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Say you have a txt file, what is the command to view the top 10 lines and bottom 10 lines of file simultaneously?

i.e. if the file is 200 lines long, then view lines 1-10 and 190-200 in one go.

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What do you mean "in one go" ? –  cnicutar Dec 24 '11 at 13:02
    
In one command maybe? –  Paul Dec 24 '11 at 13:04
    
@cnicutar ie. not going head -10 file looking at the data and then separately going tail -10 file and looking at the data –  toop Dec 24 '11 at 13:04

10 Answers 10

up vote 59 down vote accepted

You can simply:

(head; tail) < file.txt
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5  
+1 never realized such syntax was possible –  awesomo Dec 24 '11 at 17:34
12  
Strictly speaking, this doesn't give you the tail of the original file, but the tail of the stream after head has consumed the first 10 lines of the file. (Compare this with head < file.txt; tail < file.txt on a file with fewer than 20 lines). Just a very minor point to keep in mind. (But still +1.) –  chepner Mar 30 '12 at 17:20
5  
Nice. If you want a gap between the head and tail parts: (head;echo;tail) < file.txt –  Simon Hibbs May 23 '12 at 11:02
1  
Curious about why/how this works. Asked it as a new question: stackoverflow.com/questions/13718242 –  zellyn Dec 5 '12 at 7:24
    
@chepner: { tee >(head >&2) | tail; } 2>&1 < file.txt instead of { head; tail; } < file.txt supports overlapping lines if you need it. {} instead of () are to avoid creating a subshell. –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 5 '13 at 0:13

ed is the standard text editor

$ echo -e '1+10,$-10d\n%p' | ed -s file.txt
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2  
What if the file has more or less than 200 lines? And you don't know the number of lines ab initio? –  Paul Dec 24 '11 at 13:07
    
@Paul I've changed sed to ed –  kev Dec 24 '11 at 13:34
2  
+1 for using ed. –  Tom Anderson Dec 24 '11 at 14:44

head -10 file.txt; tail -10 file.txt

Other than that, you'll need to write your own program / script.

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Nice, I have always used cat and head or tail piped, good to know that I can use them individually! –  Paul Dec 24 '11 at 13:09
    
How can I then pipe these first 10+last 10 into another command? –  toop Dec 24 '11 at 13:12
    
head file.txt; tail file.txt | your_program –  Paul Dec 24 '11 at 13:15
    
@Paul - with 'your_program' as wc -l it returns 10 instead of 20 –  toop Dec 24 '11 at 13:18
2  
or, without having to spawn a subshell: { head file; tail file; } | prog (spacing inside the braces, and the trailing semicolon are required) –  glenn jackman Dec 24 '11 at 19:25

Well, you can always chain them together. Like so, head fiename_foo && tail filename_foo. If that is not sufficient, you could write yourself a bash function in your .profile file or any login file that you use:

head_and_tail() {
    head $1 && tail $1
}

And, later invoke it from your shell prompt: head_and_tail filename_foo.

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First 10 lines of file.ext, then its last 10 lines:

cat file.ext | head -10 && cat file.ext | tail -10

Last 10 lines of the file, then the first 10:

cat file.ext | tail -10 && cat file.ext | head -10

You can then pipe the output elsewhere too:

(cat file.ext | head -10 && cat file.ext | tail -10 ) | your_program

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That's not "one go", but yeah, I guess that's the better way to do this.. –  redShadow Dec 24 '11 at 13:04
3  
Why use cat when you can just call head -10 file.txt? –  jstarek Dec 24 '11 at 14:52
    
Can you make the number of lines variable, so the call is something like: head_ tail(foo, m,n) - returning the first m snd last n lines of text? –  ricardo Jul 22 '12 at 20:02
    
@ricardo that would involve writing a bash script that takes 3 args and passes them to tail and head or a function by alias-ing it. –  Paul Jul 23 '12 at 10:19

the problem here is that stream-oriented programs don't know the length of the file in advance (because there might not be one, if it's a real stream).

tools like tail buffer the last n lines seen and wait for the end of the stream, then print.

if you want to do this in a single command (and have it work with any offset, and do not repeat lines if they overlap) you'll have to emulate this behaviour I mentioned.

try this awk:

awk -v offset=10 '{ if (NR <= offset) print; else { a[NR] = $0; delete a[NR-offset] } } END { for (i=NR-offset+1; i<=NR; i++) print a[i] }' yourfile
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it needs more work in order to avoid issues when offset is larger than the file –  Samus_ Dec 24 '11 at 13:37
    
Yay, this works with piped output, not just files: a.out | awk -v ... –  Camille Goudeseune Apr 22 '13 at 21:07
    
indeed :) but that's awk's normal behavior, most commandline programs work on stdin when invoked without arguments. –  Samus_ Apr 24 '13 at 0:05

For a pure stream (e.g. output from a command), you can use 'tee' to fork the stream and send one stream to head and one to tail. This requires using either the '>( list )' feature of bash (+ /dev/fd/N):

( COMMAND | tee /dev/fd/3 | head ) 3> >( tail )

or using /dev/fd/N (or /dev/stderr) plus subshells with complicated redirection:

( ( seq 1 100 | tee /dev/fd/2 | head 1>&3 ) 2>&1 | tail ) 3>&1
( ( seq 1 100 | tee /dev/stderr | head 1>&3 ) 2>&1 | tail ) 3>&1

(Neither of these will work in csh or tcsh.)

For something with a little better control, you can use this perl command:

COMMAND | perl -e 'my $size = 10; my @buf = (); while (<>) { print if $. <= $size; push(@buf, $_); if ( @buf > $size ) { shift(@buf); } } print "------\n"; print @buf;'
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+1 for stream support. You could reuse stderr: COMMAND | { tee >(head >&2) | tail; } |& other_commands –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 5 '13 at 0:07
    
btw, it breaks for files larger than the buffer size (8K on my system). cat >/dev/null fixes it: COMMAND | { tee >(head >&2; cat >/dev/null) | tail; } |& other_commands –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 5 '13 at 0:47

Why not to use sed for this task?

sed -n -e 1,+9p -e 190,+9p textfile.txt

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1  
This works for files of known length, but not files whose length is unknown. –  Kevin Nov 13 '12 at 2:39

To handle pipes (streams) as well as files, add this to your .bashrc or .profile file:

headtail() { awk -v offset="$1" '{ if (NR <= offset) print; else { a[NR] = $0; delete a[NR-offset] } } END { for (i=NR-offset+1; i<=NR; i++) print a[i] }' ; }

Then you can not only

headtail 10 < file.txt

but also

a.out | headtail 10

(This still appends spurious blank lines when 10 exceeds the input's length, unlike plain old a.out | (head; tail). Thank you, previous answerers.)

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I wrote a simple python app to do this: https://gist.github.com/garyvdm/9970522

It handles pipes (streams) as well as files.

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