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I have a class that I want to use to store "properties" for another class. These properties simply have a name and a value. Ideally, what I would like is to be able to add typed properties, so that the "value" returned is always of the type that I want it to be.

The type should always be a primitive. This class subclasses an abstract class which basically stores the name and value as string. The idea being that this subclass will add some type-safety to the base class (as well as saving me on some conversion).

So, I have created a class which is (roughly) this:

public class TypedProperty<DataType> : Property
{
    public DataType TypedValue
    {
        get { // Having problems here! }
        set { base.Value = value.ToString();}
    }
}

So the question is:

Is there a "generic" way to convert from string back to a primitive?

I can't seem to find any generic interface that links the conversion across the board (something like ITryParsable would have been ideal!).


Update 1:

Wow, lots of great answers, thank you to you all! I will work my way through the proposed solutions and see how they get on!

@Jon Limjap, @lubos hasko - I have TBH, I am not sure if this is really the best way for me to do this.. Thinking about it, the benefit I have from typing the property here will probly be outweighed during inspection of the properties later. Jon, I opted for string since it's the lowest common denominator (everything can be represented as a string easily).

@Greg Hewgill, Thanks for the link. As you say, not sure as to how to implement for C# (there probably is a way) but the link does look real useful (straight into delicious!) +1 for sharing, thank you.


Update 2:

@lubos hasko - You understood very well! Your code seems to work like a charm. I can access both the base .Value property (which returns the string) and the subclasses .TypedValue property which always returns the type specified in DataType - Very many thanks, answer accepted!

@Jon Limjap - Thanks for the suggestion, while this would have worked, the problem is that you would still lose the "hard" type of it (that is, bool, int, whatever) since the return type would become IConvertibleFromString which sadly won't tie in with my original goal.

@dbkk - I have not tried your solution since lubos' worked so well, however I did have concerns about the speed of it (due to reflection) although I am not sure on the actual impact of it. Thank you for the input though.

share|improve this question
    
I'd be interested in seeing an example of your concrete class, even just a snippet. :) –  Jon Limjap Aug 12 '08 at 9:54
    
can you please post the relevant parts of your base class? –  JJS Jul 11 '12 at 21:26

6 Answers 6

up vote 168 down vote accepted

I am not sure whether I understood your intentions correctly, but let's see if this one helps.

public class TypedProperty<T> : Property
{
    public T TypedValue
    {
        get { return (T)Convert.ChangeType(base.Value, typeof(T)); }
        set { base.Value = value.ToString();}
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've been wondering for a few days how to deserialize a stream into a generic type. Thanks :) –  Trap Sep 30 '08 at 22:13
6  
This only works if your type implements IConvertible –  Kilhoffer Jan 11 '10 at 14:46
3  
I agree, although Convert.ChangeType is not very universal and extensible solution, it works for most basic types. if something better is needed, it's no problem to wrap this method into something bigger like Tim suggested or use different conversion method altogether. –  lubos hasko Jan 11 '10 at 15:11
3  
I would definitely add the where T:IConvertible –  MikeT Nov 7 '13 at 10:45

lubos hasko's method fails for nullables. The method below will work for nullables. I didn't come up with it, though. I found it via Google: http://web.archive.org/web/20101214042641/http://dogaoztuzun.com/post/C-Generic-Type-Conversion.aspx Credit to "Tuna Toksoz"

Usage first:

TConverter.ChangeType<T>(StringValue);  

The class is below.

public static class TConverter
{
    public static T ChangeType<T>(object value)
    {
        return (T)ChangeType(typeof(T), value);
    }
    public static object ChangeType(Type t, object value)
    {
        TypeConverter tc = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(t);
        return tc.ConvertFrom(value);
    }
    public static void RegisterTypeConverter<T, TC>() where TC : TypeConverter
    {

        TypeDescriptor.AddAttributes(typeof(T), new TypeConverterAttribute(typeof(TC)));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
i would add a Fallback convert options for Enums and Other Complex structures, but good call. –  Tomer W Mar 27 '12 at 14:10
1  
Why the RegisterTypeConverter? Do we need to register the converters before hand? (unfortunately the link is dead, so I couldn't read up on it) –  Cohen Nov 30 '12 at 9:40
    
For multiple conversions you should probably create tc (the TypeConverter) one time only. TypeConverter is slow because it uses reflection to search for the TypeConverterAttribute. If you initialize a single private TypeConverter field, then you should be able to re-use the TypeConverter many times. –  Kevin P. Rice Jan 21 '13 at 8:44

For many types (integer, double, DateTime etc), there is a static Parse method. You can invoke it using reflection:

MethodInfo m = typeof(T).GetMethod("Parse", new Type[] { typeof(string) } );
if (m != null) { return m.Invoke(null, new object[] { base.Value }); }
share|improve this answer

You could possibly use a construct such as a traits class. In this way, you would have a parameterised helper class that knows how to convert a string to a value of its own type. Then your getter might look like this:

get { return StringConverter<DataType>.FromString(base.Value); }

Now, I must point out that my experience with parameterised types is limited to C++ and its templates, but I imagine there is some way to do the same sort of thing using C# generics.

share|improve this answer
public class TypedProperty<T> : Property
{
    public T TypedValue
    {
        get { return (T)(object)base.Value; }
        set { base.Value = value.ToString();}
    }
}

I using converting via an object. It is a little bit simpler.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks I have to convert a T in a interface and the simple conversion T object works correctly, easy and fast thanks –  LXG Feb 10 '12 at 9:42
4  
(int)(object)"54"; is a FATALITY!, this is not VB! –  Tomer W Mar 27 '12 at 14:08

TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(PropertyObject).ConvertFrom(Value)

TypeDescriptor is class having method GetConvertor which accept a Type object and then you can call ConvertFrom method to convert the value for that specified object.

share|improve this answer
    
Already answered right? –  nawfal Jan 15 at 18:28

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