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what's the difference between Browsers and Node? for instance:

setName.js on Node:

var setName;
setName = function (name) {
    return this.name = name;
};
setName("LuLu");
//LuLu
console.log(name);
//undefined
console.log(this.name);

setName.html in browser:

<script>
    var setName;
    setName = function (name) {
        return this.name = name;
    };
    setName("LuLu");
    //LuLu
    console.log(name);
    //LuLu
    console.log(this.name);
</script>

the the second log is different,why?

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it is really "undefined",my node version is v0.4.10 –  island205 Dec 24 '11 at 13:58
3  
(1) We try to avoid global variables in the browser. (2) You want to start writing strict-mode code, in which case the above code throws... –  Šime Vidas Dec 24 '11 at 14:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Node is a JavaScript engine, not a browser. The specific reason that you see undefined in Node, and Lulu in a browser? Differences in the global namespace:

In browsers, the top-level scope is the global scope. That means that in browsers if you're in the global scope var something will define a global variable. In Node this is different. The top-level scope is not the global scope; var something inside a Node module will be local to that module.

In the browser, this is a reference to the window object — the browser's global namespace — for all functions which are invoked unattached to an object (e.g. not like foo.bar()). In Node, this is simply not a reference to the global namespace.


N.B. console.log(this.name) in a Node interpreter will print Lulu, not undefined. That's because, in the REPL only,

> this === global
true

Further reading @ How To Node: What is "this?"


Okay, one more edit as prompted by @Šime Vidas' comment regarding this in ES5 strict mode:

  • In the global context (outside of any function), this refers to the global object, whether in strict mode or not.
  • When the this keyword occurs inside a function, its value depends on how the function is called.
  • When a function is called as a method of an object, its this is set to the object the method is called on.

More interesting reading courtesy of Juriy Zaytsev (aka @kangax) in one of his blog posts.

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3  
Consider making your answer more future-oriented by adding information about strict mode. (In function bodies, this is undefined unless explicitly set by the invocation method.) –  Šime Vidas Dec 24 '11 at 14:10
    
you are right,but in the REPL only! –  island205 Dec 24 '11 at 14:20
    
@Šime how's that? –  Matt Ball Dec 24 '11 at 17:11
    
@MДΓΓБДLL Neat :) –  Šime Vidas Dec 24 '11 at 17:35
    
i want to know why console.log this.name output undefined? –  island205 Dec 26 '11 at 5:53

Your browser code has the window host object. Node does not have that host object. When you set this.name, you are actually setting it to the window object aka making a global variable.

window.name === this.name // true

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