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I was expecting the following will place inner (red) square at position 50,50 in browser window coordinate frame. But it didn't. Why?

<body>
<div style="position: fixed; left: 0px; right: 0px; top: 0px; bottom: 0px; background-color: yellow; padding: 50px;">
    <div style="position: absolute; left: 0px; right: 0px; width: 64px; height: 64px; background-color: red">
    </div>
</div>
</body>

SORRY MY FAULT

I was wishing to make "top:0px" for inner DIV but wrote "right:0px" instead. Just a mistake.

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This is a rather.... peculiar.... way of doing things. Could you please tell us why are you using position: fixed and position: absolute in that way? There may be a better solution for what you're trying to accomplish. – Madara Uchiha Dec 24 '11 at 17:10
    
Do you want the red square stays at that position upon scrolling? I wasn't sure what you meant by "browser window coordinate frame." – moey Dec 24 '11 at 17:16
    
Please post and accept your own answer if you feel like you've solved this question. – Wex Dec 24 '11 at 17:21
up vote 3 down vote accepted

position: absolute; takes your element out of the normal flow. Since you specify it's left as 0, that's where it will be.

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so why it doesn't do the same with top? – Dims Dec 24 '11 at 17:15

your inner div's position is absolute. try relative, or not setting that attribute at all.

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Well, it's because you position: absolute it to have left: 0; You likely want something like so:

<body>

    <div style="position: fixed; left: 0px; right: 0px; top: 0px; bottom: 0px; background-color: yellow; padding: 50px;">
        <div style="position: absolute; left: 50px; right: 0px; width: 64px; height: 64px; background-color: red">
        </div>
    </div>

</body>
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Because of position: absolute; on the red square.

You can take it out and get this, or set the left property and get this.

Also, as a side note, some people suggest (myself included) to don't attach a measurement unit to a CSS property when the value is 0. Zero of something is still zero, so 0px, 0em, etc, doesn't matter, it always evaluates to 0.

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the left right top and bottom css means 'distance from'. It's not meant to be used the way you are using it.

Here's a better example: http://jsfiddle.net/xAuLJ/

<body>
<div style="position: fixed; width:100%; height:100%; background-color: yellow;">
    <div style="position: absolute; left: 50%; top: 50%; width: 64px; height: 64px; margin-top:-32px; margin-left:-32px; background-color: red">
    </div>
</div>
</body>
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It was my own fault. I was wishing to make "top:0px" for inner DIV but wrote "right:0px" instead. When element moved down but not right I decided top padding processed differently than left.

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Probably best to incorporate this into your question rather than creating a new answer. – mc10 Dec 24 '11 at 18:16

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