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I Created a wrapper for Ninject DI container which I intend to use in WPF application. I would like it to be thread safe in case I need to open new windows in separated threads, but I am confused about using volatile keyword and locking. As much as I'm aware of, locking is pretty much Straightforward to understand but I'm not shore about using volatile keyword. From my googling results I came to understanding that volatile keyword ensures safe read access for specified instance in multithreaded environment but doesn't provide any kind of safety when making changes in memory space occupied by the specified instance. I combined my solution with some examples of thread-safe singleton patterns and came up with this wrapper that would serve me as a service locator:

public class NinjectResolver
{
    private static object syncRoot = new object();
    private static volatile NinjectResolver instance = null;
    private static volatile IKernel kernel = null;

    public static NinjectResolver GetInstance()
    {
        lock (syncRoot)
        {
            if (instance == null)
                instance = new NinjectResolver();
        }
        return instance;
    }

    static NinjectResolver()
    {
        lock (syncRoot)
        {
            if (kernel == null)
                kernel = new StandardKernel();
        }
    }

    public void AddBindings(Dictionary<Type, Type> bindings)
    {
        lock (syncRoot)
        {
            foreach (var binding in bindings)
            {
                Type IType = binding.Key;
                Type ImplementationType = binding.Value;
                kernel.Bind(IType).To(ImplementationType);
            }
        }
    }

    private NinjectResolver()
    {
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Resolves All dependencies for requested instance and returns that instance
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">Requested Implementation type</typeparam>
    /// <returns>Instance of Implementation type</returns>
    public T Resolve<T>()
    {
        return kernel.TryGet<T>();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Resolves property injection dependencies in already instantiated Implementation types
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="obj">Specified instance of implementation type</param>
    public void Inject(object obj)
    {
        kernel.Inject(obj);
    }
}

My question is this: Do I need to use locking in specified places since initialization will take place inside App.xaml.cs (first call of GetInstance() ) and do these static fields need to be declared as volatile or I can omit that part since they are more or less readonly in this construction. I would appreciate if someone could shred some light on this.

share|improve this question
1  
You can omit volatile for reasons you already know. Locking is OK. Also, I giggled when I read "someone could shred some light", thinking if only Chuck Norris could read this :) –  Tomislav Markovski Dec 24 '11 at 14:26
    
Well, we all have our "special moments"... Thank you for your answer. –  Stanque Dec 24 '11 at 15:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To implement a thread-safe singleton pattern you have two options basically:

1.Double-checked locking

public static NinjectResolver GetInstance()
{   
    if(instance == null)
    {
        lock (syncRoot)
        {
            if (instance == null)
                instance = new NinjectResolver();
        }
    }
    return instance;
}

2.Initialize the instance upon declaration

private static volatile NinjectResolver instance = new NinjectResolver();

public static NinjectResolver GetInstance()
{
    return instance;
}

Also you can drop the code inside the static block and just use:

private static volatile IKernel kernel = new StandardKernel();
share|improve this answer
    
I didn't understand from your answer do I need to use both volatile keyword and locking? The second approach would be fine in my case but I presume it would be overhead in cases where expensive instances are optionally needed during application lifetime. Thank you for pointing me to double-check the instance when locking, I forgot that. –  Stanque Dec 24 '11 at 14:50
    
@Stanque: If you're going for lazy initialization with locks, then volatile is not needed, because locks introduce implicit memory fences. –  Tudor Dec 24 '11 at 14:55
    
Thanks for clarifying that. –  Stanque Dec 24 '11 at 15:16

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