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Say I have a list v = [1, 2, 3, 4, 3, 1, 2]. I want to write a function, find_pair which will check if two numbers are in the list and adjacent to each other. So, find_pair(v, 2, 3) should return True, but find_pair(v, 1, 4) should return False.

Is it possible to implement find_pair without a loop?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 8 down vote accepted
v = [1,2,3,4,3,1,2]
any([2,3] == v[i:i+2] for i in xrange(len(v) - 1))

While @PaoloCapriotti's version does the trick, this one is faster, because it stops parsing the v as soon as a match is found.

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1  
Won't the splice create a new sublist each time? wont 2 if's be better? correct me if i am wrong. –  st0le Dec 24 '11 at 16:18
    
I believe v[i:i+2] just views the elements of the list. –  eumiro Dec 24 '11 at 16:22
1  
@eumiro Your belief incorrect :-) List slices create new lists. For example, that is the mechanism behind the idiom for create a list copy: c = s[:]. –  Raymond Hettinger Dec 24 '11 at 16:28
    
@RaymondHettinger, Thanks for the confirmation. :) –  st0le Dec 26 '11 at 5:51

This is probably a bit of a round about way to do it, but you could use (with your variable v above):

' 2, 3' in str(v)
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5  
Are you sure that the pattern "12, 3" doesn't exist? –  DSM Dec 24 '11 at 15:42
1  
@uosɐſ: you edited the answer to include an extra space to try to avoid the problem I pointed out, but it still doesn't work. Your version won't match a 2,3 right at the start of the sequence (because the character before the 2 will be [, not a space). –  DSM Dec 24 '11 at 16:15
1  
I regret editting it. 1) it wasn't mine to edit, I was just trigger happy, 2) it screwed up your comment, 3) it's not an efficient solution. But in response to your comment here, the manner in which the list is converted to a string matters here, yes. If there were a leading space and no brackets it would work. –  uosɐſ Dec 24 '11 at 16:35
1  
' 2, 3' in str([-1] + v)? ;-) Of course, at this point the solution is overwrought enough that it's not worth it :) –  thedayturns Dec 31 '11 at 0:22
[2, 3] in [v[i:i+2] for i in range(len(v) - 1)]
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v = [1,2,3,4,3,1,2]

def find(x,y,v):
        return (x,y) in zip(v,v[1:])

print find(2,3,v)
print find(1,4,v)
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In general it is impossible without iterating over all the values. After all, a list of a thousand elements may end in [.., 2, 3].

In special cases, there are shortcuts. Are the values always ordered and are you always looking for a specific value? If so, you can e.g. use a binary search to find the value and then compare it with the next value. If the values are unordered, there is no shortcut. If you are looking for any two subsequent values, there is no shortcut. For cases in between, there may be a shortcut.

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You're going to need a loop.

Unlike Python strings which support a subsequence test using the in operator, Python lists do not have a builtin subsequence test.

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You can use the Boyer-Moore algorithm for a totally unnecessary speedup. The general case is a bit difficult, but it's straightforward if you're just looking for a pair.

def find_pair(seq, a, b):
    i = 1
    while i < len(seq):
        if seq[i] == b and seq[i - 1] == a: return i - 1
        i += 2 - (seq[i] == a)

print find_pair([1, 5, 3, 4, 3, 1, 2, 3, 3], 2, 3)
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In most cases, the speed of Python's built-in list.index() should overwhelm any advantages gained by implementing Boyer-Moore in pure Python. –  Michael Hoffman Dec 24 '11 at 16:50
    
True, this answer was a kind of joke :) –  user97370 Dec 24 '11 at 16:57

Perhaps even simpler:

a = range(100)
exists = (55,56) in zip(a, a[1:])
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eumiro's answer wins for elegance, but if you need something even faster, you can take advantage of the built-in list.index() method which saves some time over iterating over the whole list.

v = [1,2,3,4,3,1,2]

def f1(items):
    return any([2,3] == v[i:i+2] for i in xrange(len(v) - 1))

def f2(items):
    i = 0
    index = items.index
    try:
        while 1:
            i = index(2, i) + 1
            if items[i] == 3:
                return True
    except IndexError:
        return False

from timeit import repeat    
print "f1", min(repeat("f1(v)", "from __main__ import f1, v", number=1000))
print "f2", min(repeat("f2(v)", "from __main__ import f2, v", number=1000))

When I run this, I get:

f1 0.00300002098083
f2 0.0

This should be even faster when the match isn't so close to the beginning of the list.

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If writing the list happens far less often than reading from it, perhaps you could build a tree of prefixes upon write. [1] would have a child node [2], [2] would have a [3], and [3] a [4]. With a more complex data set, the tree would be more useful. It would have a depth of 2 in your case and would be indexed on the initial element in your search sequence.

You'd still be visiting each node, but only once for the life of the searched sequence, if append-only. As you append an element, you'd update the tree to include the subsequnce if not present. Then reads are down to a maximum of O(2 * k) where k is the number of unique elements. In the case of digits, that's 20 reads maximum to test if a sequence is in the list.

The speed advantage comes from precomputing the length-2 subsequences the list contains and from removing duplicates. It also scales well to longer lengths. O(depth * k) worst case. Even better if hashtables are employed.

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I know you are already happy with one of the answer's in this post but, you may try with the following

>>> v = [1,2,3,4,3,1,2]
def InList(v,(i,j)):
    start=1
    try:
         while True:
            if v[v.index(i,start)+1]==j and v[v.index(j,start)-1]==i:
                return True
            start=v.index(i)+1
    except IndexError:
        return False
    except ValueError:
        return False


>>> InList(v,(2,3))
True
>>> InList(v,(4,5))
False
>>> InList(v,(1,2))
True
>>> InList(v,(12,2))
False
>>> InList(v,(3,1))
True

Ok Curiosity got better of me and so wanted to test how does this implementation performed with the fastest posted implementation

>>> stmt1="""
v = [1,2,3,4,3,1,2]
def InList(v,(i,j)):
    start=1
    try:
         while True:
            if v[v.index(i,start)+1]==j and v[v.index(j,start)-1]==i:
                return True
            start=v.index(i)+1
    except IndexError:
        return False
    except ValueError:
        return False
InList(v,(2,3))
InList(v,(4,5))
InList(v,(1,2))
InList(v,(12,2))
"""
>>> stmt2="""
v = [1,2,3,4,3,1,2]
def InList(v,(x,y)):
    any([x,y] == v[i:i+2] for i in xrange(len(v) - 1))
InList(v,(2,3))
InList(v,(4,5))
InList(v,(1,2))
InList(v,(12,2))
"""
>>> t1=timeit.Timer(stmt=stmt1)
>>> t2=timeit.Timer(stmt=stmt2)
>>> print "%.2f usec/pass" % (1000000 * t1.timeit(number=100000)/100000)
13.67 usec/pass
>>> print "%.2f usec/pass" % (1000000 * t2.timeit(number=100000)/100000)
20.67 usec/pass
>>> 

Gosh this is way fast

Note** Thanks Michael for pointing it out. I have corrected it and here is my updated solution.

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This won't work if there is an example of (i, not j) before (i, j). –  Michael Hoffman Dec 24 '11 at 16:27
    
@MichaelHoffman, Thanks a lot for pointing it out. I have corrected it. You may wan't to have a look. –  Abhijit Dec 24 '11 at 16:47

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