of using sort or heapq.

First create new list of everything except the min value of the original list:

new_list = lst[:lst.index(min(lst))] + lst[lst.index(min(lst))+1:]

Then take the min value of the new list:

second_smallest = min(new_list)

Now all together in a single lambda:

map(lambda x: min(x[:x.index(min(x))] + x[x.index(min(x))+1:]), lst)

Yes it is really ugly, but it should be algorithmically cheap. Also since some folks in this thread want to see list comprehensions:

[min(x[:x.index(min(x))] + x[x.index(min(x))+1:]) for x in lst]
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