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I have the following problem. I have a data set that has the beginning (STRTTIME) and ending time (ENDTIME) of a trip in military time format. I want to figure out the number of trips in each 15 minute time increment. My goal is to determine the number of trips that take place in each 15 minute time period starting from 0000 to 2359 (96 time slices). I can write 96 dummy variables in excel and do it but I would rather have some code in either R or Python (I am learning both so my knowledge is rudimentary). I can put a counter and then increment but I am not sure how to deal with two time variables and find myself hitting a deadend. My example is below. Here is some sample data (in CSV format).

  1. Suppose a trip starts at 0805 and ends at 0840 then each 15 minute period will have following values:
    • 0000-0015 - 0
    • 0015-0030 - 0
    • ....
    • 0800-0815 - 2/3
    • 0815-0830 - 1
    • 0830-0845 - 2/3
    • 0845-0900 - 0
    • ...
    • 2330-2345 - 0
    • 2345-2400 - 0
  2. Suppose another trip starts at 0810 and ends at 0850 then each 15 minute period will have the following values:
    • 0000-0015 - 0
    • 0015-0030 - 0
    • ....
    • 0800-0815 - 1/3
    • 0815-0830 - 1
    • 0830-0845 - 1
    • 0845-0900 - 1/3
    • ...
    • 2330-2345 - 0
    • 2345-2400 - 0
  3. After processing these 2 records the values in the 15 minute period dummy fields will be as follows (i.e. it has incremented it by the value of the field in the previous record):
    • 0000-0015 - 0
    • 0015-0030 - 0
    • ....
    • 0800-0815 - 1
    • 0815-0830 - 2
    • 0830-0845 - 5/3
    • 0845-0900 - 1/3
    • ...
    • 2330-2345 - 0
    • 2345-2400 - 0

Any code to do this is much appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Why is 805 2/3? Surely it would represent 1/3 of the 15 minute time slot 800-815? –  BeRecursive Dec 24 '11 at 21:03
    
Well, where exactly are you stuck? Have you learned about the CSV module and know how to read a CSV file? Have you learned about the time/datetime modules and know how to create times and do time calculations? Do you know that it's probably not a good idea to store the values as floats because of rounding problems? Do you know about lists and/or dicts? –  Tim Pietzcker Dec 24 '11 at 21:06
    
@BeRecursive: The trip starts at 0805 and continues beyond 0815, so it takes up 2/3 of the 15-minute time slot between 0800 and 0815. –  Tim Pietzcker Dec 24 '11 at 21:07
    
The trip started at 8:05 and ends at 8:40 so it means that 2/3 takes place in the 0800-0815 specific timeperiod, the 0815-0830 period is within the bounds of the start and end time of a trip hence 1, and the remaining 10 minutes of the trip takes place in the 0830-0845 period hence 2/3 for that specific timeperiod. –  Krishnan Dec 24 '11 at 21:12
    
@Tim Excuse for the dull moment :P –  BeRecursive Dec 24 '11 at 21:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As there is no answer in R yet, I will add one for that. I feel the solution might be a bit more elegant than python, but that is a matter of taste.

First, we will have to read the data:

data <- read.csv('sample_data.csv')

Then, I would like to convert the times to decimal format. Therefore, I do use the hour and min provided and not the military format. That would not be a problem, though, as you could always convert the values using simple integer arithmetic.

data <- cbind(data, start = data$STARTHR + data$STARTMIN/60, end= data$ENDHR + data$ENDMIN/60)

Now generate the time intervals (which we will identify by their starttime)

intervals <- seq(0, 23.75, by=0.25)

That part is a bit tricky... First we will check which trips end later than our interval end. All those trips we shall assign a 1, the trips that end before our interval we will assign a 0. If the trip ends within the interval, we will use assign the corresponding fraction between 0 and 1.

endvalues <- (pmax(pmin(outer(data$end, intervals, FUN="-"), 0.25), 0) / 0.25)  

Notice the use of outer. Here, the function "-" (subtraction) is used for all combinations of endtimes and the intervals vector. All other operations are element wise. I suggest that you just test the operation step by step, then it should be obvious what is done.

Similarly, we will do this with the startintervals, but now we will use negative signs.

startvalues <- (pmax(pmin(-outer(data$start, intervals, FUN="-"), 0), -0.25) / 0.25)

That enables us to generate a matrix that has a 1 whenever the interval is fully contained within the trip:

resultmatrix <- endvalues + startvalues

Finally, we may sum up over all trips and receive the number of trips within each interval:

intervalcount <- apply(resultmatrix, 2, sum)
share|improve this answer
    
That worked perfectly with my dataset. Thanks. –  Krishnan Dec 25 '11 at 5:56

Let me try to present the solution the exact way you represented

  1. First Lets Define the 15 min Time Ranges. Itertools.product is used to create the entire time range formatted with the datetime strftime after converting with time.

    timeset=[datetime.time(h,m).strftime("%H%M") for h,m in itertools.product(xrange(0,24),xrange(0,60,15))]+['2400']
    >>> timeset
    ['0000', '0015', '0030', '0045', '0100', '0115', '0130', '0145', '0200', '0215', '0230', '0245', '0300', '0315', '0330', '0345', '0400', '0415', '0430', '0445', '0500', '0515', '0530', '0545', '0600', '0615', '0630', '0645', '0700', '0715', '0730', '0745', '0800', '0815', '0830', '0845', '0900', '0915', '0930', '0945', '1000', '1015', '1030', '1045', '1100', '1115', '1130', '1145', '1200', '1215', '1230', '1245', '1300', '1315', '1330', '1345', '1400', '1415', '1430', '1445', '1500', '1515', '1530', '1545', '1600', '1615', '1630', '1645', '1700', '1715', '1730', '1745', '1800', '1815', '1830', '1845', '1900', '1915', '1930', '1945', '2000', '2015', '2030', '2045', '2100', '2115', '2130', '2145', '2200', '2215', '2230', '2245', '2300', '2315', '2330', '2345', '2400']
    
  2. Lets also define a timekeeper a List of the same length as timeset but initialized to Zero

    timekeeper=[0]*len(timeset)
    
  3. To keep it simple, instead of reading from CSV, I will define a tuple with the same data as your provided XLS sheet

    counter=[('1020','1050'),('0900','0930'),('1830','2000'),('2330','2350'),('1200','1202'),('1232','1234'),('1450','1635'),('1220','1440'),('0930','1205'),('1656','1730'),('1800','1850'),('1200','1210'),('1715','1727'),('1140','1215'),('1450','1500')]
    
  4. The following function is the main processor. I have used bisect to determine the starting and ending time sequence. I have also used fraction to avoid floating point and to maintain the format as depicted in the problem

    def TimeCounter(timekeeper,timeset,(sttime,entime)):
        st=bisect.bisect_left(timeset,sttime)
        en=bisect.bisect_left(timeset,entime)
        timekeeper[st]+=fractions.Fraction(int(timeset[st])-int(sttime),15)
        timekeeper[en]+=fractions.Fraction(int(entime)-int(timeset[en-1]),15)
        for i in xrange(st+1,en):
            timekeeper[i]+=1
    
  5. Finally the following two liner's would loop through the provided counter data and Call TimeCounter for each data sequence to update the timekeeper

    for c in counter:
        TimeCounter(timekeeper,timeset,c)
    
  6. The Final o/p looks something like this

    [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, Fraction(0, 1), 2, Fraction(2, 1), 2, 2, 2, Fraction(10, 3), 4, Fraction(8, 3), 2, 2, Fraction(8, 3), Fraction(4, 1), Fraction(64, 15), Fraction(4, 3), Fraction(64, 15), 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, Fraction(4, 3), Fraction(62, 3), 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, Fraction(2, 3), Fraction(88, 15), Fraction(2, 1), Fraction(18, 5), 0, Fraction(0, 1), 2, Fraction(2, 1), 4, Fraction(8, 3), 2, 2, 2, Fraction(22, 3), 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, Fraction(0, 1), 2, Fraction(2, 3)]
    
  7. Finally If you wan't to print the data exactly in the depicted format, you can use this code

    for i in xrange(0,len(timeset)-1):
        print '-'.join([timeset[i],timeset[i+1],str(timekeeper[i+1])])
    

And here is a sample o/p from the final display statements

1015-1030-10/3
1030-1045-4
1045-1100-8/3
1100-1115-2
1115-1130-2
1130-1145-8/3
1145-1200-4
1200-1215-64/15
1215-1230-4/3
1230-1245-64/15
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the code and the explanation. I decided to use this as it works exactly as i want it to. –  Krishnan Dec 25 '11 at 4:11
    
Thanks for the code but I decided to go with the R code since I had issues reading the data from a CSV with other variables in it. So there is more work to be done from my side to understand how python reads files etc. –  Krishnan Dec 25 '11 at 5:47

Since you are aiming to create a histogram, you are effectively solving the common problem of 'binning data', but in a slightly different way!

The easiest solution is to first create a dictionary of indices from 0 to 95 (96 slices, as you mentioned). Each of these represent a 15 minute time block.

Process each record individually and find the index at which they begin, and the index at which they end. Increment every value in your dictionary that is between these two indices to indicate that you have a trip that was occurring at that point in time.

import csv
spamReader = csv.reader(open('sample_data.csv', 'rb'), delimiter=',')

histogram = dict()

def toMinutes(militaryTime):
    if type(militaryTime) != str:
        raise ValueError("requires string as arg")
    hours = int(militaryTime[:2])
    mins = int(militaryTime[2:])
    return 60*hours + mins

for record in spamReader:
    if record[0] == 'STRTTIME':
        continue #skip first record which contains headers
    startTime = toMinutes(record[0]) #must convert militarytime to minutes
    endTime = toMinutes(record[1])

    startIndex = int(int(startTime)/15.0) #int division in python 3.0 and 2.X
    endIndex = int(int(endTime)/15) #is handled different, this unifies the two

    for i in range(startIndex,endIndex+1):
        valAd = 1
        if i == startIndex:
           valAd = 1-((startTime-(15*i))/15.0)
        if i == endIndex:
           valAd = ((endTime-(15*i))/15.0) #opposite boundary condition
        histogram[i] = histogram.get(i,0) + valAd
for key,val in histogram.items():
    print key,val
'''
output from your example csv, in minutes, which can easily be converted to militaryTime
41 0.666666666667
42 1
43 0.333333333333
46 0.333333333333
47 1
48 1.8
49 0.666666666667
50 1.26666666667
51 1
52 1
53 1
54 1
55 1
56 1
57 1
58 0.666666666667
59 1.33333333333
60 1.0
61 1
62 1
63 1
64 1
65 1
66 0.333333333333
67 0.266666666667
68 1
69 1.8
70 0.0
72 1.0
73 1
74 2.0
75 1.33333333333
76 1
77 1
78 1
79 1
80 0.0
94 1.0
95 0.333333333333
360 1.0
361 1
362 1
363 1
364 1
365 1
366 1
367 1
368 1
369 1
370 1
371 1
372 0.0
'''
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the code. Sorry it was not clear about the fraction because of the way I framed it. I want to get a histogram that shows the number of trips in each 15 minute time slice. Hence the need to keep a tab of the fractional trips. –  Krishnan Dec 24 '11 at 21:35
    
That works. I just have to make sure that the military time length is 4 char long. –  Krishnan Dec 24 '11 at 22:10

I might be misunderstanding the fractions part of the question as I take it as a way for you to determine if it should count towards the whole of "I want to figure out the number of 15 minute time increments the trip is taking place". If this is what you want, and for example, 10 minutes over doesn't count as a time increment, then something like this would work just fine for doing what I just quoted.

len([x for x in range(len(range(int('0000'), int('0215'), 15))) if x%7 < 4])
#outputs: 9

Basically, since it's in military time, you can cast it as an int and generate a range taking 15 steps. This will produce a list where you want to take 4 elements, discard 3 elements, take 4, and so on. So I take length and iterate over a new range of objects to normalize to 0,1,2,3,4,etc and use x%7 < 4 to do just that.

You could create a function to pass in the two strings. So in the above, if you changed '0000' to '0010' it would return 8 since you just cut 10 minutes into one of the 15 minute periods.

If you're needing more information then just the number of increments, maybe you could clarify your end needs for me.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the pointer. As I wrote above apologies that it was not clear about the fraction because of the way I framed it and i will edit it correctly. I want to get a histogram that shows the number of trips in each 15 minute time slice. Hence the need to keep a tab of the fractional trips. –  Krishnan Dec 24 '11 at 21:38
    
ah ok, i understand now –  dskinner Dec 24 '11 at 21:53

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