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I am making one library which I hope so is going to be used at many places.

In my interface I have a method which triggers events. I have cached myself that forget to subscribe to the events and get error after program has compiled. I would love to try to push users to subscribe to the events so that they get compiler errors before a program starts if there is no subscription to the events.

Is that possible at all? Or is HELP and XML comments just enough to mention a user to subscribe to an event.

My interface looks like:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using Robot.SkolaCa.BusinessObjects;

namespace Robot.SkolaCa.FiskalPrinter
{
    public delegate void OnRacunSuccessEvent(object sender, OnRacunSuccessArgs eargs);
    public delegate void OnRacunErrorEvent(object sender, OnRacunErrorArgs eargs);
    public class OnRacunErrorArgs : EventArgs
    {
        public string ErrorMessage { get; set; }
    }
    public class OnRacunSuccessArgs : EventArgs
    {   
        public string SuccesMessage { get; set; }
    }

    public interface IFiskalPrinter
    {
        bool PresjekStanja();
        bool DnevniIzvjestaj();
        /// <summary>
        /// PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO ALL EVENTS !!!!
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="racun"></param>
        void Racun(Racun racun);
        bool StornpRacuna(Racun racun, int brojFiskalnogKojiSeStornira);
        void SetConfig(IPrinterConfig config);
        event OnRacunSuccessEvent OnRacunSuccess;
        event OnRacunErrorEvent OnRacunError;
    }
}
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1  
That is impossible. Subscription of events is matter of choice. –  AVD Dec 24 '11 at 12:40
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Events by definition are facultative, i.e. if one wants, he/she subscribes, if not - then it's his/her right. By declaring an event, you say 'If someone is interested, I will notify him about some event'. Therefore, the whole idea of forcing subscriptions is wrong.

But if you need to force consumers do something, you'd better declared a co-interface for your class consumers and make your methods receive interface implementations as arguments. For example:

public interface IFiskalPrinterConsumer
{
    void OnRacunSuccess(string successMessage);
    void OnRacunError(string errorMessage);
}

public interface IFiskalPrinter
{
    bool PresjekStanja();
    bool DnevniIzvjestaj();
    void Racun(Racun racun, IFiskalPrinterConsumer consumer);
    bool StornpRacuna(Racun racun, int brojFiskalnogKojiSeStornira);
    void SetConfig(IPrinterConfig config);
}

This way you'll be able to throw run-time errors if the caller passes null as consumer, and the caller won't be able to not subscribe. This will make your contract more clear. You're now saying 'I'm not going to work if you won't give me a listener object'.

Then you might create, say, Code Analysis or FxCop rules to check that noone implements the interface with empty method implementations.

And so on...

But the joke is: if someone wants to break your rules, he will.

UPDATE

The co-interface solution might be even better, because with event you can have not only 0 subscribers, but also 1000 subscribers. How about writing XML comments saying 'please, verify that you always have exactly one subscription'? You know, that's quite difficult to verify.

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Well, you can kind of "force" the user to subscribe to the event (if for example this is a single event, or small quantity, that must be subscribed)

  1. You can make a private default constructor
  2. You can create a single constructor that like a parameter(s) accepts a delegates that you will add to your events.
  3. If the user of your class passes a null instead of delegate, you can raise an exception, so you will get runtime exception and not compile time.

In this case a user of your class will no have other way then just pass a delegate. Kind of your type architectural constrain.

EDIT

There is another solution, imo, that could be applied in this case, is use of Aspect Orientated Programming (I never made it for this issue before, so this is just advise too look at). If you mark your class with attribute and during compilation your aspect checking code will determine that no delegate was passed, can generate a compile time error.

But, as I said, I never did it for this kind of issue, so you need to check it by yourself.

Hope this helps.

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1  
Yeah, AOP might help inside a single project. But if we consider a library's public interface, annotating the library with words like 'to use this, you MUST use the XXXX AOP toolset' would cross that library out of my consideration by default. Well, maybe if it produced gold eggs... –  Pavel Gatilov Dec 24 '11 at 13:03
    
@PavelGatilov: agree, this is an architectural decision. –  Tigran Dec 24 '11 at 13:05
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You can't force it programatically, i.e. you cannot produce compile error. If this was an abstract class you can do things like override Dispose or check event callers for existing references or even clear your handlers, but for interfaces there's very little you can do.

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