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I am creating a networking library in C# that I can use in any application, and as part of this library I have a TCP client/server setup. This setup works perfectly in almost every situation; it connects, sends/receives data, and disconnects flawlessly when under minimal and medium stress loads. However, when I send large amounts of data from the client to the server, the client socket works for a varied amount of time (sometimes short, sometimes long) and then just refuses to send data for a while. Specifically, my data rate goes from the 550-750 KBps range to 0 KBps, and sits there for again a varied amount of time. Then the socket will start sending again for a very short time, and get "throttled" again. During the throttling, i was assuming that the socket was disconnected because I couldn't send anything, but Polling returns that the socket IS connected using this code:


public bool IsConnected(Socket socket)
{
     try
     {
         return !(socket.Poll(1, SelectMode.SelectRead) && socket.Available == 0);
     }
     catch (SocketException) { return false; }
}

I just took a networking class at my college, so I started thinking about the congestion control and flow control mechanisms in TCP, but it seems to me that neither would cause this problem; congestion control only slows the data rate, and a full buffer on the receiver's side wouldn't last nearly the length of time I am getting a 0 KBps data rate. The symptom seems to point towards either some type of heavy data throttling or mass scale dropping of packets.

My question is this: does anyone have any idea what might be causing this data "throttling", for lack of a better term? Also, is it possible that the packets I send are going further than just my router even though they are addressed to a host in the same subnet?

Edit: Just so it is clear, the reason I am trying to fix this problem is because I want to send files over TCP at the highest possible data rate. I understand that UDP can be used as well, and I will also be making a solution using it, but I want TCP to work first.

Specific Information:

I am using blocking read/write operations, and the server is multi-threaded. The client runs on its own thread as well. I am testing on my local subnet, bouncing all packets through my router, which should have a throughput of 54 Mbps. The packets are 8 KB each in size, and at maximum would be sent 1000 times a second (sending thread sleeps 1 ms), but obviously are not reaching that rate. Reducing the size of the packets so the data rate is lower causes the throttling to disappear. Windows 7 machines, 1 server, 1 client. The send operation always completes, it is the receive operation that errors out.

The send operation is below:


//get a copy of all the packets currently in the queue
                    IPacket[] toSend;
                    lock (packetQueues[c])
                    {
                        if (packetQueues[c].Count > SEND_MAX)
                        {
                            toSend = packetQueues[c].GetRange(0, SEND_MAX).ToArray();
                            packetQueues[c].RemoveRange(0, SEND_MAX);
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            toSend = packetQueues[c].ToArray();
                            packetQueues[c].RemoveRange(0, toSend.Length);
                        }
                    }
                    if (toSend != null && toSend.Length > 0)
                    { //write the packets to the network stream
                        try
                        {
                            writer.Write(toSend.Length);
                        }
                        catch (Exception e)
                        {
                            Logger.Log(e);
                            if (showErrorMessages)
                                MessageBox.Show("Client " + (int)c + ": " + e, "Error", MessageBoxButtons.OK);
                        }
                        for (int i = 0; i < toSend.Length; i++)
                        {
                            try
                            {
                                toSend[i].Write(writer);
                                if (onSend != null)
                                {
                                    object[] args = new object[2];
                                    args[0] = c;
                                    args[1] = toSend[i];
                                    onSend(args);
                                }
                            }
                            catch (Exception e)
                            {
                                Logger.Log(e);
                                if (showErrorMessages)
                                    MessageBox.Show("Client " + (int)c + ": " + e, "Error", MessageBoxButtons.OK);
                            }
                        }
                    }

And this is the receive code:


try
                    { 
                        //default buffer size of a TcpClient is 8192 bytes, or 2048 characters
                        if (client.Available > 0)
                        {
                            int numPackets = reader.ReadInt32();
                            for (int i = 0; i < numPackets; i++)
                            {
                                readPacket.Clear();
                                readPacket.Read(reader);
                                if (owner != null)
                                {
                                    owner.AcceptPacket(readPacket, c); //application handles null packets itself.
                                    if (onReceive != null)
                                    {
                                        object[] args = new object[2];
                                        args[0] = c;
                                        args[1] = readPacket;
                                        onReceive(args);
                                    }
                                }
                            }
                            timestamps[c] = TimeManager.GetCurrentMilliseconds();
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            double now = TimeManager.GetCurrentMilliseconds();
                            if (now - timestamps[c] >= timeToDisconnect)
                            { //if timestamp is old enough, check for connection.
                                connected[c] = IsConnected(client.Client);
                                if (!connected[c])
                                {
                                    netStream.Close();
                                    clients[c].Close();
                                    numConnections--;
                                    if (onTimeout != null) onTimeout(c);
                                }
                                else
                                {
                                    timestamps[c] = now;
                                }
                            }
                        }

                    }
                    catch (Exception s)
                    {
                        Logger.Log(s);
                        if (showErrorMessages)
                            MessageBox.Show("Client " + (int)c + ": " + s, "Error", MessageBoxButtons.OK);
                    }

Packet send/receive:


public void Write(BinaryWriter w)
        {
            w.Write(command); //byte
            w.Write(data.Type); //short
            w.Write(data.Data.Length); //int
            w.Write(data.Data); //byte array
            w.Flush();
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Reads a command packet from data off a network stream.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="r">The stream reader.</param>
        public void Read(BinaryReader r)
        {
            command = r.ReadByte();
            short dataType = r.ReadInt16();
            int dataSize = r.ReadInt32();
            byte[] bytes = r.ReadBytes(dataSize);
            data = new PortableObject(dataType, bytes);
        } 

Full Server Communication Loop:


public void Communicate(object cl)
        {
            int c = (int)cl;
            timestamps[c] = TimeManager.GetCurrentMilliseconds();
            try
            {
                //Console.Out.WriteLine("Thread " + Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId + " has started up. c = " + (int)c);

                TcpClient client = clients[c];
                client.ReceiveTimeout = 100;

                NetworkStream netStream = client.GetStream();
                BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(netStream);
                BinaryWriter writer = new BinaryWriter(netStream);

                while (client != null && connected[c])
                {
                    #region Receive
                    try
                    { 
                        //default buffer size of a TcpClient is 8192 bytes, or 2048 characters
                        if (client.Available > 0)
                        {
                            int numPackets = reader.ReadInt32();
                            for (int i = 0; i < numPackets; i++)
                            {
                                readPacket.Clear();
                                readPacket.Read(reader);
                                if (owner != null)
                                {
                                    owner.AcceptPacket(readPacket, c); //application handles null packets itself.
                                    if (onReceive != null)
                                    {
                                        object[] args = new object[2];
                                        args[0] = c;
                                        args[1] = readPacket;
                                        onReceive(args);
                                    }
                                }
                            }
                            timestamps[c] = TimeManager.GetCurrentMilliseconds();
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            double now = TimeManager.GetCurrentMilliseconds();
                            if (now - timestamps[c] >= timeToDisconnect)
                            { //if timestamp is old enough, check for connection.
                                connected[c] = IsConnected(client.Client);
                                if (!connected[c])
                                {
                                    netStream.Close();
                                    clients[c].Close();
                                    numConnections--;
                                    if (onTimeout != null) onTimeout(c);
                                }
                                else
                                {
                                    timestamps[c] = now;
                                }
                            }
                        }

                    }
                    catch (Exception s)
                    {
                        Logger.Log(s);
                        if (showErrorMessages)
                            MessageBox.Show("Client " + (int)c + ": " + s, "Error", MessageBoxButtons.OK);
                    }
                    #endregion

                    Thread.Sleep(threadLatency);

                    #region Send
                    //get a copy of all the packets currently in the queue
                    IPacket[] toSend;
                    lock (packetQueues[c])
                    {
                        if (packetQueues[c].Count > SEND_MAX)
                        {
                            toSend = packetQueues[c].GetRange(0, SEND_MAX).ToArray();
                            packetQueues[c].RemoveRange(0, SEND_MAX);
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            toSend = packetQueues[c].ToArray();
                            packetQueues[c].RemoveRange(0, toSend.Length);
                        }
                    }
                    if (toSend != null && toSend.Length > 0)
                    { //write the packets to the network stream
                        try
                        {
                            writer.Write(toSend.Length);
                        }
                        catch (Exception e)
                        {
                            Logger.Log(e);
                            if (showErrorMessages)
                                MessageBox.Show("Client " + (int)c + ": " + e, "Error", MessageBoxButtons.OK);
                        }
                        for (int i = 0; i < toSend.Length; i++)
                        {
                            try
                            {
                                toSend[i].Write(writer);
                                if (onSend != null)
                                {
                                    object[] args = new object[2];
                                    args[0] = c;
                                    args[1] = toSend[i];
                                    onSend(args);
                                }
                            }
                            catch (Exception e)
                            {
                                Logger.Log(e);
                                if (showErrorMessages)
                                    MessageBox.Show("Client " + (int)c + ": " + e, "Error", MessageBoxButtons.OK);
                            }
                        }
                    }
                    #endregion
                }
            }
            catch (ThreadAbortException tae) 
            { 
                Logger.Log(tae); 
                MessageBox.Show("Thread " + (int)cl + " was aborted.", "Error", MessageBoxButtons.OK); 
            }
        }   
share|improve this question
    
Although I see a lof of code, nothing useful to debug your problem. BTW, Sending and receiving packets with TCP is not that hard. You shouldn't worry about network speed, MTU etc. –  L.B Dec 24 '11 at 20:19
    
@L.B as i said in the question, my solution works perfectly most of the time. It is only under heavy stress that I have the problem I am describing, and the fact that sending/receiving in TCP is easy is exactly why I am looking for other problems like the MTU. The code I provided is just in case anyone wanted to see how I was sending/receiving and checking for connection. –  Darkhydro Dec 24 '11 at 20:31
1  
All I can say, It is most probably a bug/bad code in your project. Playing with TCP optimizations is not the real way to go. Otherwise, only network experts could be able to write TCP based codes –  L.B Dec 24 '11 at 20:38
    
@L.B I agree somewhat. I always turn towards my code as the source of the error first. However, in this case, I am inclined towards other options because the code is so stable at lower stress loads. I am definitely open to any errors you find in my code though. –  Darkhydro Dec 24 '11 at 20:59
    
is your receive code (starting with if (client.Available > 0)) above in a while(true) loop? –  L.B Dec 24 '11 at 21:30
show 4 more comments

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is probably your code, but it's difficult for us to say as it's incomplete.

I wrote up my own set of best practices in a .NET TCP/IP FAQ - after many, many years of TCP/IP experience. I recommend you start with that.

P.S. I reserve the term "packet" for packets on-the-wire. A TCP app has no control over packets. I use the term "message" for application-protocol-level messages. I think this reduces confusion, especially for newcomers.

share|improve this answer
    
I've added the full server communication loop if you have time to look at it. The client's communication loop is very similar, but with support for only one client at a time. Beyond this, there really isn't much more code. –  Darkhydro Dec 25 '11 at 0:39
    
After reading some of your article, it seems that my method of reading/writing was completely wrong to begin with. Is it possible for the BinaryReader's receive method to only read some of the data off the stream? It doesn't return how much was read, only what was read, so I have no way of knowing about partial receives –  Darkhydro Dec 25 '11 at 1:03
add comment

If you are trying to create a

networking library in C# that I can use in any application

were you aware of any existing open source libraries out there? networkComms.net is possibly a good start. If you can recreate the same problem with that i'd be very surprised. I've personally used it to maintain over 1000 concurrent connections each sending about 10 packets a second. Otherwise if you want to keep using your code perhaps looking at the source of networkComms.net can point out where you might be going wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
I meant any .NET application, I'm sorry if that was misleading. –  Darkhydro Dec 25 '11 at 0:33
    
Still confused. networkComms.net is written for use in .net applications. –  MarcF Dec 25 '11 at 9:50
    
I am trying to write my own library, not use another already existing one. It may be a good library to look at for reference though. –  Darkhydro Dec 25 '11 at 16:51
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Didn't look closely at your code snippets, but I see you have allocation in there - have you checked what pressure you're putting on the garbage collector?

PS: (sending thread sleeps 1 ms) - keep in mind that Sleep() without timeBeginPeriod() isn't going to get your 1ms resolution - probably closer to 10-20ms depending on Windows version and hardware.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Don't really know about C# and this code is incomplete. If I get it right, then

readPacket.Read(reader); 

will read whatever is available, and your receiver end for loop will be knocked over. Where are you checking the read amount of bytes ?

Anyway, a good way to check on what's happening at TCP level and lower is wireshark

share|improve this answer
    
I added the code for reading and writing of the CommandPacket class, which derives from IPacket and is what I am using as the readPacket variable. I would use wireshark, except that the number of packets I am sending before an error occurs is in the thousands. –  Darkhydro Dec 24 '11 at 20:58
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